Bodyposition and shifting under power

Hello. 

I got myself a mans bike, 250 2 stroke and yesterdays "meh" have gotten todays struggle. 

I have a problem with accelerating standing and shifting under power. How should I place my body on the bike? Ive tried going really over the front end to have the pegs "pushing" on me but I feel that I have no control over the bars and dipping into every rough spot on the track. 

If I set my body up neutral then I get alot of arm pump from holding on and I cant shift. Lifting the leg, sneaking it under the shifter and pulling up is a real no go if I have the hand on the throttle. When I try I have to put all the weight on right peg and compensate with pressure on left handlebargrip and I cant imagine thats how you do it. No control. 

I think a part of my problem is that I grip the bike with my boots, pointing them slightly inwards. Im trying to change this into holding with the knees but I get even more problems holding on under WOT. 

Anyone that could shine on this matter who had the same problems?

I had the same problem on my CR250. For me it just took a lot of time and practice. Reading articles is a good idea to learn some tricks, but when it comes down to technique riding is your best teacher. Put your head just above the handlebars sit just off the seat then practice. I couldn't shift standing up for the longest time.

When I try I have to put all the weight on right peg and compensate with pressure on left handlebargrip and I cant imagine thats how you do it. No control. 


You do have to put all your weight on the right peg momentarily when you shift while standing. Since this makes the bike want to lean right, I nudge the right side shroud with the inside of my right knee while leaning slightly left. It's subtle and works well for me. Anyone watching wouldn't notice me doing this while shifting. There's no getting around at least some pulling on your arms while standing. Look at pictures of 250 National starts from the side. Those guys are hanging way off the back standing with fully extended arms at times searching for maximum traction. Of course you can minimize strain on the arms by gripping with your legs and pivoting forward on the pegs, as you describe. Pulling on the bars while standing drives the rear tire into the ground for traction, so it's not always a bad thing. Lot's more to discuss on this topic.

Sorry to hijack your thread - I'm also having the same issue.  I've been looking on the web for some good videos, but can't seem to find anything that really demonstrates it. Keen to hear some more feedback/links for this one.

Thank you.

Hello. 

I got myself a mans bike, 250 2 stroke and yesterdays "meh" have gotten todays struggle. 

I have a problem with accelerating standing and shifting under power. How should I place my body on the bike? Ive tried going really over the front end to have the pegs "pushing" on me but I feel that I have no control over the bars and dipping into every rough spot on the track. 

If I set my body up neutral then I get alot of arm pump from holding on and I cant shift. Lifting the leg, sneaking it under the shifter and pulling up is a real no go if I have the hand on the throttle. When I try I have to put all the weight on right peg and compensate with pressure on left handlebargrip and I cant imagine thats how you do it. No control. 

I think a part of my problem is that I grip the bike with my boots, pointing them slightly inwards. Im trying to change this into holding with the knees but I get even more problems holding on under WOT. 

Anyone that could shine on this matter who had the same problems?

 

smooth straits you can be far forward and more strait legged ( legs in line with your back) when you shift. As things get rougher you start having to bring your weight back. You still keep your head forward but bend your knees, get you butt back and keep your body low when shifting. This crouching takes more energy. If you can get the power down enough to lighten up the front wheel after your shift you can start to try to straiten your legs a bit if you can keep the front end light and stay on the gas. You have to be on the gas if you want to be forward and not get beat up.

Edited by temporarily_locked

Thank you so much for the info!  

I have a question though: Can you still stay on the gas as hard, as it gets rough and you sit back, get low etc without death gripping the handle bars? I tried something similar today and managed to flip the bike. Can't remember if I jerked the throttle as I shifted back or not, happened all too fast. At the moment I feel like I'm having to get extremely far over the bike to accelerate hard. Yet I'm looking at videos on youtube and pros just never seem to get that far over the bike.  Or I'm looking at the wrong videos. 

 

1 hour ago, Mickydee said:

Thank you so much for the info!  

I have a question though: Can you still stay on the gas as hard, as it gets rough and you sit back, get low etc without death gripping the handle bars? I tried something similar today and managed to flip the bike. Can't remember if I jerked the throttle as I shifted back or not, happened all too fast. At the moment I feel like I'm having to get extremely far over the bike to accelerate hard. Yet I'm looking at videos on youtube and pros just never seem to get that far over the bike.  Or I'm looking at the wrong videos. 

 

I think its all perception. 

I mean, sometimes I think Im going fast or jumping high, until I see a video and realize Im not even close. 

Maybe its the same, thinking we are way ocer the bike but barely have the head over the bar. Just lile when you are unexperienced in wheelie, feels like tipping over when wheel is 20cm of the ground to due forks "releasing" another 100mm :p 

Ha ha ha I can relate to the 'wheelie' comment! 😂😂

Edited by Mickydee

If you're coming off a 125 2 stroke, then you'll have a learning curve. I know i did. Hell, look back at Ricky Carmichael when he switched from 125s to 250s. He spent more time on the ground than on the bike. Lol.

The added power will want to pull you of the back of the bike, plus the added weight. Squeeze the bike with your knees to help eliminate the need to hold on tighter with your hands.

Also, adjust the shifter up or down to fit your style better. It's your bike, make it fit you. Most seem to run their shifter level with their peg. I run mine higher. The bottom edge of my shifter tip is level with the top of my peg. Its what i found comfortable for me.
Just keep practicing.

Sent from my SM-G920P using ThumperTalk mobile app

I had to move my shifter higher to learn to shift while standing. As far as technique, while you are in the proper position while accelerating (over the front and clamping with the inside of you knees and lower legs) the quick movement should not be as drastic. If you are clamping hard, the extra force on your right leg and knee while you shift shouldn't set you off balance.

You need to really have your body position and technique down and it will come with experience. I have found that the faster I get... not that I'm particularly fast... the more I shift my body weight and position all over without even noticing. Just like you see guys hanging all over their bike in the air, the more comfortable you get the easier and more natural it becomes.

Practice, practice, practice....

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