How often does a "panic rev" actually work?

I understand the theory of it. Most videos I've seen where someone is starting to nose over in the air and they hit the panic rev...it doesn't really seem to get the front end up at all and over the bars they go. Even if they know almost immediatley and are on it before the apex of being airborne doesn't seem to do much.

 

On the other hand...I have seen the rear brake being used to drop the front end and that seems to be pretty effective.

Anyone have a panic rev save them?

5 minutes ago, Force10 said:

I understand the theory of it. Most videos I've seen where someone is starting to nose over in the air and they hit the panic rev...it doesn't really seem to get the front end up at all and over the bars they go. Even if they know almost immediatley and are on it before the apex of being airborne doesn't seem to do much.

 

On the other hand...I have seen the rear brake being used to drop the front end and that seems to be pretty effective.

Anyone have a panic rev save them?

When using the rear brake in the air make sure you use the clutch.  Killing the bike in mid air makes for a very interesting landing. :facepalm:

It doesn't bring front up it brings rear down.  It mostly works if coming up short.  Take the hard hit away as rear wheel drives you forward.  Becomes instinct along with rear brake.  Should always have a finger on the clutch a finger on front brake.  Will save you :thumbsup:

If your already higher in the RPMs leaving a jump your not going to get a lot of help from a panic rev. If you lower in the RPMs you get more torque from the panic rev and hence it will lift the front wheel more. Somewhere in here - https://youtu.be/7610sYWn78U?list=PLxR86UD-Ub2qidml9_sQCDW95LW7pvhAe - one of the pros talk about grabbing gears while doing so. If you got the skills to do that while having to panic rev, god bless you... A good reason not to be rev'ed out going off jumps unless you really know what you are doing. The counter effect happens a well. If you are high RPMs going off a jump but let off the throttle in mid air it will adjust your attitude down a bit.

I find that on a 450 it has more effect than on my 250. But I think that has a lot to do with what I mention above. On the 250 I ride higher in the RPMs than when I ride the 450.

"Panic" is more of an expression to a degree. While at one of your local tracks watch and listen to the better riders. You will hear them using short bursts of throttle quite often to adjust the attitude of the bike. Not that I'm a better rider, but I find myself doing this as well. As @Motox367 mentions it pretty effective when coming up short. Sometime you want to come up short a bit. Like a jump going into a corner; often times I plan on casing it so I don't go into the corner with quite so much speed. 

Is it going to help when going full endo - well anything is worth a shot in that case. You may be able to minimize the endo to the point of being able to save it. I have a least a couple of times it may have very well saved my bacon.

Edited by GoneDirtBikeN

All depends on the RPMs if you are at the top of the gear on the face its not going to make much difference to bang it off the limiter

Mostly helps arrest a forward pitch.  Its not likely to go back the other direction though.  Jabbing the rear brake is more sudden and more effective.  I guess you would have to pull the clutch in, upshift, rev it out and dump the clutch for a similarly pronounced effect.

Upon landing it does help push the bike forward to help ride out the landing.  The chain torque reaction has the effect of stiffening the rear suspension as well.

I use the panic rev to help adjust the bike in the air all the time, not necessarily a "save" move because if you need to save it that much you're pretty much screwed.  But I use it to make adjustments in some cases.  Most of the time, the key is having the correct neutral body position.  If you get that right, you can push the front down or lift the front to make the necessary adjustments.   When I hit a jump and find myself out of shape, I want to smack myself in the head for getting lazy with my body positioning on the bike.

I have occasionally up shifted to get more speed into the rear wheel when panic revving. I'm confident it has saved me on a few occasions

Sent from my SM-G935F using ThumperTalk mobile app

Geez...the moderator moved my post here from the General forum without leaving a link letting me know...I wasn't getting notifications on this thread either.

 

Gonedirtbikin, that's a great explanation...definitely learned something.

The MX track I ride is pretty mild and I'm a noob so I'm not in the air long enough for too much technique. It was mostly about the videos where I see the panic rev used and not really helping. When I go off a jump, as soon as my rear tire leaves the lip I let off the throttle and then roll it back on just before it contacts the ground again.

I only panic revved once on a mild triple that I always double...I had too much speed and my front tire was headed for the face of the third mound. I didn't crash but the faster wheel spin made for an awkward landing as I hit the mound and almost bounced off the bike...lol.

This not me in this vid...but it shows the mild triple that I'm talking about. His approach to the jump is at the 1:00 mark:

 

Anytime you make changes to the spinning wheels its all about Conservation of Momentum.  When you do a brake tap you take a wheel that is likely spinning fast and instantly stop it.  The laws of physics means that momentum is transferred to the rest of the bike and this has a much bigger effect on the bike attitude.  Revving the wheel in the same gear, especially if already higher in the revs(as mentioned) doesn't really add as much to the overall equation so it won't be drastic.  The bike itself does play a big part as to if this will work as well as the weight of the rear wheel.  For example if you have an 18" rim and a heavier tire then revving it up will likely help you level out a bit better.  

 

Revving/spinning up the rear wheel will do much more to get/keep the bike inline and upright than to bring the front up/drop the back down.  But if you are going to nose into the face of a jump, rev it til it blows!  

Even if you are high in the rpm's on the jump face the panic rev will keep the the front end up more then if you chop the throttle and drop the front end

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