mferring1

2017 500 RR-S remove cam cover

16 posts in this topic

OK guys, never checked valve clearance before, but I have decided to give it a shot. However, after removing the spark plug lead and the 4 cover bolts, I am having a heck of a time figuring out how to get the cam cover out. The 500 engine is very tall and removal of the cover appears to be obstructed by the frame. Please tell me there is some trick to getting it out that I am too ignorant to know/figure out and that I don't have to pull the engine!

Many thanks for your help and experience.

Mark

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Never mind. Cut a bunch of ties and moved wires and eventually got the bugger out. Whew.....

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Thanks Johnny. I had done that too. This helps for actually checking the clearance, but was not a big factor, at least for me, in removing the  cam cover.

I did take the ignition off which I think did help with the clearance.

And boy, sure is "interesting" getting the spark plug out and in!

In your guys experience, do you have to pull the plug to do a clearance check? My dealer says that being at absolute TDC is not critical for the clearance check (obviously would be for timing if changing shims and removing the cam chain) as long as the intake valves are close to 45 deg up towards the rear and exhaust valves close to 45 deg up towards the front. From his perspective, this means the cam is at its smallest geometry (far from the actuation lobe) and is good for the clearance check.

 

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Mferring1,

I'd agree with your approach on TDC when checking. On most bikes I just get it close to TDC or when you can see the bottom of the lobe on the follower/bucket.

I haven't done mine on the Beta yet. I had read that loosening or removing a top motor mount helps also. I'll find out when I do mine.....

My KLR was like that, you had to finangle the cam cover around and eventually it came out, what a pain. They could have given you a bit more clearance and it'd be 90% easier.

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I also found that taking the throttle cable out of its housing really helped. There is a little strain relief metal piece routing the cable into the spring housing that got in the way. The really tight part is to the rear of the cam cover. I also took off the ignition, but not sure whether that was necessary. Will try without taking that off next time.

Also, I had to access the left intake cam lobe from the rear through the frame in order to perform the check. It was blocked from the right and left.

Have fun! Took me about 4 hours for the whole darn thing! I believe I can probably do it in about an hour now that I have the first experience.

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8 hours ago, mferring1 said:

I also found that taking the throttle cable out of its housing really helped. There is a little strain relief metal piece routing the cable into the spring housing that got in the way. The really tight part is to the rear of the cam cover. I also took off the ignition, but not sure whether that was necessary. Will try without taking that off next time.

Also, I had to access the left intake cam lobe from the rear through the frame in order to perform the check. It was blocked from the right and left.

Have fun! Took me about 4 hours for the whole darn thing! I believe I can probably do it in about an hour now that I have the first experience.

Did you need to actually perform any adjustments?  Were the valves all in spec?  

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This was at my first 30 hrs. And all were in spec.

Intake were a little tight. Both left and right were between .1 and .13. Spec is .1 to .175. So I will have to watch that.

Exhaust were right in the middle. Both left and right around .15.  Spec is .125 to .2.

Dealer told me that in his experience, the Betas tend to stay in spec for a long time. We will see.

Once I worked out my way of sliding the gauges between the cam and follower, it was actually pretty easy. Took me a while to figure it out though. I don't have a lot of experience in this type of engine maintenance, so I really took my time and was very cognizant of trying hard not to screw it up!

By the way, I have the narrow tip Bikemaster feeler set.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000WJ92E4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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Thanks.  Good to know all the information you have been sharing with us.  

 

I've been reading that the valves stay good for some time.  

I hope that because I don't need to spend too much time in the upper RPM ranges, that my valves will stay in spec. for a long time.  

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Yeah, me too. Amazing how little I use the upper rev range....especially after the experience on my WR250R where you are "always" in the upper rev range! I find I can spin my rear tire in almost any gear with the torque from this monster. Really fun.

Other thing I did that has made this bike perfect for me is to get it revalved for the really rocky slow going situation we have in the mountains of New Mexico. Even with backing off all the adjusters, I got tossed around alot that caused me to reduce my confidence in doing our fairly gnarly trails around here. My dealer recommended the revalve (used Stillwell Performance in Phoenix) as he is a racer and rider here and really knows these bikes.

Since the revalve (also reduced spring rate in front), the bike is really transformed. I can now crawl or fly over these heavily rocked trails with complete confidence. I weigh about 185 so I was hoping that the stock setup would be good for me. No so for our conditions. It would have probably been pretty good if it wasn't so rocky.

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There is a special screw in the bottom of the crank case for lockingg the engine into TDC once you've found it. 

Spin the crank until your cams indicate TDC. Remove screw and set aside thick copper washer. Reinstall screw - you're locked. Just don't forget to take it out and try to spin the motor over with the starter.

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Thanks Motoxgiant. I did use that this time, but don't think I will for future clearance checks. I do think I will use it for shim changes though to ensure I don't screw up the timing.

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it took me about a day or so to do mine, including doing all of my research, and working up to it. I was pretty carefull I guess.

I removed the motor mount, and anything elese that got in my way. the sparkplug boot was a pain, so I put a bit of silicon grease on it to help. I also bent up my feeler gauges but all was good, intake just about mid spec, exhaust was about bottom third of spec. I used a srewdriver and an ice pick to line up the bolts.

All was good, and she purrs like an italian kitten.

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I also zip tie the chain to cam sprockets. FWIW a good indicator of needing valve adjustment is when you have to crack the throttle to start motor. The only reason to go TDC at compression stroke is when you have to remove the cam. I don't even lock the motor. This is also a good time to replace the plug. 

I only removed cam so I could upgrade the decompression device. No need to remove for valve adjustment. Just lift cams far enough to R&R shims. Temp strip was a brain fart putting on the hollow area.

100_4321.JPG.473090496b77329ad544304617530e82.JPG

Also very important with the Beta is to make sure cams are flush against the keepers. It has to be pushed to the left until you feel it touch. Sounds simple but is easily overlooked on this motor. The cam chain tensioner is reset by just using the ball end of a 4mm allen wrench. 

100_4332.JPG.d20b1c3a901766758bb5953bdeb70a38.JPG

 

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1 minute ago, ballisticexchris said:

I also zip tie the chain to cam sprockets. FWIW a good indicator of needing valve adjustment is when you have to crack the throttle to start motor. The only reason to go TDC at compression stroke is when you have to remove the cam. I don't even lock the motor. This is also a good time to replace the plug. 

I only removed cam so I could upgrade the decompression device. No need to remove for valve adjustment. Just lift cams far enough to R&R shims. Temp strip was a brain fart putting on the hollow area.

100_4321.JPG.473090496b77329ad544304617530e82.JPG

Also very important with the Beta is to make sure cams are flush against the keepers. It has to be pushed to the left until you feel it touch. Sounds simple but is easily overlooked on this motor. The cam chain tensioner is reset by just using the ball end of a 4mm allen wrench. 

100_4332.JPG.d20b1c3a901766758bb5953bdeb70a38.JPG

 

Thanks, this is pretty useful information, but as far as the starting thing goes, is that when using the kicker, or the button, or either. 

Because I usually give it a small twist of gas on any bike when I kick it.

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17 minutes ago, surfer-dude said:

Thanks, this is pretty useful information, but as far as the starting thing goes, is that when using the kicker, or the button, or either. 

Because I usually give it a small twist of gas on any bike when I kick it.

Either kick or button when motor is warmed up to operating temperature. If you need to use any throttle then it's valve adjustment time. As a disclaimer, this is what has worked for me on all my 4T's over the years. Some guys insist on checking them at certain intervals. It's up to you. I did my first check at about 50 hrs for the heck of it. 1st adjustment at about 150hrs. I have not needed one since. I'm almost at 300 hrs. 

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