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Need a lowering link?

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I thought I'd inform fellow TT'ers about this.  There are a couple of Yamalink lowering links on ebay for $4.99 and $5.00.  Obviously a mistake on the sellers part but if you act quickly, maybe they will HAVE TO sell it for that price.  Normally, they're over$100.  And that's the "buy it now" price, not the starting bid...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Yamaha-YZ250F-YZ426F-YZ450F-Lowering-Link-Kit-YamaLink-/352153230226?hash=item51fdf7db92:g:~UwAAOSw0TxZaL6H&vxp=mtr

Edited by motoxvet
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They probably wouldn't sell it to you if it was a mistake. I bought a 150 dollar rc car battery charger for 99 cents on ebay but the guy wouldn't sell it to me because he made a mistake.

Sent from my SM-G900V using ThumperTalk mobile app

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I had a $59 bearing set I got from this ebayer.  I decided to order another set a week later and it was $159.  I messaged him and asked why it went up so high.  He said they were out of them and didn't want to remove the listing.

So when you see something priced way high, it may just be a placeholder.

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Bikes were designed for the chassis/suspension to work in a certain manner.  Any lowering (or raising) of the suspension will affect handling adversely.  Depending on the bike and the amount will determine how much.

Edited by cjjeepercreeper

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25 minutes ago, cjjeepercreeper said:

Bikes were designed for the chassis/suspension to work in a certain manner.  Any lowering (or raising) of the suspension will affect handling adversely.  Depending on the bike and the amount will determine how much.

It has an effect but not always an adverse one.  Lowering the rear increases the head angle and trail.  Trades some cornering for stability.  For some bikes that is an improvement.

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21 minutes ago, cjjeepercreeper said:

Bikes were designed for the chassis/suspension to work in a certain manner.  Any lowering (or raising) of the suspension will affect handling adversely.  Depending on the bike and the amount will determine how much.

While that is true, many of us (like me) simply cannot ride a modern MX/Woods bike. I have a 27" inseam and two bad knees. I do not race. Perfect handling is less important than not falling simply because I cannot reach the ground.

Then there are those guys that are relative n00bs and the security of flat footing makes a difference.

Then there are the guys the ride billy goat technical trails and handling is all HP and Body English, they too, get in places where one side might be close to a foot peg and the other, two feet down.

What is important that the spings chosen work for your weight, how you ride.

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Just now, turbo dan said:

It has an effect but not always an adverse one.  Lowering the rear increases the head angle and trail.  Trades some cornering for stability.  For some bikes that is an improvement.

My statement was a general one.  The engineers that designed the bike hopefully and presumably knew what they were doing.  I could have stated more accurately that it will affect handling, but in a majority of cases the handling may be affected adversely.

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Just now, William1 said:

What is important that the spings chosen work for your weight, how you ride.

Aha, now you got to another observation of mine.  Those charts and calculators on the suspension websites...don't always believe them.  From my experience they may steer you to a spring that is too stiff, especially if you ride trails and don't ride competitively.  I used the calculator on one of the big suspension manufacturer websites and ended up with front springs that were too heavy for my taste.  I went back to the stockers which allegedly are for someone 25 lbs. lighter and they work well for me.

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1 hour ago, cjjeepercreeper said:

Aha, now you got to another observation of mine.  Those charts and calculators on the suspension websites...don't always believe them.  From my experience they may steer you to a spring that is too stiff, especially if you ride trails and don't ride competitively.  I used the calculator on one of the big suspension manufacturer websites and ended up with front springs that were too heavy for my taste.  I went back to the stockers which allegedly are for someone 25 lbs. lighter and they work well for me.

Yup. Spring calculators are just to give you an idea of a spring approximation to start with. Suspension is entirely subjective and what works for one guy may not work for another.

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2 hours ago, cjjeepercreeper said:

Aha, now you got to another observation of mine.  Those charts and calculators on the suspension websites...don't always believe them.  From my experience they may steer you to a spring that is too stiff, especially if you ride trails and don't ride competitively.  I used the calculator on one of the big suspension manufacturer websites and ended up with front springs that were too heavy for my taste.  I went back to the stockers which allegedly are for someone 25 lbs. lighter and they work well for me.

I went thru the same thing and the only reason I got one rate stiffer than stock was so I could finally set the correct rear sag and hopefully that would cure the poor performance of my front end.  it only slight;y improved it.  I still have the OE fork springs in my YZ and I'm sure I'm at least 30 lb. heaver than they were intended for and I've NEVER hit bottom on the forks, even after a re-valve.  Like william hinted at, most MX bikes make poor woods bikes without lots of work.  If I ever see a Yamalink for my YZ at a reasonable price I'll try one, although it may make the front push worse.

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Spring rate is only part of it.  Preload is important as well, its just not as easy to adjust as it in on the shock.  You can run a soft spring with more preload to get to the same sag as a stiff spring with little preload.  The stiffer spring will get stiffer sooner and ultimately require more force to compress fully while the soft spring will act in a more linear fashion as it gets deeper into the stroke.

Springs don't do a whole lot to prevent bottoming unless your valving is ultra soft.  Big jumps require sufficient damping to dissipate the energy over the whole stroke.  Springs and oil height only really kick in at the end of the travel.  It would surely be a mistake to attempt to address an issue with damping by installing stiffer springs.

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I was thinking there was a golden ratio between static sag and rider sag that weeded out spring weight vs preload options.

Edited by wielywilly-g

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I know the makers of the Yamalink recommend a spring rate change because of the difference in the way their linkage works with a different mechanical advantage.  I originally got a stiffer shock spring because I couldn't set sag no matter how far I turned the adjuster.  A slightly stiffer spring - I think from a YZ400F - and it was easy to get the correct numbers.  I'd still like to try the link and if it didn't help, I can sell it.

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I can say that the lowering link on my 2017 CRF450R definitely improved the suspension for me. A bit stiffer springs in the fork and shock. I had to cave in and face the fact that a suspension re-valve was the only way forward. That took my suspension from doing unwanted things to I'm pretty darn happy with it. Like @William1 I'm a bit short legged. I used a lit of the lowering to raise the forks in the triple clamps which lower the front end a bit as well . Every bit helps sometimes. Then it also lets me reduce sag to 105 while previously it was 107.

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1 hour ago, GoneDirtBikeN said:

I can say that the lowering link on my 2017 CRF450R definitely improved the suspension for me. A bit stiffer springs in the fork and shock. I had to cave in and face the fact that a suspension re-valve was the only way forward. That took my suspension from doing unwanted things to I'm pretty darn happy with it. Like @William1 I'm a bit short legged. I used a lit of the lowering to raise the forks in the triple clamps which lower the front end a bit as well . Every bit helps sometimes. Then it also lets me reduce sag to 105 while previously it was 107.

Like you two, I'm a little vertically challenged too.  For now a slightly shaved seat gets me by although in tough ST, when I sometimes need to put THAT foot down, the ground isn't there and I take a tumble.

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