Jump to content

KX125 Shock Rod

Recommended Posts

Hi Members,

 

I'm dismantling a friends bike so we can fully check/service/repair it.

 

When I removed the shock I found damage to the rod, here:

 

dcaff049ac37e0b1ca69f619ad8d775c.jpg

 

Whoever "serviced" it last must have used pipe-grips or something similar to keep the rod from spinning when removing the nut.

 

My question is about whether this rod needs to be repaired (if possible) or replaced?

 

Any input will be massively appreciated.

 

Thank you in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
it will be ok - the rubber bumper stop covers it


There's no chance of seals etc travelling to that area in use? I've cleaned up the rough and jagged areas with a small file, so it's smooth again, but still ugly Lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why in the hell are you taking it apart on that end?!


The owner didn't want the actually body dismantled. I told them to rebuild the whole thing but I'm just working on what they asked, hence only working at the one end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The correct way to replace the seal is to remove the entire assembly from the shock, grind off any peening on the end of the shaft (if any) and remove the piston then seal head.  The clevis stays on the shaft unless it's damaged.  It's alot easier than trying to work how you are doing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The correct way to replace the seal is to remove the entire assembly from the shock, grind off any peening on the end of the shaft (if any) and remove the piston then seal head.  The clevis stays on the shaft unless it's damaged.  It's alot easier than trying to work how you are doing it.


Noted! Thank you for the feedback!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And good luck on getting a deal head over that end without tearing up the seal.


The worst part is, I only removed the shock from the bike. The owner of the bike removed the parts from the shock itself - so now I need to try and figure out the mess he's made.

It sounds like he's put me in an impossible situation? I'll be having a fun weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you or anyone is that concerned with the shock just buy a decent used one and swap over the shim stacks.


I did mention to him that getting another shock would be a good move for spares, now it seems a necessity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm assuming you're a little new to shock rebuilds so here's some tips so you don't get yourself in a jam.

If the shock is original, the nut holding the piston on the shaft was peened from the factory.  Wrap the shim stack/piston with some paper towels/plastic bag and gently grind off the peening just until the nut can be easily removed.  

When you remove the valving, place a screwdriver over the end of the shaft and slide the valving and piston all together to the screwdriver, that will make sure everything stays in order. Use threadlocker on the nut after it's all together and keep everything clean.

Other than that, follow the directions in the shop manual for bleeding and assembly.  I made up a funnel I use to "over fill" the shock while I bleed to try to eliminate all traces of ait.

 

shock-bleed.jpg

Edited by Jeekinz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm assuming you're a little new to shock rebuilds so here's some tips so you don't get yourself in a jam.
If the shock is original, the nut holding the piston on the shaft was peened from the factory.  Wrap the shim stack/piston with some paper towels/plastic bag and gently grind off the peening just until the nut can be easily removed.  
When you remove the valving, place a screwdriver over the end of the shaft and slide the valving and piston all together to the screwdriver, that will make sure everything stays in order. Use threadlocker on the nut after it's all together and keep everything clean.
Other than that, follow the directions in the shop manual for bleeding and assembly.  I made up a funnel I use to "over fill" the shock while I bleed to try to eliminate all traces of ait.
 
shock-bleed.jpg.01f681627cd1cd3836fdaecdcc673b8f.jpg


I really appreciate this! Thank you for taking the time to share it! I have a manual as well, so I'll get into this properly!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×