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Tires: What are some of the more street, but off-road capable tires

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I've been waiting to have people compile a set a of dual sport tires that perform decent on the street and decent off-road. They Must be able to go to 100mph and fit a 3-1/4" x 21" and 4-1/2" x 18". Budget is not a factor for the list, but will be for the eventual buying.

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On 9/6/2017 at 2:56 PM, jasonemorgan said:

TKC80

Had these on a Triumph Tiger 800XC and they did amazingly well off-road, including fairly deep sugar sand. And, they come stock on the Husky 701 Enduro that my buddy rides. He goes everywhere I go on Pirelli MT21 DOT knobbies that are more aggressive.

I'd also look at the Motoz Tractionatore ADV:
https://xladv.com/reviews/product/788-motoz-tractionator-adventure-15070-18/

 

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Since I did my 3 months, 16500 mile adventure a few years ago (R1200GS), I do at least one 4500+ mile ride on the backroads of the US per year... mostly dirt, some of it to a point (usually by accident) where I'd think twice on my 525EXC. While tires are a key factor for me, it is mostly their endurance I am concerned with, really.

Over the past few years, I have tried Anakees, Shinkos, Full Bores, Tourance and TKC80s... in the end, it doesn't really matter, unless you run into a multi-day mudfest.

Your riding abilities are much more of a factor here, than your tires, IMHO. Unless you have a full on street tire, the modern Dual Sport tires usually get you where you need/want to go.

Next year, I'll be switching bikes and go with a DR650, shod with Kendas K761. Simply because they were on the bike when I bought it and they are new. These kind of tires give you the ability to have some fun on the road and not to get into too much trouble off road. If you go more knobby, you can still have fun, but on the pavement, the longevity is dramatically cut short. On dirt, gravel etc. they last long and perform really well, though.

 

just my 2 cents

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Kenda Big Blocks for me. I'm on my 2nd set. I'm keeping track of this new set to see just how many miles I'll be squeezing out of them. My pair lasted somewhere between 2000-3000 miles. The front still had some wear left but I was planning a Grand Canyon tour so I did not want to chance it on older rubber. 

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On 10/11/2017 at 7:50 AM, signit98 said:

Since I did my 3 months, 16500 mile adventure a few years ago (R1200GS), I do at least one 4500+ mile ride on the backroads of the US per year... mostly dirt, some of it to a point (usually by accident) where I'd think twice on my 525EXC. While tires are a key factor for me, it is mostly their endurance I am concerned with, really.

Over the past few years, I have tried Anakees, Shinkos, Full Bores, Tourance and TKC80s... in the end, it doesn't really matter, unless you run into a multi-day mudfest.

Your riding abilities are much more of a factor here, than your tires, IMHO. Unless you have a full on street tire, the modern Dual Sport tires usually get you where you need/want to go.

Next year, I'll be switching bikes and go with a DR650, shod with Kendas K761. Simply because they were on the bike when I bought it and they are new. These kind of tires give you the ability to have some fun on the road and not to get into too much trouble off road. If you go more knobby, you can still have fun, but on the pavement, the longevity is dramatically cut short. On dirt, gravel etc. they last long and perform really well, though.

 

just my 2 cents

Isn't that the truth! For myself i just remember that these big block style tires cannot be pushed hard like a traditional knobby in the corners. I also am of the opinion that I'm going to be using a minimum of a big block tire for any bike that will be seeing even a small percentage of dirt.

I actually was stupid enough to see how far I could go on a set of 80/20 tires in the sand. The outcome was not good at all!! Rounded tires let go with no warning whatsoever in the sand! I can live with knobby's on pavement. Smooth tires on dirt are just crazy dumb. When I see  guys doing it I just scratch my head in bewilderment........

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On 9/5/2017 at 8:15 AM, HB3andC said:

 

I've been waiting to have people compile a set a of dual sport tires that perform decent on the street and decent off-road. They Must be able to go to 100mph and fit a 3-1/4" x 21" and 4-1/2" x 18". Budget is not a factor for the list, but will be for the eventual buying.

 

To make an assumption on what tire, don't ya think we should know the bike?

As weight plays an important role. 

Also those are not normal DS sized rims, right?

And decent off-road is subjective, how about what parts for the country you'll be riding offroad. Then I think you will get an answer you're looking for......:ride:

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Well, it will be a 'built' Yamaha xt-350, as far as off road, it's Idaho/Washington. So steep mountains, to rocky washouts, to river crossings.
The hope is for the bike (just under 300lbs, and me+ gear which is just under 200lbs) to have about 35 (or more) hp for my intended use of on a rally car track (for kicks and giggles really) and to hit around 90mph

As far as my qualification of "decent" I mean what you would personally use as the one connection between your life, and whatever road or trail you choose to ride. It is where "the rubber meets the road" after all.

I personally have the requirements of must be able to corner on wet roads at around 90mph, and knobby enough to rock crawl up creek beds under a load, while still being DOT legal.

I hopefully don't sound snarky, as that's not my intention, it's just my manner of speaking.

Currently it's running Kenda 270's, which have outshone my trail buds less knobby tires, and while the engine was mostly stock, it did pretty great to 75mph, but couldn't corner like my trail buds slicker tires.

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I run Mitas E-07 Dakars on and offroad on my Super Tenere.  They do well on both.  
+1 for the E07 Dakars. I have been amazed at how well they've performed. I have 4k miles on mine, and they have been great on road as well as off--I won't say they look brand new, but I have plenty of tread left on the rear still, and the front is barely worn.

Spent 4 days riding to, around, and home from Moab last June. These tires hooked up on everything but the sand, baby head, and steep hill mix I got myself into by not turning around at the end of Onion Creek. We went where no VStrom should ever go...

100 mph seems fine--it's pushing the limits of a VStrom, so it's difficult to know what about that speed is the bike and what is the tire. I installed mine with Counter Balance beads, rather than risking some tech opting the weights on wrong. No speed wobble at all.
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On 10/19/2017 at 5:38 PM, HB3andC said:

Well, it will be a 'built' Yamaha xt-350, as far as off road, it's Idaho/Washington. So steep mountains, to rocky washouts, to river crossings.
The hope is for the bike (just under 300lbs, and me+ gear which is just under 200lbs) to have about 35 (or more) hp for my intended use of on a rally car track (for kicks and giggles really) and to hit around 90mph

As far as my qualification of "decent" I mean what you would personally use as the one connection between your life, and whatever road or trail you choose to ride. It is where "the rubber meets the road" after all.

I personally have the requirements of must be able to corner on wet roads at around 90mph, and knobby enough to rock crawl up creek beds under a load, while still being DOT legal.

I hopefully don't sound snarky, as that's not my intention, it's just my manner of speaking.

Currently it's running Kenda 270's, which have outshone my trail buds less knobby tires, and while the engine was mostly stock, it did pretty great to 75mph, but couldn't corner like my trail buds slicker tires.

Wow, OK your requirements are, ummm, impressive :thumbsup:

From my last 5 DS machines and many in my riding club and riding all over the west from rocky mountain to sandy desert AND riding these bikes with many many many tire brands I'd say you're not going to have "all" your cake and eat it too......

1. 90 MPH on the wet highway is always dangerous especially going around corners as "real" quality DOT off-road tires are focussed elsewhere. There are great tires for this kind of duties but you WILL suffer offroad riding aggressively. But you already know that. Hauling ass on a DS in the rain with real aggressive DOT offroad is serious pucker factor. Also with proper offroad suspension your bike will not be liking having the tires loaded hard on the highway, it will play games on you.

2. My old Husky 610 was heavy enough to offer stability but in the 85-90 world on damp roads it created a considerable amount of pucker factor, total understatement. I also had an Aprilia 2008 RXV550, totally tuned for 70-RWHP and have blazed it across the desert floor many many times in excess of 70mph and 100mph on the pavement, BUT wet roads never and I repeat never in raining conditions.

3. IMHO, there is really no real reason to go that fast on wet curvy roads on a DS, sorry. Ok, maybe I'm spoiled by having 6 motorcycles in my garage, but I pick the right tool for the right job. And most people that look forward in enjoying long healthy life should also think that way.

4. YET, not trying to be a dick, but some 65-85 mph running on the road preferably dry or damp and excellent offroad manners one might look at MotoZ DT tires, great street manners and killer offroad for your type of conditions. This tire has a DOT design, very very solid in desert/rocky conditions and very sticky on the street.  Chris has also suggested some great tires also in his reply to this post.

5. But as always "balance" your tires, check your rims/spokes/wheel bearings carefully prior to installation, do your due diligence on all aspects of your machine. 

Lofty expectations are great, we all have them, just make sure they somewhat mirror some little piece of reality....

Enjoy! :ride: 

Mark

 

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Mefo Explorers, they do well on the street even in rain and hard braking dry. Very well off road, just short of a full mx tire. These pics are with over 1000 miles. They are German made so not too popular here yet, but I see more places carrying them now. Not even sure I would try another brand at this point.

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