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More old, slow guy Yz125 tuning

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I finally got the right shock and fork springs (per racetech calculator) and noticed it takes special tools and I should replace the seals and bushings. In addition to the good directions on TT, there are several rebuild videos that make it look pretty straight forward. I was really hoping to pull the handlebars, remove the fork caps and swap springs (and oil also), but this isn't a 1985 fz600. 

My goal for the springs (and probably revalving later) is to make it more confidence inspiring. Right now it's light enough for me to push around, but it never feels natural going into a turn and seems like I do something different every time (pushing the inside bar, actually turning into the turn at first, keeping it tight, going wide, etc). At least on exit, opening the throttle gives the expected wheel spin to finish off the turn. I still have troubles remembering it has a back brake and I wonder if guys use it much to initiate the turn. 

The last time I rode, I about ran right into a pond and killed it. Thankfully it starts pretty easy, but it did get me thinking about the rekluse I had on the crf450. I did some checking and I couldn't find and of the core models that fit the 125, but there are a couple of new rekluse clutches that fit. With the 4T it's a no brainer unless you enjoy lengthy kickstarts and I never killed it when it wasn't hot and in an awkward position. I've seen at least one post where a yz125 was pretty happy with a rekluse. I wonder which one he had (I think it was a really old post though). 

 

20170831_064557.jpg

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Sprung for your weight will make big difference.  And yes use front and back brakes together.  The back brake will keep the ass end down when braking bumps get bad into corners.  But you have to be going fast or Idk maybe they buck you around.  Get your weight up front more coming into corners one finger on clutch one on front brake.  Try useing your front more doing that but don't lose your momentum and get on the gas soon as you can power out useing that finger on clutch to control traction, wheelie exc... cant let off on a 125. Once you learn to ride that wide open and shift they are incredibly fast :thumbsup: and very fun.  Spent a number of years as a kid racing them before moving to bigger bikes.  But still love to make one sing every now and then . I would think you'd need a recluse on that just keep that finger on clutch to control everything basically.  Try 51 tooth rear sprocket maybe . Goodluck :thumbsup:

Edited by Motox367

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4 hours ago, harmetp said:

Thankfully it starts pretty easy, but it did get me thinking about the rekluse I had on the crf450. I did some checking and I couldn't find and of the core models that fit the 125, but there are a couple of new rekluse clutches that fit. With the 4T it's a no brainer unless you enjoy lengthy kickstarts and I never killed it when it wasn't hot and in an awkward position. I've seen at least one post where a yz125 was pretty happy with a rekluse. I wonder which one he had (I think it was a really old post though). 

I have a Rekluse EXP 3.0 for a YZ125 sitting on my bench that's only been used twice, and was pulled out of the bike before selling it.  It never made it into my current YZ125 because that bike is set up for track / mx racing.  The Rekluse really does feel like cheating in technical terrain.  PM me if interested, I'll give you a really good deal on it.

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2 hours ago, Motox367 said:

 cant let off on a 125. Once you learn to ride that wide open and shift they are incredibly fast :thumbsup: and very fun. 

That has never occurred to me. So you're saying use the clutch as your throttle and keep the throttle pretty much wide open or maybe not quite?

Thanks

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10 minutes ago, harmetp said:

That has never occurred to me. So you're saying use the clutch as your throttle and keep the throttle pretty much wide open or maybe not quite?

Thanks

That's right :thumbsup: the only way to ride a 125 :ride: a finger on the clutch will save you from potential crashes.  Keep it adjusted so you only have to pull in bout half inch or so. Also I've always replaced cable, perch and lever at same time and nothing beats a oem cable. Keep it so one finger easy pull. I use pointer finger need rest to hang on lol

Edited by Motox367
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I'm getting closer to having enough stuff to "fix" the YZ. Hopefully I don't find a handful of broken bits inside the forks. If it goes pretty fast, I hope to get out to the trails and see how it works.

Btw, what do you guys think about lowering the forks a little in the triple clamp. I'm pretty sure mine are all the way up. 

20170831_163509.jpg

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1 hour ago, Motox367 said:

That's right :thumbsup: the only way to ride a 125 :ride: a finger on the clutch will save you from potential crashes.  Keep it adjusted so you only have to pull in bout half inch or so. Also I've always replaced cable, perch and lever at same time and nothing beats a oem cable. Keep it so one finger easy pull. I use pointer finger need rest to hang on lol

:thumbsup:

Definitely my approach for the track...throttle is either shut off or at 3/4-full, and I dispense justice with the left index finger.

Woods riding usually takes more finesse though ;)

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1 hour ago, harmetp said:

Btw, what do you guys think about lowering the forks a little in the triple clamp. I'm pretty sure mine are all the way up. 

If it were me, I'd put it back at stock (5mm) and adjust as you see fit.  Raise the forks (increase the gap) to steer quicker, and lower them (closer to flush with the cap) to increase stability.  Rear end sag is key to set before you mess with the fork height though.

2006yz125-forkheight.png

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On 8/31/2017 at 7:37 PM, Tankslap said:

If it were me, I'd put it back at stock (5mm) and adjust as you see fit.  Raise the forks (increase the gap) to steer quicker, and lower them (closer to flush with the cap) to increase stability.  Rear end sag is key to set before you mess with the fork height though.

2006yz125-forkheight.png

This is good advice. A lot of science went into this frame, and the fork length is designed to keep the bike riding stable and true at or around the stock 5mm position. Any deviation from this will change the handling either to corner quicker or be more stable, but you can't increase one without decreasing the other. They can't really be adjusted just to lower the ride.

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