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What capacity of configuration knowledge is needed to install hotcams for ideal performance upgrade? Can this be done by any serviceable motorcycle dealership service department?

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Most dealerships should be able to do it, whether they are good at it or not is another question. Best to ask around your area, at race tracks near by, to get a feel for a particular dealers service department. Maybe post your city, someone on here could know a good one.

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It's very easy, you should save the cash and do it yourself. Just triple check your work. It's a good opportunity to understand the engine.

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What capacity of configuration knowledge is needed to install hotcams for ideal performance upgrade? Can this be done by any serviceable motorcycle dealership service department?


Just curious, what is your native language? Are you using Google translate or similar program? Your diction is interesting.

Sent from my SM-G935V using ThumperTalk mobile app

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Very easy if you understand what you are doing, takes about an hour. If you are not familiar, it can take a guy all day. There are multiple areas a lack of attention to detail can be catastrophic.

Read your service manual.

Spark plug out.

Timing and inspection plugs removed.

Engine at TDC on the power stroke.

Cam chain tensioner properly removed.

Note which cam cap bolt came from where.

Read your service manual.

Stuff a rag in the cam chain tunnel.

Tie a wire to the cam chain, do not let it fall into the engine. Keep a light pull on it at all times.

Check cam clearances.

Read your service manual.

Ensure the cam timing marks liine up, tensioner in. Then rotate the engine 720 degrees (back to TDC on the power stroke) do this several times to ensure you have it right.

When putting the valve cover on, snug the bolts, do not crank down on them, they are shoulder bottoming type.

Read your service manual.

 

Did I mention, read your service manual? ;)

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3 hours ago, HeavyRotation said:


Just curious, what is your native language? Are you using Google translate or similar program? Your diction is interesting.

Sent from my SM-G935V using ThumperTalk mobile app
 

If you like his diction, you'd love my locution. :smirk:

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2 hours ago, Bermudacat said:

If you like his diction, you'd love my locution. :smirk:

whoa! whoa! whoa! let's keep this pg-13!

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17 hours ago, William1 said:

Very easy if you understand what you are doing, takes about an hour. If you are not familiar, it can take a guy all day. There are multiple areas a lack of attention to detail can be catastrophic.

Read your service manual.

Spark plug out.

Timing and inspection plugs removed.

Engine at TDC on the power stroke.

Cam chain tensioner properly removed.

Note which cam cap bolt came from where.

Read your service manual.

Stuff a rag in the cam chain tunnel.

Tie a wire to the cam chain, do not let it fall into the engine. Keep a light pull on it at all times.

Check cam clearances.

Read your service manual.

Ensure the cam timing marks liine up, tensioner in. Then rotate the engine 720 degrees (back to TDC on the power stroke) do this several times to ensure you have it right.

When putting the valve cover on, snug the bolts, do not crank down on them, they are shoulder bottoming type.

Read your service manual.

 

Did I mention, read your service manual? ;)

It's sometimes hard for us to imagine, but for someone who's not been in the top end of an overhead cam engine, that all could be very intimidating. 

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2 minutes ago, bucket list said:

It's sometimes hard for us to imagine, but for someone who's not been in the top end of an overhead cam engine, that all could be very intimidating. 

Absolutely. A n00b's first time, they should be very anal retentive about each step. Clean bike and environment, take time, study, think.

While a pro can do it in an hour easily, if you are not a pro, be prepared to take all day. Do not rush, fully understand each step.

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It's intimidating the first time, for sure. But if you can change your own oil and spark plugs, follow directions and double check your work twice, it's doable. :)

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Mine went in without any changes to shims, YMMV.  Measure and record valve lash before and after.  If lash gets tighter or looser than allowable limits, appropriate shims will be needed.

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