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AER 48 conversion to spring?

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Anyone try the spring conversion kit for the AER 48 forks that come on the 17 bikes?  If so, How did you like it?  The AER fork is a great fork, no doubt....just curious to hear thoughts.

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I race off-road and have been very happy with the consistent feel of the spring conversion. If I was solely racing moto, I probably wouldn't bother. Here's what I posted in another thread:

 

 

 

 

I did 60 hours on my aer and had 3 revalves. Couldn't get along with the inconsistent feel. As the race chopped up more the fork would ramp up and become stiffer. Air is unstable and a 3 psi change is as noticeable as a spring rate change. Some events would change up to 10psi. I don't like going into a corner and it feeling different each time. This combined with the extra stiction had me lacking confidence. Each air pressure change would need the the comp and rebound adjusted to make it work so when the air pressure is changing depending how fast those forks are going up and down it becomes unpredictable.

 

Anyway I now have the kroozetune spring conversion and could not be happier or more confident in my bike. No stiction issues and the most consistent feel. I really wish I did it after 10 hours and I know it will be my first modification to my 2018. It was a process though and I had to go through it. If anyone is thinking of a spring conversion, do it and don't bag it until you have tried it.

 

 

 

 

 

I now have 40 hours on the spring conversion and still convinced it has been effective for me. That doesn't mean it's for everyone. I personally like not having to check air pressures before putting my bike in Parc ferme and not needing to make many clicker adjustments throughout the race or adjusting air pressures. The single biggest benefit for me has been consistency. In some areas like rocks and bottoming capability, I would say the air was probably better. It certainly has its strengths but the spring was just so simple to setup and is really easy to get used to. There is also no stiction and it reacts consistently. For me knowing exactly what it's going to do over a variety of terrain and conditions has been valuable. Kroozetune spring conversion was $600 aud so prob $450 usd.

 

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This was my point before about stalking red , a pointless post in a section where people want info not banter

Sent from my XT1650 using ThumperTalk mobile app

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Spring kit is to heavy, makes the bike unbalanced i feelt when i tried it. Ohlins inserts save you 1kg and with that the bike was still balanced

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I had FC install the WP spring conversion and revalve on both ends on my 2017 XC-F 350. I am very pleased with the feel of the spring fork kit. The front end is more planted and doesn't washout on me in the flat corners. The forks no longer bounce over the choppy stuff. That being said, I rode my friends 2017 250SX the other day and his AER forks were set up just as good as mine. He has been a motorcycle tech and a racer for over 40 years and he knows how to set his bikes up. I didn't have the time or the knowledge to tinker with mine to get it right. 

 

Edited by Brilloman

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You can't feel which one out of the spring and the revalve gave you the feel you like , just saying you had 2 things done so the conversion can't be given the credit

winning by 4:1 lol

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Does anyone not find it interesting that all the ktm factory teams (off-road and mx)are running cone valves and not aer? If I had the spare coin for a set of cone valves, I'd buy them.

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27 minutes ago, Kato7 said:

Does anyone not find it interesting that all the ktm factory teams (off-road and mx)are running cone valves and not aer? If I had the spare coin for a set of cone valves, I'd buy them.

KTM team run spring 52mm forks based on CV. Husky Ice One factory team run Cone Valve AER forks, 48 and 52mm.

Cone valve is made in two version since 1 year back, one spring and one dual chamber air.

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KTM team run spring 52mm forks based on CV. Husky Ice One factory team run Cone Valve AER forks, 48 and 52mm.
Cone valve is made in two version since 1 year back, one spring and one dual chamber air.


Cheers for that. What did you find unbalanced about the spring? Was it left to right or front to back? And are you talking about when the bike is in the air?

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30 minutes ago, Kato7 said:

 


Cheers for that. What did you find unbalanced about the spring? Was it left to right or front to back? And are you talking about when the bike is in the air?

It was mainly over jumps, but as soon as front end was of the ground it wanted to dip back down a bit quicker then in a balanced bike. I have ran bikes with CV spring forks and AER with Ohlins spring inserts in and those did not have the same feeling. That 1 extra kg (2lbs) was enough to make it feel unbalanced.

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On ‎8‎/‎14‎/‎2017 at 6:48 AM, mog said:

You can't feel which one out of the spring and the revalve gave you the feel you like , just saying you had 2 things done so the conversion can't be given the credit

winning by 4:1 lol
 

That is fair to say. In theory a better comparison would be made if I had revalved the AER forks first and then had the spring conversion performed. When they ordered the WP spring conversion kit they ordered it with the correct spring rate for my weight as well which saved me a few bucks on the conversion. Like I said I rode my friends 2017 250SX which was set up for woods racing the same day and his suspension was just as good if not a little more supple than mine. He is about 40 pounds lighter than me and runs 100 pounds of air so his dampening adjustments and oil height is based on that much air pressure. I think that a reasonable assumption to be made in reference to the AER forks is that if you have the knowledge and the time to play with them they can be made to work as well or better than a spring fork. I do not think that it is as easy as adjusting the air pressure and clicker settings for your weight and riding style. I think that internal shim changes and oil height are also required to get them to perform as good as they can be.    

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On ‎8‎/‎15‎/‎2017 at 9:00 AM, AEES said:

KTM team run spring 52mm forks based on CV. Husky Ice One factory team run Cone Valve AER forks, 48 and 52mm.

Cone valve is made in two version since 1 year back, one spring and one dual chamber air.

The 5x US National Enduro Champion runs the spring version of the cone valve forks. It may be because they have already done the development work on his set up and the advantage of the AER CV fork is not worth the time and effort required to develop all new settings.  

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Most top pros run the cone valve , have done for many years

winning by 4:1 lol

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11 minutes ago, mog said:

Most top pros run the cone valve , have done for many years

winning by 4:1 lol
 

But but but you said pros run air?!?!?!?!

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On ktm dummy , nargle won on works aer but he's the only one so far

winning by 4:1 lol

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