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Hi people, I have recently modded my 06 drz 400e carby,(fcr with ap pump rod on the outside) by removing coast dohicky, wiring the Ap to throttle and grinding Ap diaphragm rivet which has worked a treat. No more bog and seems crisper. But i can screw the fuel mix screw all the way in and it won't die. The bike was previously jetted for an fmf power bomb and fmf pipe but was sold to me with stock system but jetting wasn't changed back. I figured with the coast thingy gone bigger jets would be ok. So my questions are...

1. is there a problem i need to fix re fuel screw given it still idles/runs fine

2. i ride at between 1000' and 2000ft asl what jetting and needle clip position would be best. 

cheers

Chris

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Hi people, I have recently modded my 06 drz 400e carby,(fcr with ap pump rod on the outside) by removing coast dohicky, wiring the Ap to throttle and grinding Ap diaphragm rivet which has worked a treat. No more bog and seems crisper. But i can screw the fuel mix screw all the way in and it won't die. The bike was previously jetted for an fmf power bomb and fmf pipe but was sold to me with stock system but jetting wasn't changed back. I figured with the coast thingy gone bigger jets would be ok. So my questions are...

1. is there a problem i need to fix re fuel screw given it still idles/runs fine

2. i ride at between 1000' and 2000ft asl what jetting and needle clip position would be best. 

cheers

Chris

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Fuel screw settings in the 'book' are recommended starting points. Every bike is different, as is the temp and altitude. Set the screw according to this method. Do it with the bike fully heated up.
Gently turn the fuel screw all the way in. Now back it out two turns. Start the bike and fully warm it up, go for a 10 minute ride. Set the idle knob to speed to 1,500~1,800 RPM as best you can (I know, without a tach this is tough, just set it to were it idles relatively smoothly).  Once warmed, slow the idle speed (knob) to the lowest possible speed.
*** When turning the fuel screw, keep an accurate 'count' of the amount you are turning it and record it in case you have to reset it for some reason. Makes life easier when you can just set it from notes Vs. going through the procedure again.***
Turn the fuel screw in until the idle becomes rough or the bike stalls.
if it stalled, open the screw about 1/4 more turn. Restart it and slowly screw it in till you can just perceive a change.
If the screw can be turned all the way in and the bike still idles perfectly and does not stall, then you need to go down a size in pilot jet.
Now very slowly, open the fuel screw till the idle is smooth. Blip the throttle, let the bike return to an idle, wait say ten seconds. Confirm it is the same smooth idle.
If the screw has to be opened more than 3 turns to get a smooth idle, you need to go up a size in pilot jet.
If you find it does not stall with the larger jet but has to be open more than three turns with the smaller pilot jet, put the larger one in and set the fuel screw at 1/2 turn.
If the idle speed increased, adjust the idle speed knob to return the bike to a real slow idle speed. You must then re-visit the fuel screw. Keep doing this till the fuel screw is opened just enough to provide a nice steady idle at the lowest possible RPM. Once this is done, increase the idle speed to the normal one for your bike, typically about 1,850 rpm

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Fuel screw settings in the 'book' are recommended starting points. Every bike is different, as is the temp and altitude. Set the screw according to this method. Do it with the bike fully heated up.
Gently turn the fuel screw all the way in. Now back it out two turns. Start the bike and fully warm it up, go for a 10 minute ride. Set the idle knob to speed to 1,500~1,800 RPM as best you can (I know, without a tach this is tough, just set it to were it idles relatively smoothly).  Once warmed, slow the idle speed (knob) to the lowest possible speed.
*** When turning the fuel screw, keep an accurate 'count' of the amount you are turning it and record it in case you have to reset it for some reason. Makes life easier when you can just set it from notes Vs. going through the procedure again.***
Turn the fuel screw in until the idle becomes rough or the bike stalls.
if it stalled, open the screw about 1/4 more turn. Restart it and slowly screw it in till you can just perceive a change.
If the screw can be turned all the way in and the bike still idles perfectly and does not stall, then you need to go down a size in pilot jet.
Now very slowly, open the fuel screw till the idle is smooth. Blip the throttle, let the bike return to an idle, wait say ten seconds. Confirm it is the same smooth idle.
If the screw has to be opened more than 3 turns to get a smooth idle, you need to go up a size in pilot jet.
If you find it does not stall with the larger jet but has to be open more than three turns with the smaller pilot jet, put the larger one in and set the fuel screw at 1/2 turn.
If the idle speed increased, adjust the idle speed knob to return the bike to a real slow idle speed. You must then re-visit the fuel screw. Keep doing this till the fuel screw is opened just enough to provide a nice steady idle at the lowest possible RPM. Once this is done, increase the idle speed to the normal one for your bike, typically about 1,850 rpm

Excellent procedure recap, thanks

Sent from my SM-G930V using ThumperTalk mobile app

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