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Handlebar Riser Question Re: Lowering Bike

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Hi, I know there's a ton of lowering threads, but I looked through a lot of them and never found the answer to my question. I've had my 2014 DRZ400SM for about 3 months now and I just can't force my short inseam to get used to the height. I can ride just fine, but I can't reverse out of parking spots, I have to use the kickstand to get on and off, and it's just a generally awkward and unstable feeling at stop signs/lights. I already have the low gel seat. I never plan on serious off-roading because I have my XT225 for that.

Long story short, I'm ordering some 2" lowering links. But how much do I need to drop the front to match the rear? I read one vague reference to lowering the front 1/3 as much as the rear, but is that accurate??

And I noticed my front shocks are already practically touching my handlebars, so I'll need risers. I'm happy with the handlebar height tho so I don't really want to go any higher than necessary. Tusk offers 0.6" and 1.2" options, and Rox offers pivoting 2" risers. If anyone could point me in the right direction that'd be great. Thanks!

rox2_pivot_risersfor78_handlebars.jpg

tus_10_han_ris_kit_1_1-8_bar.jpg

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You're going to have to be careful and accurately measure the distance between the tire and front fender and leave enough clearance for full travel. You can't slide your forks beyond that distance.

 

How tall are you? Do you have any other dirt bike riding buddies?

 

A paradigm that some new riders often have is they think the bike is too tall. Sometimes all they need is to be shown to slide their butts over a little and put 1 foot down, that's all you really need. Practice your balance backing up at home if needed. You should stive to learn to do it without HAVING to put your feet down. Basically kick off, glide, put a pivot foot down to turn. All those people at the stop light that have both feet down and take off Superman style have no business on a bike and will likely die a horribly gruesome death someday as a result.

 

Sent from my XT1650 using ThumperTalk mobile app

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I'm 5'8" but with an abnormally short inseam. I do have a dirt-bike buddy, he rides an even taller DRZ400S, but he's 6'2" and he agrees I look super awkward at a standstill. I do slide over and use one foot, its about the only way I can touch at all. Not being able to backup isn't a balance issue, I literally can't get enough traction on the ground with my booties to move it. I've put almost 2000 miles on the bike and it's not getting less awkward. I've done the research and I'm fairly certain I want to do this. I simply don't need a full foot of travel, this is my road bike and I'm a super low-key rider anyway. I just need to know how much to drop the front to match the 2" lowering links in the rear.

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I would think that the answer to keep things as normal as possible would be 2" to match the back.  Most forks that I have dealt with are tapered between the top and bottom triple clamp, and again below the bottom triple clamp .  I would think you would start getting into that area before the risers would do you any good.  You should call a suspension shop and see if they can internally lower the fork for you, or browse the web and see if someone can provide instructions to do it yourself if you are confident.   

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I would think that the answer to keep things as normal as possible would be 2" to match the back.  Most forks that I have dealt with are tapered between the top and bottom triple clamp, and again below the bottom triple clamp .  I would think you would start getting into that area before the risers would do you any good.  You should call a suspension shop and see if they can internally lower the fork for you, or browse the web and see if someone can provide instructions to do it yourself if you are confident.   


There is a slight taper but it's minimal, do you think it's enough to preclude sliding the clamps down?IMG_0192.JPG

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simple answer .. you dont need to lower the front at all .. and dropping the rear 1" and reducing the aspect ratio '10' on your next tire purchase would likely be plenty .. also, you dont need lowering links to drop the rear, you can loosen the shock collar and give it more sag, and no, your bike wont do anything other than squat lower if you do that .. look at it this way - if you suddenly gained 80lbs what would happen? ... the rear would sag lower and your feet would touch the ground no problem, you dont need to lower the front and you dont need lowering links to do it ..

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You have approximately 1 5/16 that the leg(not measuring the cap) can be above the top clamp surface.

That's considering the taper.

 

Sent from my XT1650 using ThumperTalk mobile app

 

 

 

 

 

Ok, I measured and I have 7/10" sticking out right now, so if the max is 1 5/16" I can still go down almost another inch. Since lowering links are so cheap, I think I'm gonna get a 2" set and a 1" set so I can try both out. And I'll get the smallest bar riser (0.6") since the clamps can't be slid down very far anyway? Does that sound reasonable to everyone?

 

I'm definitely not handy enough to modify the shocks myself, but I have a good relationship with my local shop, so if this doesn't work out I'll just take it to them. Thanks for all the help everyone.

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Have you set your rear sag yet? If you haven't, it may be set up for a heavier person right now. If you do lower the rear, I would just drive it afterwards and see how it feels to you, it may be fine without touching the front. Maybe someone has already lowered the front previous to you buying it

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