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Hey guys, so ive been deciding if i should get the TTr230. I like the price with the dealers around here, but im scared of the whole carburetor thing. So my question is how much work do i need to put into the carburetor( every ride, every 1,000miles?). And is it a expensive and a hard process. So far ive only ridden Fuel injected. And the other bike that i would consider if I dont like the carburetor thing is the wr250r. I know one is dual sport and the other is trail but that doesent matter for me. 

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The TT-R 230 uses a very basic carburetor, nothing like a Keihin FCR common on many motocross race bikes,

unlike a high performance application it has no accelerator pump or throttle position sensor.

The air/fuel screw is adjusted and sealed at the factory, only the idle speed is adjustable.

 

If you don't plan on installing an aftermarket exhaust or removing some air inlet restrictions, (which could require a re-jet) 

keep the engine stock you'll likely never have to adjust anything unless riding at higher elevations or, in below freezing ambiant temperature.

 

Always use fresh gas (ethanol free, or else use an ethanol treatment) and some fuel stabilizer before putting the bike

in prolonged storage and you likely won't have to service the carburetor for many many years either.

Edited by mlatour

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53 minutes ago, mlatour said:

The TT-R 230 uses a very basic carburetor, nothing like a Keihin FCR common on many motocross race bikes,

unlike a high performance application it has no accelerator pump or throttle position sensor.

The air/fuel screw is adjusted and sealed at the factory, only the idle speed is adjustable.

 

If you don't plan on installing an aftermarket exhaust or removing some air inlet restrictions, (which could require a re-jet) 

keep the engine stock you'll likely never have to adjust anything unless riding at higher elevations or, in below freezing ambiant temperature.

 

Always use fresh gas (ethanol free, or else use an ethanol treatment) and some fuel stabilizer before putting the bike

in prolonged storage and you likely won't have to service the carburetor for many many years either.

Oh ok I see, I think you just made me want to buy the bike now. I was scared of it at first but now i understand it isnt so bad. Thanks :thumbsup:

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Take proper care of the bike and you may never have to touch the carb. Keep fuel stabilizer inn your fuel. Run the bike at least once a month for 20 minutes. If it is going to sit for a long time, drain the fuel tank and fog it. Remove the carb, remove the float bowl carefully and fully dry it out. Then you can store it for a year or more with no attention. I have engines that are close to forty years old and the carbs, never opened. Those that have problems, ride and then park the bike for six months with no care or servicing. They are asking for trouble.

You will be fine.

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Yep small engines (with their small carburetor passaways) can be finicky if not always run on fresh gas.

 

In other forums I keep reading about folks with lawn mowers and snow blowers that won't start after more than 6 months in storage.

My rule of thumb is to start and run every single power equipment I own with fresh gas (Sta-Bil treated) at least once every 2 months.

As William mentioned, I also have never had to service any carburetor on my 15+ year old generator, lawnmower, chain saw etc.

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