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How do I not tip over?

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I sometimes lean too far then I'm in trouble. So I have started sticking my foot out when turning in case I tip, but can that result in a really bad injury even at low speeds? (15-18mph).

I would never dare let my feet touch the floor at a faster speed than that, but at the low speeds my feet just dragged along the dirt no harm done.

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IMO there is nothing wrong with using you feet to help you BUT there is a time and place.

If I'm doing really fast (say 35 mph) open dirt trail's, I have no problems sitting down, sliding forward and using my foot while making a turn a speed.

Then if I'm in really HARD SLOW TECHNICAL terrain and I need to sit and paddle my feet to help me through I will.

Most of this is IMO hard to explain so watch OZ DRZ's vid's either in his topic here or http://crosstrainingenduro.com/

Otherwise GOOD boots are one of the best investments you can make.

 

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What kind of corners are you talking about?  Flat corners can be very scary, especially for a beginner!  And don't drag your feet....just have them out for ''balance'' and incase your front end washes out or you gas it too hard lol.  Like the above comment by filterx stated, google some videos about how to do this b/c ya, it's hard to explain. :ride: 

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All about momentum . Go faster and the leg is balance thing.  Gotabe careful I blew knee out onetime my foot cought a clump a I was bringing back to peg in deep rutted corner

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Corners on trails, with very sharp turns. the area sometimes has a incline or is flat.

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I was having trouble with the same thing for awhile (I think we're talking about the same thing anyway). I started practicing doing circles and figure eights in an open area. As I went around I tried to make them tighter and tighter. I figured out that I have to adjust my weight on the bike to make the tighter turns. I move my butt over the corner of the seat so that my upper body is straight, but my lower body is leaning with the bike. I had very little problems with corners on the trails after doing this drill once or twice.

 

If you're talking about switchbacks, you gotta watch a video.

 

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Sorry - I'm bored :)

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But seriously and IMO it is really hard to explain or even watching vids explaining basic fundamental techniques and ideally it really helps to have someone to ride with who is patient and willing to help you with the basics.

 

 

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Right now this is my biggest problem and being launched otb. I have a pair of EVS wrister gloves even that didn't prevent my hands from getting bloody. I honestly don't really know what to do when I crash. And I do have about a second to react, since the majority of the time I'm at 20mph. Should I make a fist when I fall than rather sticking my fingers out? I just have a sense it's better since I have more padding near the knuckle area.

 

I got launched otb a few weeks ago, I hit a big root and it forced my handlebars to the right and I flew off the bike. But then if I always constantly have a death grip on the handlebars my hands get agonizingly sore. I do rides that are a few hours long, plus I have a very cheap bike to begin with so the suspension fork is honestly worse than my mtb. rear suspension is almost non-existent.

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I thought of something else. When you're going into a corner at a higher speed, you're going to brake before the corner or into the corner, then lean in, with your foot out front if you're taking it really fast, then half way or 2/3 of the way around the corner give it some gas as you're coming out of the corner. Giving it gas will automatically bring the bike upright. It's hard to get used to doing this. I made myself give it gas halfway around the turn on every single turn until it became a habit. Now if I lean into the turn too much, I automatically give it gas without even thinking about it. My automatic response used to be to slow down, but that's ironically what makes you fall over.

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On 9/8/2017 at 2:50 PM, Milosh said:

I sometimes lean too far then I'm in trouble. So I have started sticking my foot out when turning in case I tip, but can that result in a really bad injury even at low speeds? (15-18mph).

I would never dare let my feet touch the floor at a faster speed than that, but at the low speeds my feet just dragged along the dirt no harm done.

Try hitting the gas when you start to tip too far over. Gyro effect and acceleration tends to stand you back up. Not too much, or your slide the back out. Just a good blip will help a lot.

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Try hitting the gas when you start to tip too far over. Gyro effect and acceleration tends to stand you back up. Not too much, or your slide the back out. Just a good blip will help a lot.


Copycat....lol. Great minds think alike!

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2 hours ago, Buttegal said:

I thought of something else. When you're going into a corner at a higher speed, you're going to brake before the corner or into the corner, then lean in, with your foot out front if you're taking it really fast, then half way or 2/3 of the way around the corner give it some gas as you're coming out of the corner. Giving it gas will automatically bring the bike upright. It's hard to get used to doing this. I made myself give it gas halfway around the turn on every single turn until it became a habit. Now if I lean into the turn too much, I automatically give it gas without even thinking about it. My automatic response used to be to slow down, but that's ironically what makes you fall over.

Sent from my SM-G930V using ThumperTalk mobile app
 

The one thing that my father and uncles told me when I started riding was "when in doubt, gas it"!  Now this isn't always the correct thing to do, but it works more often than not.

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Riding the bike will teach you most of what you need to know. When I first started riding deep sand singletrack I would fall over about once per mile. Now maybe once every 20 or so. :ride:

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Shane Watts videos will help a lot. Great insights and techniques as well as practice drills. Very inexpensive and if the information is followed will improve almost any rider's skill/fun/safety.

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Shane Watts videos will help a lot. Great insights and techniques as well as practice drills. Very inexpensive and if the information is followed will improve almost any rider's skill/fun/safety.


I've been riding street bikes for 16 years and just started in the dirt (almost 35 years young).

I took a Shane Watts class in IA this summer. Great stuff. DVDs are definitely awesome.

In class one of the first things we did was "slow races," which help with fundamental balance.

It may sound weird, but learning to ride slower will help with your balance. As Shane said in his Australian accent: "There's no slower than stopped."

We rode (standing up) as slow as possible with the primary goal of NOT putting feet down and a secondary goal of stopping. If you start to tip over, steer into the direction of the tip and counterbalance. (I.e. When tipping left, steer left and shift your weight to the right). Slip clutch as needed to stay upright. You don't need much room to do this either. (I run this drill in my back yard.)

This drill helps build your muscle memory, and the technique is applicable at 0.001 MPH or 20+MPH.
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