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Enduro, the name

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What earns the true name "enduro"? When I think of Enduro, I think of endurance. Some videos I see require endurance because they look physically demanding. Others, look like a harescramble slowed down by the trail being tighter. Maybe it's the lack of terrain of someone wishing to create an Enduro race. Or maybe extreme enduro, that which requires  more endurance than a harescramble came later confusing the use of enduro. I don't know, I'm asking, and i am aware that hare scrambles require endurance. Maybe someone who races both can shed some light on how much endurance level is needed for both harescramble and enduro, or if there is a difference. Of course, pushing a bike up a hill makes a big difference, so do we assume this in enduro? 

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Enduros come in two basic flavors; the ISDE format and the time keeper.


The ISDE format is like the Scottish Six Day in that the riders are scored in observed sections and then must ride some distance to the next section. In ISDE they are timed in the sections. And there are time limits for each transit so no sightseeing.

The Time Keeper Enduro provides each contestants a route chart containing average speeds to maintain for each part, then their arrival time is recorded at several unknown check points. One point for each minute late and two points for each minute early, except for a secret tie breaker checkpoint where they are timed to the nearest second. The regular checkpoints must be at one minute intervals based on the average speeds.  Course distances are usually 70-100+ miles, and based on course layout that can become the endurance factor.  The organizers try to layout a course suitable for beginner to AA riders and often offer different courses for different rider classes.  A section of trail like a hill climb or stream crossing that is easily managed by a few riders not on a schedule becomes a choke point  when many riders arrive trying to maintain an average speed. Any delay waiting for another rider to restart his bike, or stalled and blocking a hill climb, means points lost unless you can ride fast enough to make up the lost time  before the next checkpoint. Riders start in groups of 4 at one minute intervals so a one minute delay at a choke point could involve 8 riders with more on the way.  

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 I think the term Enduro, which I believe was a originally an abbreviation for Endurance Trial, has probably lost it's meaning due to all the different uses/corruptions of it. In the old days the endurance factor applied to the motorcycle as much as the rider. Now we have motorcycles that can easily withstand hard off road use.

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I race both Enduros and Harescrambles . I personally enjoy the timekeeping enduros.  Harescrambles you generally race on a course you repeat several times as fast as you can go. The courses are generally faster and more open with few or no choke points. The endurance factor is riding full out for 2.5 -3 hours. Enduros typically run a non repeating course taking 5-7 hours to complete.  The terrain is slower , tighter and more technically challenging. There are times you have to ride full out but you also get some times to slow down and catch your breath. The endurance factor is how long your on the bike riding. Ride 80 miles in 6 hours on trails that that make you work can take a toll on you. 

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