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Hi, was hoping to get some help with choosing new tires for my DRZ400SM 2005, I have a some on my mind, but there are a few problems.

So my bike has Excel rims, front 3.5"(RK EXCEL J17 M/C X MT3.50 DOT 181 JAPAN 1 05), rear 4.5"(RK EXCEL J17 M/C X MT4.50 DOT 181 JAPAN 12 04).

I was hoping to get some suggestions for some 90/10 asphalt/dirt tires for mostly riding around, some twisties, but no track or very hardcore riding, so longer lasting might be better than super sticky.

I already have a set of S wheels for real dirt riding, but still need the SM ones to not be completely awful on dirt as there are occasional times I have to go on dirt with them(For example a kilometer every time I go front or to my house)

I was looking at the Michelin Pilot Power 3, but the only choice for the rear is 160/60, which I have heard is too wide.

Another one I was looking at was Michelin Pilot Road 4, any experience with it?

Thanks for your help, have been surfing the forums for a decent time and seen how helpful people are.

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I know the Michelin pilot power from when I was riding my sport touring bike,
The pilot road have a harder compound and will last longer than the pilot power. They still are sticky tire but I wouldn't bring them off road. Im sure they are better alternatives.

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What kind of dirt do you have to do? If it's just gravel roads or similar that you need to take to get to the next road then a street tire will work, just don't go too fast or lean the bike over much in a turn. I've got Rosso III's on my SM and have taken it on some light gravel roads. They worked just fine as long as you aren't pushing it. If you're wanting to use it for an occasional trail then a light dual sport tire would definitely be more appropriate.

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1 minute ago, Wily said:

What kind of dirt do you have to do? If it's just gravel roads or similar that you need to take to get to the next road then a street tire will work, just don't go too fast or lean the bike over much in a turn. I've got Rosso III's on my SM and have taken it on some light gravel roads. They worked just fine as long as you aren't pushing it. If you're wanting to use it for an occasional trail then a light dual sport tire would definitely be more appropriate.

No, if I want to go to trails I can just switch to the S wheels. I just want it to not be like driving over butter on gravel roads, I live in the country side and there are times I need to go on gravel roads to get somewhere, I was mostly worried about them being too slippery, but I guess even with a slick tire you could go on gravel roads if you aren't going too fast in turns. 

I have heard that Pirelli's heat up slower? Also how are your tires holding up in terms of mileage? The tires that are on my one currently from the PO are Goldentyre GT260 and the back one's middle 1/3 has worn down completely while the 1/3 on both sides are still going strong, while the front tire seems to have barely worn down, I guess I have been riding too much on straight roads(Not many twisties around where I live) :rolleyes:

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I have PR4's, 26/24 psi.  Better than Avon Storm Ultra, don't get hot tacky like BT 003RS but do get very warm.  Track day riders sometimes complain the front chatters at the limit.  I ride like Monday is a workday.  Wear has been very good, like them better in the wet than Avon Storms or worse 003RS.

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The mileage you get out of a tire depends on the type of tire you get. As an example, Michelin's Pilot Road series are a sport-touring tire. These have long wear life but still offer lots of traction because of the multiple compounds on the edge vs middle of the tire. On the other hand, Michelin's Pilot Power series is more sporty. They'll give better grip and feel but will wear a lot faster. If you're the kind to really push it on the street or twisties then a sportier tire would be more beneficial. If you occasionally ride twisties but aren't pushing your limit and want to have a long erlife then a sport-touring tire will be better.  

 

Here's a good video explaining the different categories of street tires: Here

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What about having a Pilot Road 4 in the rear while a Pilot Power 3 in the front? Or will the Pilot Powers be harder to heat up for proper traction and worse in rain? I have seen that the front tire wears less than the rear, so having a front that wears more would work, because then it could be changed, maybe, at the same time.

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1 hour ago, Newjorciks said:

What about having a Pilot Road 4 in the rear while a Pilot Power 3 in the front? Or will the Pilot Powers be harder to heat up for proper traction and worse in rain? I have seen that the front tire wears less than the rear, so having a front that wears more would work, because then it could be changed, maybe, at the same time.

Yep I've seen a few people do that, it will get the two to wear close to even. the front is where you want the most grip since the rear just kinda follows the front in a turn anyway while the rear takes the beating on long highway stretches. Pilot Power will heat up easier than the Pilot Road because it has a softer compound. You are right the Pilot Power will perform worse in the rain. If you are commuting or riding in all kinds of weather I'd go with Pilot Roads for both (and they are still plenty sticky for the occasional backroad), if it's a mix of commute and backroads then Road in the back and Power in the front is a good compromise of durability and grip, if you're just hitting fun roads mostly then you can either run the Road in the back and Power in the front for some extra life or Power for both front and rear if you want all the grip. 

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1 minute ago, Wily said:

Yep I've seen a few people do that, it will get the two to wear close to even. the front is where you want the most grip since the rear just kinda follows the front in a turn anyway while the rear takes the beating on long highway stretches. Pilot Power will heat up easier than the Pilot Road because it has a softer compound. You are right the Pilot Power will perform worse in the rain. If you are commuting or riding in all kinds of weather I'd go with Pilot Roads for both (and they are still plenty sticky for the occasional backroad), if it's a mix of commute and backroads then Road in the back and Power in the front is a good compromise of durability and grip, if you're just hitting fun roads mostly then you can either run the Road in the back and Power in the front for some extra life or Power for both front and rear if you want all the grip. 

Thanks for the help, I will probably go the road in back, power in front way. I don't commute on it, just ride around and occasionally go to some twisties. Don't ride in the rain with it either and if I get caught up in it I can just be more careful. Personally dislike the way front road one looks, don't like the sideways cuts on it(Ones the back only has few of), so that is just another reason to get the powers in the front :goofy:

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