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Will a mousse make the front end feel more stable?

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Going from a 4 stroke to a 2 stroke the thing that I miss the most is how planted it felt, is there any way to get my front end feeling more planted, bike is a 2013 ktm 300xcw?
 
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Look up some Golden Tyre Fatty reviews.  Might be what you are looking for.

I loved the light feeling in the front end when I came off my 525.

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Never had one but the word in the pits is that there vague feeling so I would say no.

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Have you tried dropping or raising the forks in the triples yet?

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My forks at the moment have one line showing above the triple clamp. At the moment I feel like I can't just point and shoot, I'm almost wondering about installing the tubliss up front and dropping my tire pressure a little to maybe help with deflection, or moving my bar position to the front mounting holes to put more weight over the front tire? I also have a steering damper but set real light I could always adjust a bit but I feel like that would just be masking the situation.

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My forks at the moment have one line showing above the triple clamp. At the moment I feel like I can't just point and shoot, I'm almost wondering about installing the tubliss up front and dropping my tire pressure a little to maybe help with deflection, or moving my bar position to the front mounting holes to put more weight over the front tire? I also have a steering damper but set real light I could always adjust a bit but I feel like that would just be masking the situation.

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Front deflection could be to fast rebound

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can't address mousse, but when I got my 17 300XCW, I did not like the way the front end felt floaty in turns. Changed to a different tire profile and it helped a lot. Went from a 90/90-21 to a 80/100-21

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On 9/6/2017 at 3:40 PM, DernHumpus said:

Look up some Golden Tyre Fatty reviews.  Might be what you are looking for.

Such a great front tire. Rolls right over anything and has great downhill braking!

I put one on and grabbed a spare right away I was so impressed! Then put a Mitas 754 green stripe on the rear and go anywhere!!!

Edit: I'll add that I run Tubliss front and rear also. Tubliss with the Fatty is a perfect combo. I run it at 10 psi and the same in the rear....maybe 7-8psi back there on a greasy day. The tire/Tubliss technology has been really improving in the last few years. The traction is amazing!

Edited by 2strokes_rule
Tubliss addition

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If you are coming from a 4 stroke I doubt there is anything you can do, other than get used to it.  I spend most of my time riding especially squirrelly two strokes (125s), and I'm always shocked when I take a spin on a four stroke on the same trails.  It used to be that the weights of 2 and 4 strokes were dramatically different and I thought that it was the cause, but now that the weights are more or less the same, I am agreeing with the "rotating mass" hypothesis.  I don't see how you can mimic that with a smoker.  FWWs do add rotating mass but it is low in the chassis, and any wheel mass would add unsprung weight, which is never good.

Assuming you have exhausted the usual suspension fixes (sag, fork height, etc.), I have three suggestions, two of which are free:

1. Give it some time and get used to it.  Two strokes like to "dance" over the rough stuff.  Just look ahead to where you want to go, and let the chassis do the work.  I think you will get used to it very quickly.

2. Use the "poor man's stabilizer".  Add a little torque to the steering head bearings.  It does not really make the bike feel more "planted", but it does reduce the sensation of "looseness" some bikes have.

3. Shell out the bucks for a real stabilizer.  It does not increase the stability in the vertical plane, but it sure will make you a lot more confident in the rough stuff, as they do an amazing making the bars easy to control.  I find it downright scary when I ride one of my bikes without the stabilizer.  As for the cost, yes they are expensive, but think of it as an investment.  They will probably last your riding "lifetime" with minimal expense after the initial purchase, and they can be switched from bike to bike.  Bikes come and go, but you will always have the stabilizer.  I currently switch mine (a Scotts) between two Yamahas and a KTM.  It will have a mount for every bike I own as long as I ride.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by rpt50
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4 hours ago, Monk said:

No

He's right. It'll never ride like a 4 stroke. (Thank goodness).

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