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need advice on which rebuild kit to get

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Hey guys, I swamped out my 2002 cr250 in a huge mud puddle last month. Sucked mud into the crank through whole motor, destroyed bearings. I'm finally getting to re-building it and looking into full top and bottom end kits. 

I read the Wiseco kit is decent but the cranks aren't reliable. Is this true?

The Hot Rods kit looks nice too but is around $100.00 more. 

Also Wrench Rabbit which I've never heard of.

I could also just get a Wiseco top end kit and a Hot Rods bottom end.

I ride trails only, but we ride very far. I need a reliable engine. We were on a riding trip in West Virginia last month when I swamped my bike out, hours away from the lodge we were staying, good old CR still got me back under her own power after I pumped mud through the motor.  Love that bike.

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OEM would be the first choice...you can still get cranks, bearings etc. That would be the most expensive route buying all the parts separately but you'd get proven Honda reliable parts. I used a Hot Rods complete lower end kit with a Wiseco piston. That will always be my #2 choice.....Wrench Rabbits are priced slightly higher, Never used their kit....last would be the Wiseco crank. I wouldn't use one of their cranks in my bike if it were free.

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Go oem crank and vertex piston. Ran them in my 01 and 02 and will Probably either go vertex or oem in my ktm450 as well. Honestly after putting lots of hours the vertex is prolly one of best 2 stroke piston on the market and as for crank oem is always best. Wiseco has bad cranks and hot rods is ok but have heard and seen some bad things from the con rod. Pick your poison they all wear out eventually.

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Hey guys, I swamped out my 2002 cr250 in a huge mud puddle last month. Sucked mud into the crank through whole motor, destroyed bearings. I'm finally getting to re-building it and looking into full top and bottom end kits. 
I read the Wiseco kit is decent but the cranks aren't reliable. Is this true?
The Hot Rods kit looks nice too but is around $100.00 more. 
Also Wrench Rabbit which I've never heard of.
I could also just get a Wiseco top end kit and a Hot Rods bottom end.
I ride trails only, but we ride very far. I need a reliable engine. We were on a riding trip in West Virginia last month when I swamped my bike out, hours away from the lodge we were staying, good old CR still got me back under her own power after I pumped mud through the motor.  Love that bike.

20170207_112148.jpg20170207_112142.jpg20170207_112023.jpg20170207_112127.jpg20170207_112118.jpg20170207_112007.jpg
This is pics of a Wiseco 265cc 68.5mm complete engine rebuild kit after only 23 hours. You can tell by the piston wear that it was at very low hour's when the crank failed by the "tin-can" (as Wiseco called it) completely separating a 3" piece of itself above the left sides rod bearing. That should never be able to happen period on any crank. There are many other things that will end a cranks life before this could ever wear out enough to allow this to occur. I have went back to using Hot Rod or Wrench Rabbits cranks if not going back with a oem. It is now a 285cc/71mm bore with a Hot Rod crank & running very strong. I wouldn't ever use Wiseco's cranks again but there pistons are great.FB_IMG_1496015125686.jpg1496340722854.jpg

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20170207_112148.jpg.bb699f57a257abb0cadd0d25ccccb129.jpg20170207_112142.jpg.cad1702e6bcf6c11a732dbfc36e68945.jpg20170207_112023.jpg.d64064cf29f8b08322aff9dfbca43d84.jpg20170207_112127.jpg.3a76ac338ab0166f0d3b911414786301.jpg20170207_112118.jpg.3c366cd46620516ab1fd833b2face75d.jpg20170207_112007.jpg.f6df81e320bad4145298613c8862c051.jpg
This is pics of a Wiseco 265cc 68.5mm complete engine rebuild kit after only 23 hours. You can tell by the piston wear that it was at very low hour's when the crank failed by the "tin-can" (as Wiseco called it) completely separating a 3" piece of itself above the left sides rod bearing. That should never be able to happen period on any crank. There are many other things that will end a cranks life before this could ever wear out enough to allow this to occur. I have went back to using Hot Rod or Wrench Rabbits cranks if not going back with a oem. It is now a 285cc/71mm bore with a Hot Rod crank & running very strong. I wouldn't ever use Wiseco's cranks again but there pistons are great.FB_IMG_1496015125686.jpg.ace613db3d1ff163ccf7eeb4155fa5ff.jpg1496340722854.jpg.965007a74b3e725f3d3ffc01173dcacb.jpg

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Ouch, That wiseco failure looks horrible.

I run an OEM piston with a hot rods crank and have been fine so far, I race or ride my bike at a race pace every other weekend, I rebuilt it last October.
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Ouch, That wiseco failure looks horrible.

I run an OEM piston with a hot rods crank and have been fine so far, I race or ride my bike at a race pace every other weekend, I rebuilt it last October.

Yep, it was totally bull#!$@ that it did that. Its why I will not use Wiseco's cranks anymore. Even though I've heard that they've fixed the quality control issue. There pistons are great though.

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Did you contact wiseco afterwards?

I did. That's how I found out about the 2008-2011 quality control issue. Unfortunately, I had bought the crank as a spare back in 2009 but didn't install it tell the end of 2016. It failed in January of this year but was as seen in pic with a Hot Rod crank & back running strong by February so I wasn't expecting/wanting/needing much in the way of free replacement anyways.

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And what year is the motor that you tryed the big bores in ?

I originally bored it in 2006 to a 265cc. At that time I used the original OEM crank & a Wiseco 68.5mm piston & it ran/performed perfect for years. Then I bailed off in mid air over a 90' triple on the pro track at Durhamtown Plantation in Ga to avoid landing on a kid on a rm125r that had stopped on the damn track & when the bike came to rest it landed on & pinned the throttle while I was on the ground with a broken left collarbone, left ankle, right big toe, jammed fingers & 2 sprained wrists. Needless to say, I couldn't get up much less pick up my bike & the kid that caused it took off so I had to lay up against the tough blocks & listen to my bike stuck wide open until it locked up. After recovering from that, thats when I installed the Wiseco crank with again, a Wiseco piston. My point being, the engine modifications themselves where not the issue. It was simply the Wiseco crank was defective. They admitted to me it was. The parts I'm running in it now I know will last & the modifications are spot on & of high quality. So to answer you question, thats the motor that I did do big bores in. I didn't try to bore any motor.

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I originally bored it in 2006 to a 265cc. At that time I used the original OEM crank & a Wiseco 68.5mm piston & it ran/performed perfect for years. Then I bailed off in mid air over a 90' triple on the pro track at Durhamtown Plantation in Ga to avoid landing on a kid on a rm125r that had stopped on the damn track & when the bike came to rest it landed on & pinned the throttle while I was on the ground with a broken left collarbone, left ankle, right big toe, jammed fingers & 2 sprained wrists. Needless to say, I couldn't get up much less pick up my bike & the kid that caused it took off so I had to lay up against the tough blocks & listen to my bike stuck wide open until it locked up. After recovering from that, thats when I installed the Wiseco crank with again, a Wiseco piston. My point being, the engine modifications themselves where not the issue. It was simply the Wiseco crank was defective. They admitted to me it was. The parts I'm running in it now I know will last & the modifications are spot on & of high quality. So to answer you question, thats the motor that I did do big bores in. I didn't try to bore any motor.

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For who it may concern or who would simply be interested to know if they don't already. It's now a 71mm 285cc. The race shop that I hired to bore the cylinder to the 71mm piston shipped with it as well as re-coat/nickel seal, shave .020mm off my cylinder head to increase compression & set my squish pan for the leaded & oxygenated 114 octane fuel I run & my performance output preferences & shave my power valve down even further did tell me that the angle/degree of my piston stroke would have to be altered slightly to avoid breaching into or at the least having to little material between sections of the cylinder wall & coolant ports mostly on the front side of the cylinder. I myself then had to port out & polish all direct injection ports, coolant ports, exhaust port, carburetor inlet & outlet ports & just port out the intake manifold/rubber boot connecting the carb to the reed cage, the reed cage inner port to again flush fit with the intake boots inner diameter, re-jet & retune the carb, slightly in large the 2 air box holes in the side #plates & the 1 at the bottom in front of the mud flap on the air box itself. Then drill 2-2.8mm & 1-3.0mm oiler holes in the piston center of the piston skirt which is obviously center of the exhaust port just below the lower compression ring & just above the bottom of the exhaust port when the piston is at the bottom of its stroke. This slightly changing the exhaust port timing by letting a very small amount of fresh intake air to pass through into the expansion chamber. The oil that passes through coats the exhaust port & power valve after each ignition/combustion cycle. The oil then gets forced by the slightly delayed returning pressurised exhaust gasses (port timing) to the edges of the exhaust port which then gets forced between the piston & cylinder wall under the lower ring therefore oiling both sides of the front skirt where the stock oiler holes can no longer oil this area & the power valve properly for they are now slightly further away from this area as well as the extra pressures from the big bore prevent enough oil from reaching this area as they are now mostly oiling the added surface area of the oversized piston. This prevents those wear marks alot of people get on the front of their piston on both sides just past the edge of the exhaust port between the direct injections final port holes where the stock oiler holes are. In short, they adjust your exhaust port timing & help oil the power valve & the cylinder surrounding it. If you were to run it without them, it would cause your piston, cylinder & power valve to undergo major excessive damage because, ( I'll it say again) the stock oilers are now mostly used on the larger surface area of the piston causing those 2 little 3/8" area's & the power valve itself to run dry or at least very lean on oil. It would also loose power & run like shit from acsessive carbon build up & lack of oxygen caused by the exhaust port timing being off therefore your exhaust port/power valve will let exhaust gasses back into the combustion chamber because it won't close in time.

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