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What brand chain and sprockets should I buy for my 2015 yz250f

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Perhaps it was a fluke but the only brand sprocket I've had a issue with is JT on the countershaft of my YZ125.

Simply spinning the wheel/chain by hand, it was extremely noisy and you could visibly see a dis-engagement notchiness as the chain rolled off.

Tossed it in the spare parts bin and ordered something else.

 

IMO I'd say getting a quality chain is more important than the brand or material (aluminium or steel) of the sprockets.

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DID vt2 chain, sunstar works z rear sprocket. for my bike (KTM) I use a sunstar front sprocket because its the stock thickness and that's very important on it.

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2 hours ago, DarrellH3 said:

I've always used Primary Drive from Rocky Mountain. $85 for the set and you can't beat the quality. If you ride mostly track ti may be looking for a non oring. I've never ran their non oring chains.

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I'll second that, the Primary drive stuff is excellent bang for the buck. Unless you ride extremely sandy or mud conditions you don't need a steel sprocket. 

Go with a non-oring chain on a 250F, especially if riding mostly tracks.

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Supersprox sprockets and DID o-ring. Best value/wear.

I did 200 hours on the all steel Supersprox rear. It was on 3 different bikes and ended being sold on a bike still with meat left on it. Went through 3 chains on it. 

In comparison JT and primary drive I usually get 50 hours out of. 

Edited by Vintage Not Pimpage
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DID narrow x-ring chain and iron man or super sprox sprocket. The lack of maint. And longevity are hard to beat.

 

I'm skeptical very many people can notice the weight of steel sprockets or power difference of o-ring chain. 

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Some might need the strength and durability for the conditions they ride and could care lees about weight. Cool. For MX, the manufactures and factory teams don't burn the midnight oil looking to shave ounces off these motorcycles every year because "nobody can feel it". Chains and sprockets are unsprung weight, worst kind on a bike. Too much unsprung  effects how a bike handles, steers, accelerates and the load/performance on the suspension. 

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I've also had luck with SuperSprox and an RK chain. The SuperSprox seem to last longer, they're a little heavier, but in my opinion it's better than replacing aluminum sprockets constantly. My 450 ate up sprockets fast compared to my 250 two stroke. Maybe a 250f wouldn't be as hard on a sprocket as a 450f, but I can't be for certain. At this point I feel like it's the torque of these moto thumpers that chew through them faster.

Renthal also offers a sprocket like SuperSprox. I think it's called the twin ring. I ran that on my 450 and it seemed to hold up just as good as the SuperSprox....so there's options.

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I've also had luck with SuperSprox and an RK chain. The SuperSprox seem to last longer, they're a little heavier, but in my opinion it's better than replacing aluminum sprockets constantly. My 450 ate up sprockets fast compared to my 250 two stroke. Maybe a 250f wouldn't be as hard on a sprocket as a 450f, but I can't be for certain. At this point I feel like it's the torque of these moto thumpers that chew through them faster.

Renthal also offers a sprocket like SuperSprox. I think it's called the twin ring. I ran that on my 450 and it seemed to hold up just as good as the SuperSprox....so there's options.

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https://motocrossactionmag.com/mxa-team-tested-renthal-twinring-aluminumsteel-spocket/

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4 hours ago, Concep29 said:

Some might need the strength and durability for the conditions they ride and could care lees about weight. Cool. For MX, the manufactures and factory teams don't burn the midnight oil looking to shave ounces off these motorcycles every year because "nobody can feel it". Chains and sprockets are unsprung weight, worst kind on a bike. Too much unsprung  effects how a bike handles, steers, accelerates and the load/performance on the suspension. 

I'm on board with all of this, but I am still skeptical that most mx riders could realize any real difference, especially on the chain. I give slightly more credence to the heavier sprocket. I know I can't feel the differences and I am local b-rider speed. 


Have you tried an O-ring chain and twin ring or steel sprocket?

I, being mainly an mx'er,  ran regular chains and aluminum sprockets for a long time-under the same premise you are advocating. Once I switched I would never go back. 

What do you think the weight difference is between a super sprox twin ring(or all steel for that matter) an aluminum sprocket? I think ironman are actually the lightest if you do go steel even lighter then the twin rings...

How about the horsepower difference between a o-ring and standard chain on a 250f? How about the difference once the standard chain starts becoming slapped out because of dirt and grit, and it didn't have a meticulous owner?

Also, factory teams do all kinds of stuff I wouldn't do. If maint time and cost were no issue, I would run the best race gas, change my knobbies every 2 moto's, run thin graphics(weight reduction), all TI bolts etc... But practicality sets in 

Not trying to be argumentative either...genuinely interested in your answers

Edited by ericz103
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1 hour ago, ericz103 said:

I'm on board with all of this, but I am still skeptical that most mx riders could realize any real difference, especially on the chain. I give slightly more credence to the heavier sprocket. I know I can't feel the differences and I am local b-rider speed. 


Have you tried an O-ring chain and twin ring or steel sprocket?

I, being mainly an mx'er,  ran regular chains and aluminum sprockets for a long time-under the same premise you are advocating. Once I switched I would never go back. 

What do you think the weight difference is between a super sprox twin ring(or all steel for that matter) an aluminum sprocket? I think ironman are actually the lightest if you do go steel even lighter then the twin rings...

How about the horsepower difference between a o-ring and standard chain on a 250f? How about the difference once the standard chain starts becoming slapped out because of dirt and grit, and it didn't have a meticulous owner?

Also, factory teams do all kinds of stuff I wouldn't do. If maint time and cost were no issue, I would run the best race gas, change my knobbies every 2 moto's, run thin graphics(weight reduction), all TI bolts etc... But practicality sets in 

Not trying to be argumentative either...genuinely interested in your answers

I don't take it as argumentative,  little more in depth than the OP probably needed, but people also come here to learn.

Preface, I'm 100% Moto, don't ride trails, woods, or desert. Mostly the hardpack tracks of AZ and SoCal. 30yrs.  I have had had almost every size of 2T and 4T bike, currently a 250F, 450F and 250T. My needs and wants could be completely different than an off-roader, as I mentioned in previous post. 

I've had o rings and steel sprockets. The last steel (combo) was a supersprox. Weight difference? It was 3-4 times heavier than my Renthal Ulltralite. An Ironman may very well be as light as Aluminum, never used one and would try one if that's the case. Do my best to not to add weight or drag on the 250F, and orings do add more drag than a conventional chain. They are a bit heavier ( rotating mass), little wider and have found them to be a bit harder on the chain guide and swingarm rub. I can get nice longevity out of a conventional set-up being a "meticulous owner"

Horsepower..on my 250F ( not 450s or 250Ts), it's seat of the pants and conventional wisdom. I've read .5Hp, may seem trivial and a single part may not be noticeable to the average rider but a combo of heavy duty parts IS. Chain & sprockets, tubes & tires, guides, wheel hardware, skid plates etc can add up quick in MX. If it weights more than the stock part I'll use something else. Again, my presonal preference for the small bore bike. Ask your Doctor what's right for you. 

Factory bikes live in a different galaxy.. even so, Interesting that on a 52Hp 250F, teams still use Aluminum sprockets and non ring chains. 

 

Some good reading on the "hidden evils of unsprung weight" 

http://motocrossactionmag.com/dealing-with-the-hidden-evils-of-unsprung-weight/

 

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I think your location may lead to easier chain maintenance. In Indiana even if you only ride moto you are going to hit loam, mud, sand, deeper dirt in general I imagine. Cleaning a chain well, messing with chain lube is a hassle. I wash my bike spray wd40 and I'm good with a sealed chain.

I totally understand how stuff adds up, but I'm not afraid to add weight if it is worth it to me. Ex..foldable levers, radiator braces, o-ring chain.  I googled ironman sprockets real quick it said the average 520 50t weighed 1.1lbs. Twin rings weigh some where in between that and full steel. I run the super sprox twin ring because they last forever and look good.

Also, I feel I can comp any .5hp lost, easily through other mods. I'm a fairly light guy on a 250f and my bike has plenty of power.

The only reason to run o-ring chains and steel sprockets is longevity...the last thing on a factories team mind. 

You are right though, to each their own. Both styles have their place.

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Some might need the strength and durability for the conditions they ride and could care lees about weight. Cool. For MX, the manufactures and factory teams don't burn the midnight oil looking to shave ounces off these motorcycles every year because "nobody can feel it". Chains and sprockets are unsprung weight, worst kind on a bike. Too much unsprung  effects how a bike handles, steers, accelerates and the load/performance on the suspension. 


I would agree; but for pros. For the other 99% of us, nobody is going to notice.

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15 hours ago, XRalways said:

 


I would agree; but for pros. For the other 99% of us, nobody is going to notice.

 

Actually no. Allot of Pro's are really horrible at feedback on the bike. A fast rider isn’t necessarily a good test rider, discounting such a large number of riders because they're not Pro's isn't fair or realistic.

 

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