Jump to content

'11 KX250f Newbie buyer gets burned!

Recommended Posts

I started riding again a couple of years ago to have fun with my kids. We have a track close by and my oldest is loving it. I bought a 2011 KX 250f. We went on a father son MX trip and after a full day of track riding the bike got harder and harder to start. Next morning it was dead. Couldn't even push start it. Took it down to the local shop and he got it going again by adjusting intake valve but said I'm going to need a new intake valve ASAP. This is not a job I can do. Couple questions to the group. How much should I expect to pay for new intake valves? Should I have more work done while Their in there? I paid $3k for the bike and after 3 days on the track if it needs $1500 in work do I fix it or trade it in? I won't sell to individual without disclosing the problem. Could really use some advise.

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was quoted around 950 to have the top end on my 15 done. this was valves, machine work, piston and rings. everything needed. This price was from a very well know race motor shop near me. do your research and bring it to a private shop

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why can't you do the job yourself?  Getting the head off is only nuts and bolts, ship the head to a good shop, and slap it back on the bike.  There are really only 2 things you need to be careful of and that is torque values and sequence and getting the timing lined up.  Both require only a bit of patience and you might end up with a good father/son session.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI. I recently replaced the left intake valve on one of our bikes here. Cost: 93$ for the valve, 28$ for head gasket, 1.5 hr of my time start to finish. (riding bike to riding bike).  There is quite a difference between fixing what needs to be fixed or doing complete overhauls. Imho, wrt valve maintenance there is an excessive amount of money being thrown around and tossed away regularly.

Edited by FaceDeAce
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the idea of doing it myself but I travel every week for work and super short on time. Plus I have a lot of uncertainty and doubt. This forum is helping though. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your on the fence buy a service manual and spend a half hour reading up on it.  Pull the head and ship it out one weekend.  You should be able to find a shop that will put in new valves and shim it.  When you get it back in a week or 2 spend a few hours putting it back together.  Once you have the chain back on the cams just give the crank a few slow turns to make sure nothing binds before you try starting it.  I'm not joking when I say this but my guess is you'll spend more time talking to shops and dropping off/pickup up that you will actually working on the bike.  Only real specialty tool you might need is a torque wrench and you don't really need anything fancy there.

I just did the valve clearance on a WR450F.  Never worked on one of those engines before, never played with shims before, but an hour spent on youtube and an hour of actual wrenching and the bike was back up and running.  I seriously spent more time driving to the shop to pick up a feeler gauge than I did doing the actual work.

There is nothing better than that feeling when you bike fires after having it in parts hours earlier.  Biggest thing is to think like a surgeon - give it a good cleaning before you open her up, clean hands and make sure all the shop towels are accounted for before sewing it up.

Whatever route you decide on good luck.  I've been the victim of a few lemons and know the feeling.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright. Think I'm convinced. Don't really have much to lose at this point. I actually have all the tools already. I'm an okay wrench. Might as well learn now or keep paying big money that I don't have

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, TheSnide said:

Alright. Think I'm convinced. Don't really have much to lose at this point. I actually have all the tools already. I'm an okay wrench. Might as well learn now or keep paying big money that I don't have

:thumbsup::thumbsup: I'll bet if you ask around at the track you can find another experienced rider/mech  who might help walk you through it. Lots of good guys in this sport who are willing to help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've noticed that already.  When the bike died another guy let me ride his bike just so I could get some laps in with my son.   

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×