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nitrogen pressure vintage gas shocks

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Don't bother with those old things,,

   just send them to me!:rolleyes:

             I stick 100psi each  in rebuilt XR shocks,, not sure about Foxy's tho......

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The N2 pressure is one of the tuning variables. As the pressure increases, the damping curve also changes slightly. Higher relative base pressures will cause the damping curve to raise bit more quickly as the shaft displaces fluid and the internal pressure raises. As a starting point I use 150psi. I think 125 to 175 is pretty common but have seen pressures in the low 200's. I am sure you know, but never use air. The high partial pressures of oxygen cause your oil to degrade (oxidize) at an accelerated pace.

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On 8/6/2017 at 2:48 PM, pcnsd said:

The N2 pressure is one of the tuning variables. As the pressure increases, the damping curve also changes slightly. Higher relative base pressures will cause the damping curve to raise bit more quickly as the shaft displaces fluid and the internal pressure raises. As a starting point I use 150psi. I think 125 to 175 is pretty common but have seen pressures in the low 200's. I am sure you know, but never use air. The high partial pressures of oxygen cause your oil to degrade (oxidize) at an accelerated pace.

This is right on from the circa 1978 Fox Shox owner's manual. :thumbsup: Their range is from 100 psi on street and trials shocks to 200 psi for motocross. Fwiw, the manual says "Contrary to some magazine reports, changing pressure does not change damping".

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