Back tire keeps slipping on jumps

Whenever I ride on a track that it sand when ever my front tire leaves the ground on s jump my back tire slips around not a lot but it's distracting and annoying how can I do it to where I can jump without my back tire slipping

Try softening the rebound to allow tire to stay in contact with the take off.

Sent from my SM-N920V using ThumperTalk mobile app

Try softening the rebound to allow tire to stay in contact with the take off.

Sent from my SM-N920V using ThumperTalk mobile app




Honestly idk how to do that, I was told to let if the gas at the top but then I nose dive even if I lean back

What year and model is your bike?

Sent from my SM-N920V using ThumperTalk mobile app

What year and model is your bike?

Sent from my SM-N920V using ThumperTalk mobile app



2009 yz 85
1 hour ago, Hunter743 said:

 

Whenever I ride on a track that it sand when ever my front tire leaves the ground on s jump my back tire slips around not a lot but it's distracting and annoying how can I do it to where I can jump without my back tire slipping

 

If I'm understanding you description correctly, it sounds like your rear tire is kicking out left or right when you leave the face of a jump, correct?

46 minutes ago, Hunter743 said:

 

Whenever I ride on a track that it sand when ever my front tire leaves the ground on s jump my back tire slips around not a lot but it's distracting and annoying how can I do it to where I can jump without my back tire slipping

 

Is it only in the case of this jump/sand? You say "not a lot" and in my limited experience (a couple sand tracks I love to ride, one is pretty deep sand) it's pretty normal in sand for the bike to dance around a bit even what your describing leaving a jump. Squeeze with your legs and that will help minimize it. Make sure you are using momentum in the sand and not just gassing it at the top to clear something. The good news is sand gives a bit so you just got to get use to it.

On sand vs dirt you will most likely need to adjust your suspension. On my one bike I need to add a couple mm of sag while on another that had air forks I use a couple more lbs pressure in the forks which not only stiffened them it also kept them higher in the stroke.

Does your back tire want to dance around (swapping) in other sections of a dirt track (like going through whoops, breaking bumps, acceleration bumps, etc.)?

Sand tends to get rutted out a bit more, especially if the jump face itself is sand, is this the case?

30 minutes ago, Hunter743 said:

 


... I was told to let if the gas at the top but then I nose dive even if I lean back...

 

Never let off the gas leaving a jump unless you want the front end to dive. But you know that now. I actually will do this going over a single where I want the front back on the ground immediately, like for needing to start a turn right away. But then you want to be right back on the gas as soon as the rear wheel crests the top.

40 minutes ago, Hunter743 said:

 


Thanks but I don't really want to do suspension work I think it's my technique, any tips so I don't make a bad habit

 

You say you don't want to do "suspension work". Adjusting your clickers and sag is not suspension work but rather adjusting for various track conditions. If you are riding both dirt and sand you will very much want to make suspension adjustments.

If I'm understanding you description correctly, it sounds like your rear tire is kicking out left or right when you leave the face of a jump, correct?


That is exactly right

The track is really loose sand so that doesn't help

You say you don't want to do "suspension work". Adjusting your clickers and sag is not suspension work but rather adjusting for various track conditions. If you are riding both dirt and sand you will very much want to make suspension adjustments.

I get cross rutted really bad in one part that is really loose sand and my front tire wants to go one why and my back another but throughout the day it got packed down so it was better

And about the suspension think we have no experience and knowledge my dad was never a serious rider and I'm only 14 and started a few months ago

And yeah I don't let off the gas anymore lol
You say you don't want to do "suspension work". Adjusting your clickers and sag is not suspension work but rather adjusting for various track conditions. If you are riding both dirt and sand you will very much want to make suspension adjustments.


I've never risen I dirt track only sand and there is a set of sooo like bumps they are bigger and really rutted my back tire dances around there but as long is I stay in second gear or maybe even 3rd it doesn't happen it's hard to get the speed back up because it's like 10 feet from s 180 degree turn
56 minutes ago, Hunter743 said:

 


That is exactly right

As mentioned above, on sand tracks/jumps, the back can move around some, but also as mentioned, try to use momentum over a jump and not hard acceleration.  When you are accelerating hard off the face of a jump, the back tire is digging hard, and it can exaggerate any imperfections on the lip, which will give you the movement or kick out.  A steady throttle, not letting off, or not accelerating. 

This comes back to corner speed where you have the momentum to just coast over a jump.  If you don't corner well, then you'll find yourself needing to accelerate all the way up a jump to get over it.  Of course there will be times that you have too accelerate all the way up and off the face of a jump, and also let off on the face of a jump.  Body position will be very important, and a seat of the pants feel what the bike is doing instantly when you are leaving, and leave the jump.  I've learned when the bike does kick out, I lift me leg and let the bike go, then drag it back in with my boot and leg.

Eventually, you'll need to start learning to adjust your suspension.  It's not hard or complicated.  Your owners manual will cover the basics, or you can find someone at the track that will take you in and help you. 

Also, it's been said before:  Seat time, seat time, seat time.

 

Edited by WALKINGWOUNDED
1 minute ago, Hunter743 said:


I get cross rutted really bad in one part that is really loose sand and my front tire wants to go one why and my back another but throughout the day it got packed down so it was better

And about the suspension think we have no experience and knowledge my dad was never a serious rider and I'm only 14 and started a few months ago

And yeah I don't let off the gas anymore lol

That cool, it gives you and you dad both something to learn and work on.

Let me guess, front tire seems like it has a mind of it's own and wants to go everywhere. Usually sand gets wilder as the day goes on. To some degree you need to just learn that the bike is going to dance around a bit in sand. That being said, proper suspension adjustments are even more important in sand. The more you make your bike work for you, the less you have to fight it to get it to do what you want it to do.

I found this via google:

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/580297/Yamaha-Yz85.html?page=28 - fork rebound and compression damping settings

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/580297/Yamaha-Yz85.html?page=30#manual - setting sag.

Next time you ride sand you may want to try adding a little sag and it will help calm down the front wheel. One turn = 1.5mm so I'd say give one turn a try and decide if better or worse. If you read the directions in the url above for sag, you want to move in the direction of B to decrease pre-load (that means you are increasing SAG). Just one (two at most unless your suspension is really off) turn should make a difference you will notice on the track. If you don't like it, simply turn it back. This should also help with the rear end traction as well as the bike will squat a bit more in the rear. You may also want to stiffen your compression on your forks. I'd try sag first and then go from there.

You really should know where all your clickers are set and keep a log of any changes you make. Helps if you decide you want to go back to some "last known good" settings.

You also learned being in a higher gear helps keep the back end settled down - that works for down hills too. So it is a trade off of when you need to use a lower gear to accelerate quickly, you want to shift up once you got the acceleration you needed. That being said, you tend to need a bit lower gear for sand. 

Carrying corner speed is even more important in sand. That is because in sand your speed will die "in the bat of a Nat's eyelash". A lot of times you really don't even need to brake going into a corner on a sand track. Just letting off the throttle will do that. Typically you want to keep at least some throttle on to keep from getting too slow. You certainly don't want but the lightest touch on the front brake. I use just about zero front brake on a sand track. I like to use the back brake to "back the tire" into the turn going into any sharp turns and then get on the throttle - in other words, in sand I like to steer with the rear tire more than the front.

In sand you can get on the throttle much earlier exiting the turn - work on that! You kind of need to (see above about steering with the rear and that your speed dies quickly in sand).

It may be a good idea to stick to the berms on turns so that you carry better speed. In sand, you do not want to go high into the berm. People who want to look cool do that. They rail high into the berm, loose all there speed, and then blast the throttle and are impressed at the roost they threw - that is the slowest way. On dirt you want to go high into the berm because that holds your tires. In sand, that is the softest spot. Look at the bottom of the berm and chances are you are going to see someone's line there. That line will hold your tire the best, you will be able to hold more throttle which means you will have better exit speed.

As @WALKINGWOUNDED said, make friends with people at the track. Have your dad make friends at the track. It takes time but people will start to help you out.

This^^^

Here's an example of not going high in the berm but the fast line at the bottom.

That being said, if you want to go high to "play in the sand" by all means do so because it is really just irresistible at times. :cheers: Just remember to stay on the throttle.

 

Capture.JPG

11 hours ago, Hunter743 said:

 

 


Thanks but I don't really want to do suspension work I think it's my technique, any tips so I don't make a bad habit

 

Its not suspension work its turning an adjuster with a screw driver

11 hours ago, Hunter743 said:

 

 


Honestly idk how to do that, I was told to let if the gas at the top but then I nose dive even if I lean back

 

obviously you know better now but I would seriously be weary of any advice that person gives you.

obviously you know better now but I would seriously be weary of any advice that person gives you.


He said since it's a 2 stroke that my momentum will carry me but obviously not
12 hours ago, Hunter743 said:

 


Honestly idk how to do that, I was told to let if the gas at the top but then I nose dive even if I lean back

 

So how do you know if your tire is slipping? 

So how do you know if your tire is slipping? 

It moves sideways when in the air then I have to correct it but one time it was really far over and I almost landed sideways

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now