DR350 Carb Problems?

So I can start my bike cold as long as it has been sitting for a while in one kick. But when I turn it off and try to turn on it doesn't want to start... can the carb not be delivering enough fuel maybe the pilot screw isn't good? Any ideas also it runs like if it needs more gas in the beginning so low idle with choke all the way out then I turn the idle screw a bit and seems to fix it and it runs perfectly just very difficult to start I maybe have messed the carb up and not adjusted it correctly 

Edited by SmashingTrees

What year and model? There are a couple different carbs.

Mine's the '90 dirt-only model with the TM33 pumper carb. They can be much harder to start when hot. Make sure the choke is off (pushed all the way in). Hold down the decomp lever and give it 8-10 good solid kicks. Then let go of the decomp lever so it stays in without holding it. Then slooowly kick it over until the decomp lever releases. Then let the kickstart return to near top position, slowly kick it over until you get resistance, let it return to top again then give it a good hard kick. If it doesn't start in a few more kicks, go back to the first step and kick it good with that decomp lever in to clear stuff out.

Sometimes when it's really hot and hard to start, I turn the fuel petcock OFF and repeat the steps above. Once it's running I turn the fuel back on. It actually wants a little bit less fuel when it's hot. Reducing my idle speed helps sometimes when hot.

Getting the idle air control screw set correctly is important too. Once hot, reduce idle until it's near stalling, then turn the idle control screw on the bottom of the carb in until the RPMs stop going up. If they don't go up, back the screw out. Then reduce idle until it's near stalling, and repeat the previous steps until you have the bike idling as low as possible with the idle control screw turn in far as you can. Should be around 1.5 turns out stock I think. Make sure to do this when the bike is HOT - after it's been running 10-15 minutes!

should never have to kick more than a couple times.

never needs any priming kicks either, all that does is flood the carb.

if its hard to start when hot, open the throttle wide to start

if my bike took more than 1 or 2 kicks every time i started it, i'd get an electric start

54 minutes ago, plugeye said:

if my bike took more than 1 or 2 kicks every time i started it, i'd get an electric start

My bike usually starts after one kick cold but the weird thing is that the bike needs to sit in between start ups and it takes forever and when it starts the bike runs like it has no gas. The bike is a 1991 dirt model and has a mikuni carb. I don't know what an idle screw is but on my carb I have a screw that when I turn it it opens or closes the throttle as I move it 

2 hours ago, plugeye said:

should never have to kick more than a couple times.

never needs any priming kicks either, all that does is flood the carb.

if its hard to start when hot, open the throttle wide to start

Sure, if everyone's bike were in top condition and perfectly tuned, we wouldn't need the shenanigans.

Lots of older bikes in varying conditions, aftermarket parts, etc. and most of us work with the time & gear we've got.

Just based on my experience starting this thing on blazing hot days in the woods, I can get it started up pretty quickly if I prime using the above method. My bike is not in perfect condition or tune, but if all else fails of course it's worth trying.

2 minutes ago, Tekime said:

Sure, if everyone's bike were in top condition and perfectly tuned, we wouldn't need the shenanigans.

Lots of older bikes in varying conditions, aftermarket parts, etc. and most of us work with the time & gear we've got.

Just based on my experience starting this thing on blazing hot days in the woods, I can get it started up pretty quickly if I prime using the above method. My bike is not in perfect condition or tune, but if all else fails of course it's worth trying.

Yeah I will try that method!! Thanks for the tips : )

14 hours ago, Tekime said:

Sure, if everyone's bike were in top condition and perfectly tuned, we wouldn't need the shenanigans.

Lots of older bikes in varying conditions, aftermarket parts, etc. and most of us work with the time & gear we've got.

Just based on my experience starting this thing on blazing hot days in the woods, I can get it started up pretty quickly if I prime using the above method. My bike is not in perfect condition or tune, but if all else fails of course it's worth trying.

even so, in my experience:

rebuild the carb to stock

airbox stock with snorkel

some sort of muffler & ignition operational

it should behave properly

Can't argue with that, although sometimes I'm sure my bike is just in a bad mood! Low on oil and valve clearance getting out of spec have caused some struggles for me too.

Just a theory, but I notice on the older carbs the flatslide gets worn, which I suspect might be letting some extra air in? Cleaning/rebuild don't do much about that. I'm trying to rebuild the carb on a pretty grimy spare bike now and the slide looks extremely worn. In fact the entire carb looks like it went to hell and back and both the vacuum ports on the sides have cavities in them from, well I have no idea how the metal itself corroded away, but I'm hoping it's still usable assuming I ever get the thing cleaned up.

9 hours ago, Tekime said:

Can't argue with that, although sometimes I'm sure my bike is just in a bad mood! Low on oil and valve clearance getting out of spec have caused some struggles for me too.

Just a theory, but I notice on the older carbs the flatslide gets worn, which I suspect might be letting some extra air in? Cleaning/rebuild don't do much about that. I'm trying to rebuild the carb on a pretty grimy spare bike now and the slide looks extremely worn. In fact the entire carb looks like it went to hell and back and both the vacuum ports on the sides have cavities in them from, well I have no idea how the metal itself corroded away, but I'm hoping it's still usable assuming I ever get the thing cleaned up.

your right, the pumper carbs wear out. luckily you can buy a brand new one reasonably for $220? i believe

6 hours ago, plugeye said:

your right, the pumper carbs wear out. luckily you can buy a brand new one reasonably for $220? i believe

Yep right around there, I'll probably replace mine and swap my current carb to the "spare" bike eventually

Try letting idle for 30 seconds before shutting it down. This is pretty common on older carbureted bikes.

Maybe spark plug

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now