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What size rear tire do you prefer?

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My bike is an 08 and it has the 120/80 rear so it's rather large. I read somewhere that going down a smaller size would make our bulky kawies corner better. Is this true? A friend gave me a good set of tires and the rear is 110/90.

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Thanks bud. And I know these older kx450f's weren't exactly known for excellent cornering lol. My bike feels like it just wants to stand up and plow through a rut rather than flow through it. But I suck at corners anyways. I will say the bike handles well straight in rough stuff and doesn't bounce much at all in sand.

 

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On 22/07/2017 at 1:15 AM, IraqvetUSMC said:

My bike feels like it just wants to stand up and plow through a rut rather than flow through it.

Narrower tires probably wont solve that. Neglecting corners without ruts to rail ...  A bike usually stands up mid way through a nice rut corner because you cannot dial in enough chassis lean before you get to that point and/or your body weight is too far aft so your front tire can climb/bounce out and over the wall. Which often happens because the bike is setup to oversteer on corner entry upon initial lean in. Usually this happens because the bike is setup too much like a stinkbug with front low and/or rear high. You want a bike setup which does not steer too soon upon initial lean over. So you can lay it over early, then apply front or rear steering to bring it around.   It gets complex because suspension damper settings (clickers) on either end can also cause big problems to upset the chassis. 22mm triple clamps will often help cornering (easier to lean the chassis and more front traction). But first try to kill the stinkbug and keep your body weight forward.

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Narrower tires probably wont solve that. Neglecting corners without ruts to rail ...  A bike usually stands up mid way through a nice rut corner because you cannot dial in enough chassis lean before you get to that point and/or your body weight is too far aft so your front tire can climb/bounce out and over the wall. Which often happens because the bike is setup to oversteer on corner entry upon initial lean in. Usually this happens because the bike is setup too much like a stinkbug with front low and/or rear high. You want a bike setup which does not steer too soon upon initial lean over. So you can lay it over early, then apply front or rear steering to bring it around.   It gets complex because suspension damper settings (clickers) on either end can also cause big problems to upset the chassis. 22mm triple clamps will often help cornering (easier to lean the chassis and more front traction). But first try to kill the stinkbug and keep your body weight forward.


Thanks for the good info bud. Now I am looking at my rear shock on my 08 and it seems like it will be a pita to get to in order to set the sag. It seems as if the only way in there is just above the exhaust pipe in front of the frame by the kick starter. And that almost makes it a one way deal where I could get a long punch in there and go one way. Anyone have any tricks to this?
Thanks

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5 hours ago, IraqvetUSMC said:

Anyone have any tricks to this?

You lift the bike on a stand (or lay it on the ground) and turn the spring with your hand and with the upper lock nut loosened usually the lower seat nut will turn with the spring.  This assumes clean threads and it helps with light oil on them.  While turning the spring, if the adjuster nut does not turn with it, then get a large screw driver and gently lever the adjuster nut in the desired direction.

To unlock the top nut, get a large screw driver and mallet and tap from any access path you can find. Better than a screw driver is a piece of alum or copper rod, but a screw driver works fine, just be very careful to not miss the impact point and butcher your alum thread on the body.

Just tighten then top lock nut very gently when you are testing sag settings. It barely needs any torque on it to stop the lower adjusting nut from turning.

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16 hours ago, numroe said:

You lift the bike on a stand (or lay it on the ground) and turn the spring with your hand and with the upper lock nut loosened usually the lower seat nut will turn with the spring.  This assumes clean threads and it helps with light oil on them.  While turning the spring, if the adjuster nut does not turn with it, then get a large screw driver and gently lever the adjuster nut in the desired direction.

To unlock the top nut, get a large screw driver and mallet and tap from any access path you can find. Better than a screw driver is a piece of alum or copper rod, but a screw driver works fine, just be very careful to not miss the impact point and butcher your alum thread on the body.

Just tighten then top lock nut very gently when you are testing sag settings. It barely needs any torque on it to stop the lower adjusting nut from turning.

I have never set sag but it's nice to know that it should spin by hand with the spring once the lock nut is loose. I see where I can get at it from both sides of the shock reservoir but the side between the reservoir and the air box looks like its going to be a real treat as there isn't much room and I can see where someone has already gouged the reservoir from trying to set the sag before. Once the sag is set and clickers are adjusted hopefully I can find a happy medium because the local tracks to the east of me are straight sand and the local tracks to the west including our own track are dirt/clay so that makes it a little tricky to get it dialed in.

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If you have the right rear spring rate, then you should be able to find a sag setting which works ok for sand or hard clay. Then just some clicker changes to suit the different tracks.

Crazy you've never set the sag. Not only does it impact rear suspension function, but front end geometry too.

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On ‎7‎/‎25‎/‎2017 at 6:55 PM, numroe said:
If you have the right rear spring rate, then you should be able to find a sag setting which works ok for sand or hard clay. Then just some clicker changes to suit the different tracks.
Crazy you've never set the sag. Not only does it impact rear suspension function, but front end geometry too.


This is my 3rd year back after a 13 year hiatus lol. As a kid I didn't worry about suspension and just rode lol.
My bike was setup for a 220lb guy and I was 150lbs at the time back when I had
My 94 kx 250. I left the suspension alone because i didn't race or anything.


 

Edited by IraqvetUSMC

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3 minutes ago, IraqvetUSMC said:

This is my 3rd year back after a 13 year hiatus lol. As a kid I didn't worry about suspension and just rode lol.

With some basic suspension and chassis setup your bike could feel so much better (easier, faster and safer) that you might think back and wonder how you "just rode".  No kidding.  With some basic setup they just work. Body weight near the middle. Sit or stand. Aim the front. Lean it over. Throttle it on. Enjoy. Good setup and observers could be fooled into thinking I can actually ride.  Way less tiring too.

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11 hours ago, numroe said:

With some basic suspension and chassis setup your bike could feel so much better (easier, faster and safer) that you might think back and wonder how you "just rode".  No kidding.  With some basic setup they just work. Body weight near the middle. Sit or stand. Aim the front. Lean it over. Throttle it on. Enjoy. Good setup and observers could be fooled into thinking I can actually ride.  Way less tiring too.

That all makes sense bud. Now my only downfall right now is that my front forks are pouring out oil, so before I can set the sag I need to have them resealed. And then hopefully get everything all dialed in.

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