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Mountain climb in/or around Denver Colorado?

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Hell everyone,

I just bought my first dirt bike and I freaking love it. Turns out all my trials pedal-biking and street motorcycle experience makes me quite competent at trail riding. 

With that said, does anyone know of a good trail ride that ends at some peak? I am looking for a technical ride that would require moderate skill and effort to go the few miles needed. I am not looking for a jeep trail that is bumpy at most. The skill level needs to be just under doing wheelies to get over logs or shooting up large rock land slides... 

 

The bike is a KLX 250sf with the 351 kit and the 250s knobie wheels and tires.

 

Thanks for the help. Happy motoring all!

 

David

 

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Climb mountains all the time in the winter, all over CO/WY/MT/ID.

Bonus, don't even need trails. :smirk:  Pick the easy way, or say "I want to go to the top of that mountain, through all those trees." :busted:

200-FILE0401_-L.jpg

 

i-ZQ2S4s8-L.jpg

 

summer_sucks.gif

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There are some rides that are within 1-1.5 hrs of Denver that might challenge you and provide a good view such as

Kingston Peak/Central City

Webster Pass/Redcone

Montezuma/Santa Fe Peak

These are all 4WD roads and can be challenging rocky roads. You will need to venture further away from Denver for some singletrack.  You can ride trails down at Rampart Range, and 717.  Some of them are motorcycle only.

 

Start here on places to ride:

http://www.staythetrail.org/content.aspx?page_id=22&club_id=266593&module_id=224600

 

Motor Vehicle Use Maps are your ultimate guide to to where motorized travel is allowed in the National Forest.  You will need and OHV sticker ($25.25 to ride single track or on OHV trails less than 50" wide).

FYI...nice bike but what you have is a dual sport bike with some decent offroad mods and it should get you to plenty of places.  You can convert or plate any true offroad/enduro bike in Colorado as long as you meet the plating requirements/inspection.

 

 

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15 hours ago, SilvFx said:

There are some rides that are within 1-1.5 hrs of Denver that might challenge you and provide a good view such as

Kingston Peak/Central City

Webster Pass/Redcone

Montezuma/Santa Fe Peak

These are all 4WD roads and can be challenging rocky roads. You will need to venture further away from Denver for some singletrack.  You can ride trails down at Rampart Range, and 717.  Some of them are motorcycle only.

 

Start here on places to ride:

http://www.staythetrail.org/content.aspx?page_id=22&club_id=266593&module_id=224600

 

Motor Vehicle Use Maps are your ultimate guide to to where motorized travel is allowed in the National Forest.  You will need and OHV sticker ($25.25 to ride single track or on OHV trails less than 50" wide).

FYI...nice bike but what you have is a dual sport bike with some decent offroad mods and it should get you to plenty of places.  You can convert or plate any true offroad/enduro bike in Colorado as long as you meet the plating requirements/inspection.

 

 

Yeah, I am thinking I may have shot myself in the foot with the SF converted for dirt. The rake is slightly different, I have less suspension, and the gearing is taller. I do love the low seat height though. 

A mythical 31" seat height 200 lb 40 hp bike would be great. I think I am 33" with the knobies, 300 lb, and 33 hp. That's hand grenade close...

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You can always buy a dirtbike with the weight, performance, gearing etc. that you are seeking and have the suspension professionally lowered.  In addition, you can take some foam out of the seat or use the aftermarket seats.  For example, KTM powerparts sells "low" seats for about $129.

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Got it thanks. 

 

How much does premium suspension bits help with the lower speeds of trail riding? I usually don't get air off of anything.

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13 minutes ago, KLX_351 said:

Got it thanks. 

 

How much does premium suspension bits help with the lower speeds of trail riding? I usually don't get air off of anything.

I think it helps a lot on trail riding.  Even if you aren't catching air you will notice a lot of difference on being able to ride quickly and handle the rocks.  And, Colorado has lots and lots of rocks, roots, ruts, waterbars, etc. where you can benefit from better suspension.

I can tell you that i began riding in the 1970's when we had a whopping 6-7" front travel and dual shocks in the back with an extraordinary 4" travel.  While I was still growing and my riding abilities were improving just due to that, my major riding progression came with the suspension and braking that began to improve significantly in 1980's.

I am not recommending you go out and get an enduro bike.  Ride what you have and explore and you can figure out is what you have is doing the trick or if you want to upgrade.  Just passing along some food for thought for the next bike beyond your current one.  And, if you are like me you are always thinking about the next replacement bike you plan to buy.

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23 hours ago, KLX_351 said:

I think I am 33" with the knobies, 300 lb, and 33 hp. That's hand grenade close...

It's a sad fact, that affects all naturally aspirated ICEs, but that 33hp at sea level goes down to < 20hp when you come up to the mountains.

You loose about 3% of your HP for every 1,000ft of elevation.

Not to mention it's harder to breathe too!

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On 7/24/2017 at 11:33 AM, SnowMule said:

like this?

DSC01470_-L.jpg

 

:lol:

It's a good thing sleds have reverse, or you'd be really stuck. ;)

Edited by Colorado^

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41 minutes ago, Colorado^ said:

It's a sad fact, that affects all naturally aspirated ICEs, but that 33hp at sea level goes down to < 20hp when you come up to the mountains.

You loose about 3% of your HP for every 1,000ft of elevation.

Not to mention it's harder to breathe too!

Than you add the 10 to 20% drive-train losses. 

 

I love to argue with people about miatas. Their answer that "it's balanced" only works at sea level. It's under powered up here.

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8 minutes ago, KLX_351 said:

Than you add the 10 to 20% drive-train losses. 

 

I love to argue with people about miatas. Their answer that "it's balanced" only works at sea level. It's under powered up here.

Tell me about it, I used to own a 96'.  It was a complete dog up in the mountains (but fun in the snow).  Now I live up at 10Kft, and drive turbos. 

 

 

 

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Another thing that altitude kills is cooling capacity. Radiators need to be bigger, oil coolers, brake ducts, etc... That pikes peak hill climb really shows all that off. Pro built cars overheat and do not finish. Womp womp...

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How high are you looking at going and what trails do you consider technical?  There isn't much on the front range that is both technical and high.  Kingston peak is pretty easy but has good views.  Others would know more about the stuff around the springs but I can't think of much that goes over tree line.

If you up for an overnight trip I would suggest a go at Flag mountain via Italian Creek.  It isn't brutal but has some mild technical sections and your going to get a good idea of what altitude does to your bike, especially on the last mile to the peak.  Lost of good riding down there but be careful about getting in over your head.  

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