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FI bike dropped in river crossing: what to do?

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I got a 2016 Husky FE450 a few months ago which I'm in love with. However, one thing keeps bothering me: what to do if I drown the bike? I live in a tropical climate with a dry and rainy season, so river crossings and deceptively deep murky water is just part of riding. For example, on last weekend's ride, 6 out of our 9 bikes drowned at one point or another (mostly rider error). They were fairly quickly brought back to life as riders are used to it (air filter out, lift the front of the bike, drain the water, remove spark plug, get extra water out, and dry plug, empty carb etc). We carry bikes over the big crossings, but mistakes happen. I'm very careful and good rider in water so in years of riding have never drowned a bike. Still, I had a very close call last weekend, so don't want to be stuck in the middle of nowhere not knowing what to do.

So anyways, what's the step by step procedure for bringing back to life a FI bike? I've read numerous things about them which seem to contradict each other (can't be drowned, can be drowned etc). So let me be clear, by drowning I mean: I'm crossing a river and drop the bike while it's running. What do I do? 

Thanks

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If it has in intake, it can be drowned, period.

You covered it, basically.  Get the water out. You must know what is going on, before trying to start it again. That is the most important thing; do not guess!

If the bike goes underwater, do not attemp to restart until you have removed the air cleaner and tilted the bike to see if anything comes out of the intake tract.

If anything does, you need to pull the plug, put the bike upside down and 'pump' out the water, via the starter and plug hole.

If nothing does, than most likely you did not suck water into the motor. Restart without the air cleaner, and re install the air cleaner if you can dry it off. 

If you do suck water into the motor, trying to start it can cause hydro lock and crack the cases or snap a head bolt.

Now, once you get home you must change the oil at least once, preferably a couple times, a few minutes of running inbetween.

The next thing is to go through the entire bike and displace any water, using WD-40 or similar. This indludes the TPS, the wiring harness, the hubs, etc etc.

If you don't do this, you will get corrosion later on down the line.

https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1CHMO_enUS529US530&q=what+to+do+if+you+drown+your+motorcycle&oq=what+to+do+if+you+drown+your+motorcycle&gs_l=serp.12...12248.13792.0.15647.11.8.3.0.0.0.200.784.7j0j1.8.0....0...1.1.64.serp..2.6.441...0i7i30k1j30i10k1.S907eUT8-_k

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4 hours ago, THE KRAN said:

If the bike goes underwater, do not attemp to restart until you have removed the air cleaner and tilted the bike to see if anything comes out of the intake tract.

If anything does, you need to pull the plug, put the bike upside down and 'pump' out the water, via the starter and plug hole.

If nothing does, than most likely you did not suck water into the motor. Restart without the air cleaner, and re install the air cleaner if you can dry it off. 

The KTM/Husky intact tract is very well designed and actually goes up (vs some of my older bikes which connected "down" into the carb), so I don't know how anything could visibly come out from the air intake that hasn't already drained out once the bike was standing upright (no lifting of wheel or upside down). Assuming it went into the cylinder, then by "starter and lug hole", you mean standard method? As in, take out spark plug, use e-starter (and maybe a finger to create a bit of compression) to force water out? Or upside down, put in 5th and turn the rear wheel? Just making sure... 

Also, what do some people mean when they say no water can get in unless it's in the fuel tank? Are they assuming the bike isn't running when it falls into the water? 

Thanks for your input.

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4 hours ago, Bitteeinbit said:

The KTM/Husky intact tract is very well designed and actually goes up (vs some of my older bikes which connected "down" into the carb), so I don't know how anything could visibly come out from the air intake that hasn't already drained out once the bike was standing upright (no lifting of wheel or upside down). Assuming it went into the cylinder, then by "starter and lug hole", you mean standard method? As in, take out spark plug, use e-starter (and maybe a finger to create a bit of compression) to force water out? Or upside down, put in 5th and turn the rear wheel? Just making sure... 

Also, what do some people mean when they say no water can get in unless it's in the fuel tank? Are they assuming the bike isn't running when it falls into the water? 

Thanks for your input.

.....because they are confusing opinion with fact. The throtte body butterfly is not water tight, if water gets inside. If the motor is running, you are pumping filthy water into the engine, until it starves for air. 

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I have always been one to use the rear wheel to turn the motor over,  but that is probably because I have had few bikes with electric start.  I like saving the battery to start it with, which can sometimes take more cranking after it it wet.

Now I am curious:  The mention of (maybe a finger of it to create a bit of compression) to force the water out.   I am having a really hard time seeing how that will actually force or increase the amount of water actually moved.  Not that I haven't seen lots of people do it,  and since they get some water squirting by their finger they feel it did something I guess.  Anyway,   does that really work for you?  

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The finger over the plug sounds useless.  No chance that actually helps clear water out.

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On 7/21/2017 at 0:57 PM, turbo dan said:

The finger over the plug sounds useless.  No chance that actually helps clear water out.

That is to build up pressure so the air forces out the water faster, right past you thumb

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