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thinking about swapping out the forks on my xr250 with cr125 forks. will they be strong enough for a guy over 200 lbs?

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Gets forks off an 80, youll need to respring. Get forks off a 500, youll need to respring. Wheres a 200lb Japanese boy? These bikes were built by 70lb asians.

YOU NEED TO RESPRING.

This is the #1 mod to do to ANY fork on ANY bike. Then valving. Spring for YOU.

Dont think youre solving something by pouring some 20w in there. 

Go to Enzo or ship to RaceTech.

In terms of geometrics, i doubt youre four feet tall. These cr forks youll love. Just raise them in clamps if theyre too tall.

 

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I disagree. The CR forks are probably an inch and a half longer than the post 96 XR250 forks. If you want woods handling you will not be able to slide the clamps up that far and even if your could, your front wheel will bottom out on the fender. 

Many stock CR125R forks are .43-44 and the stock XR250 springs are around .39 or something. Racetech's spring calculator says a 2000 XR250R with a 200lb enduro rider should use a .43 spring. So you really are accomplishing a re-spring. Don't forget if you stiffen the front you will also need to do the back. I used an 11.6 rear racing haresceambles at 205 lbs no gear. The valving on late 90's CR forks are dreadful for off road. I have a set on my XR440R I've been tuning for racing.

 

Have fun!

Edited by Firestone
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9 hours ago, Jtshunter1 said:

 

thinking about swapping out the forks on my xr250 with cr125 forks. will they be strong enough for a guy over 200 lbs?

 

What year CR125? What's the perceived advantage? 

Why not the usual XR4 swap?

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9 minutes ago, Jtshunter1 said:

xr4 swap?

Search "400 forks 250" in this XR250/400 forum and it describes why the 400 forks are better. I  would link but I am on my phone.

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Nothing wrong with CR forks as a candidate. Except the cost. 

XR400 forks don't need a different wheel or special axle, don't need a custom triple clamp stem or funky bearings, and can be slid up in th forks enough to deal with the fact that they are longer than a XR250 forks. 

They are not as good of forks as newer CR or CRF forks though. But a marked improvement over XR250R toothpicks.

high cost also but Brice Triplett's XR250R forks are top notch. 

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12 minutes ago, Firestone said:

Nothing wrong with CR forks as a candidate. Except the cost. 

XR400 forks don't need a different wheel or special axle, don't need a custom triple clamp stem or funky bearings, and can be slid up in th forks enough to deal with the fact that they are longer than a XR250 forks. 

They are not as good of forks as newer CR or CRF forks though. But a marked improvement over XR250R toothpicks.

high cost also but Brice Triplett's XR250R forks are top notch. 

Interesting your comment re : late 90s CR forks. I heard the early USD forks weren't much to write home about either. Was going to ask what you ran but you mention late 90s CR forks on an XR440.

Do you know how different/similar XR250R forks were to the late RWU CR125R forks? Sorry to thread jack. 

Fwiw, CRF/X forks feel amazing. If going USD that's the go IMO. 

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On 7/19/2017 at 8:09 AM, Firestone said:

I disagree. The CR forks are probably an inch and a half longer than the post 96 XR250 forks. If you want woods handling you will not be able to slide the clamps up that far and even if your could, your front wheel will bottom out on the fender. 

Many stock CR125R forks are .43-44 and the stock XR250 springs are around .39 or something. Racetech's spring calculator says a 2000 XR250R with a 200lb enduro rider should use a .43 spring. So you really are accomplishing a re-spring. Don't forget if you stiffen the front you will also need to do the back. I used an 11.6 rear racing haresceambles at 205 lbs no gear. The valving on late 90's CR forks are dreadful for off road. I have a set on my XR440R I've been tuning for racing.

 

Have fun!

I went with what Racetech recommended for my forks on my 03, and they were too stiff for my liking.  Went back to the stockers and played around with the compression and tire air settings and I am now pretty happy with the way the forks behave.  I have no need or desire to change anything now, the deflection is at a manageable minimum.  And they don't pack down, either.  I weigh 205 lbs. 

Just learn to ride.

Edited by cjjeepercreeper
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I've owned a bunch of XRs and every one needed fork mods for my riding areas and how I ride so some more info will help.  Fork conversions have a lot of obstacles, I've done several and the big question is why and your intended improvements.

Modern MX forks are just not good for most trail use, but can be modified. I have CRF250R forks on my CRF250X and when I brought it to the PNW for trail riding I had to do a lot of mods to reduce deflection off rock debris and tree roots. IMO I would avoid early MX USD forks, but early conventional cartridge forks are good, some very good. Late USDs like the Showa Twin Chamber forks have great potential but need work for some types of riding. 

This forum can provide you with lots of good info.

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