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What Tools are Needed for PDS Rebuild?

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I am interested in learning how to rebuild my own shocks for my KTM's. I know the PDS shock is one of the more complicated shocks to properly rebuild. I would like to know from someone who has experience, what tools do I need to perform this job. I have a 2004 200 SX shock that needs a rebuild. It has a factory connection bladder kit installed. Besides basic tools and a nitrogen tank else do I need?

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It's a horrible shock , you need a piston aligning tool and a bleed pump to do it right

you can't argue with stupid or Yamaha owners

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You need the WP Nitrogen adapter tool on stock nitrogen tank. You have a bladder kit and they normally have a schrader valve like Showa and Kyb.

Its nice to have the seal bullet fore the seal head and a seal head Assembly tool.

Pds should have aprox 150 psi pressure stock so if you not have the right tools its a high pressure to deal with...What your bladder kit have I don"t now but the 2016 kyb"s have aprox 165 psi.

2.5W oil. I have tried to use 5w. Its ok fore slower drivers.

I only use SKF seal heads.

The Pds have 2 pistons(valve) design with a tube finger in the bottom so air is  not easy to remove...

You can hand bleed the shock but it is very difficult and time demanding and regards a special procedure I have don it many times but first time I used a hole weekend to do it right.This is with the stock piston nitrogen tank you have a bladder kit and need a vacuum machine. I use a Lainer suspension machine.

If you don"t have experience of other shocks the Pds is not the first shock I would tried me on.

Have fun and do it right :)

 

Vacuum pumpe.jpg

Edited by Jordan Tech
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Thanks for your replies. The PDS requires some serious supplies. If I don't have these complicated vacuum pumps and tools I suppose it takes a lot of handy work. (Which I'm good at) but it might not be worth while. In all though unless I'm doing 10 of these a year it might not be worth it to buy this stuff.

I'm still open to anyone else explaining their methods or tools. Let me know.

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I was just reading the Race Tech suspension Bible. They rebuilt a 2005 sx PDS shock in the book. (instructions are a bit vague though) They show nothing in regards to a vacuum machine, is it really necessary to have that tool to rebuild a PDS shock? Can anyone lead me in the right direction into finding very exact instructions on how to rebuild one of these shocks? a link or something would be great. I possess 4 PDS shocks, an 02 exc, an 04 sx, an 05 sx, and an 07 xcw, I dont know if they will be different from one another or not.

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The old PDS(2001) manual shows how to bleed it with a bleed bottle , try to find one online ?

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Step one: Take off the bleed screw,then push the nitrogen piston to the bottom of the nitrogen tank(to the nitrogen screw)

2: Oil in the nitrogen tank(bleed screw hole) to over flow with oil(bleed screw hole ,then install the bled screw

3: Then install the nitrogen tool and set pressure to aprox one/two psi(keep the pressure to next step) you should now see oil in the tube and air boobles

4: Fill oil in the way up to over flow the tube,then install the shaft and push up and down(help it with a dead blow hammer) to get the air out of the shock

5 : Fill oil in the tube to over flow,then push down the seal head and release the pressure of the nitrogen tank when pushing the seal head down.(Seal head tool is a must :) . Lock the seal head with the lock ring(important)

6: Set the nitrogen pressure some are fore the shock you doing.The shaft shall reach the top steady from the bottom with no air noise on the top stroke

The shock have a high pressure so safety first. Have fun :)

 

Edited by Jordan Tech
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Thank you for that post, I am sure it will help me when i go to rebuild my shock.

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