street tires on dual sport?

Is there any issues with swapping to street tires on my dual sport?

Do I need to get other parts or can I just have the tires swapped? 

 

bike is mostly used on the street for commuting and grocery getting.

It's a simple swap as long as the sizes are the same.

6 minutes ago, Gflo said:

It's a simple swap as long as the sizes are the same.

are the disc brakes and rear sprocket bolted to the rims? or are they welded?

 

I also wanted to keep the offroad tires incase I plan to drive it offroad

...was thinking I could buy a set of new wheels, put street tires on it and easily swap between the offroad wheels and street wheels

 

Edited by horrorfan

The sprocket and discs are bolted to the wheel hubs.  The rim is the part that the tires are mounted to.  The rims are attached to the hubs by the spokes.

Edited by Gflo
3 hours ago, Gflo said:

The sprocket and discs are bolted to the wheel hubs.  The rim is the part that the tires are mounted to.  The rims are attached to the hubs by the spokes.

so its easy to swap over the disc and sprocket to another rim? just making sure I know every detail before I take out the toolbox.

3 hours ago, horrorfan said:

so its easy to swap over the disc and sprocket to another rim? just making sure I know every detail before I take out the toolbox.

Yes, as long as the hubs are the same, you can swap the discs and sprocket.  Although, if you get another wheel set, it would be best to get another set of discs and sprocket.  You may even want to get a smaller rear sprocket for street use.  Or get a larger sprocket for dirt use and use the stock one for the street.

Wait a minute! There are several parts being discussed here.

Tires = rubber things mounted to wheel

Wheel = 3 main parts rim, hub and spokes.

So given this general base if knowledge what are you trying to do? Put street tires on your existing rims or replace the whole wheel and tire combo with the wheel and tire combo from a street bike?

On 8/10/2017 at 1:33 PM, hadfield4wd said:

Wait a minute! There are several parts being discussed here.

Tires = rubber things mounted to wheel

Wheel = 3 main parts rim, hub and spokes.

So given this general base if knowledge what are you trying to do? Put street tires on your existing rims or replace the whole wheel and tire combo with the wheel and tire combo from a street bike?

just trying to make it easier to swap between offroad and street tires. 

 

I mostly ride on the street so it would prob be smarter to just swap new tires... but I know I want to take it offloading and eventually going to have to switch back.

I think just having two sets of rims would be easier that switching between tires (I don't have a tire press or any tire tools)




just trying to make it easier to swap between offroad and street tires. 



 



I mostly ride on the street so it would prob be smarter to just swap new tires... but I know I want to take it offloading and eventually going to have to switch back.



I think just having two sets of rims would be easier that switching between tires (I don't have a tire press or any tire tools)


You need $30 for tools to change tires.

But if you're going to switch that much get extra rims. Mounted up with different tires.

Or just use up the dirt tires. Thats what my son did. Just left on the dirt tires and we replaced when worn.
On August 13, 2017 at 7:22 AM, hadfield4wd said:

 


You need $30 for tools to change tires.

But if you're going to switch that much get extra rims. Mounted up with different tires.

Or just use up the dirt tires. Thats what my son did. Just left on the dirt tires and we replaced when worn.

 

Using up the tires sounds good... I have extra money so I don't mind just swapping out the tires for now and that way I can have the off road ones just in case I decide to bring it somewhere.

 

 

Get these tires: MEFO explorer. They ride like street tires even in the rain, and they do well off road. I have a set on my 2012 KLX250S and with 1000 miles they look new. I ride about 50/50 dirt/street. They are also a lot quieter than dirt tires but are rounded like street tires for cornering on the street.

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On 9/3/2017 at 8:52 AM, kdxyardsale said:

Get these tires: MEFO explorer. They ride like street tires even in the rain, and they do well off road. I have a set on my 2012 KLX250S and with 1000 miles they look new. I ride about 50/50 dirt/street. They are also a lot quieter than dirt tires but are rounded like street tires for cornering on the street.

 

those look good, how much did they run you?

I ride mostly street, occasionally find abandon offloading places during the weekend.

 

To me it seems like should buy 20/80 dirt/street

...but I wonder would that make the tires less offload capable than a 50/50?

Edited by horrorfan

I think I paid about $130 for the rear and $80 for the front delivered from a dealership in Utah. I got the same exact size if you get larger it can sap the power. I would use these as a all street tire, because they wear well and you could always go offroad if you wanted to.

On 9/8/2017 at 5:14 PM, kdxyardsale said:

I think I paid about $130 for the rear and $80 for the front delivered from a dealership in Utah. I got the same exact size if you get larger it can sap the power. I would use these as a all street tire, because they wear well and you could always go offroad if you wanted to.

 

sap the power?

sounds good, ill start looking at some local shops or maybe online next week.

 

 

"Sap the power" what I mean is everything the bike has to spin is a "flywheel". If you put 20% more tire on the back the motor has to work harder to spin it. Think of it like if you swing a bucket empty around and then you fill it half full of water. It takes more energy to get it going, also to stop it. With a 250cc we are already concerned with loss of power so that is why I stayed with the same size. I used to race two strokes in enduros, and a lot of guys weighted the engine flywheel to soften the massive hit of the powerband in a slick, rocky, muddy race on a two stroke. 

2 hours ago, kdxyardsale said:

"Sap the power" what I mean is everything the bike has to spin is a "flywheel". If you put 20% more tire on the back the motor has to work harder to spin it. Think of it like if you swing a bucket empty around and then you fill it half full of water. It takes more energy to get it going, also to stop it. With a 250cc we are already concerned with loss of power so that is why I stayed with the same size. I used to race two strokes in enduros, and a lot of guys weighted the engine flywheel to soften the massive hit of the powerband in a slick, rocky, muddy race on a two stroke. 

good info ill keep that in mind when im shoppin

...tire swap is postponed for now bc of that little fender bender. but its good to know what kind of functionality i can expect from the tire im buying, rather than blindly buying /swapping to street tirezzzz.

 

prob not a big deal i know these bikes are meant to "get dirty" and the fall wasnt really that bad. ill shud having running good soon.

Edited by horrorfan

I have always been a fan of getting as much rubber on the ground as I could. To accommodate the power issue I would add a tooth or two to the rear sprocket or in some cases drop one on the counter shaft sprocket depending on the type of riding I was setting the bike for.

On 9/19/2017 at 8:31 AM, KAWBOYBILL said:

I have always been a fan of getting as much rubber on the ground as I could. To accommodate the power issue I would add a tooth or two to the rear sprocket or in some cases drop one on the counter shaft sprocket depending on the type of riding I was setting the bike for.

Maybe later. honestly I like keepin my machines stock and maintained. 

 

I am going to pick up and start building an old car motor soon and that should be enough of a "optimizing performance project" ..but as for the bike I like how its like a little scooter I can zip around town.

 

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