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Automatic Chain Oiler

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Needing a new set of chain and sprockets for my LRP, I've been thinking a lot about chains the past couple of days. I do a good job of maintaining my chain (clean and lube every 200 - 300 miles) but I think a more rigorous chain maintenance program would pay for itself in short order. Reason being, I mainly use this bike for running around to check irrigation water. I average about 40 miles a day and oil my chain weekly. riding through the tall wet crops out to the pivot centers and pumps, the bike gets soaking wet everyday, and the chain along with it. If I had an automatic oiler to contiuously dribble a little oil on the chain, I think it would be of great benefit to the chain. Thoughts?

Does anyone one here have any experience with any automatic chain oiler? I kinda like the look of the Tutoro oiler myself...

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Go for the Tutoro. Easy install, and works perfectly. No need to tap in to the vacuum or any electronics. Just mount, adjust and drive.

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this guy had an innovative idea. he basically just strapped a can of lube to the bike and ran some tubing down to the chain. of course it looses any advantage you'd get from the pressure directly out of the can, but....lube...you got it.

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Tutoro it is, got it on my bike :thumbsup: And happy with that, needed som adjusting in the beginning to match my driving habits. Warm/cool weather might also impact the adjusting. I did remove the toolbox, because it was a bit difficult to mount it anywhere else. 

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Edited by Travellingman

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Wont that oiler just attract dust and dirt? I clean mine once a week and spray it down with belray.

 

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Not sure I understand the point of an oiler on these, or most any bike in the last couple decades since sealed chains have been pretty much standard equipment.  Where non-sealed chains need to be lubed constantly to avoid roller wear, the main point of maintenance on a sealed chain is to keep dirt from gouging seals, and keeping the chain itself from corroding.  The seals work both ways, keeping lube in, and basically everything else, including additional lube out of the moving parts of the chain.  I avoid using any wet or tacky lube, it will attract dirt and mess up seals far more than ANY lubrication benefit it might offer.  I just clean the chain with a nylon brush and cleaner when it feels gritty, then a thin coat of motul dry chainwax primarily for corrosion protection, and wipe off the excess.  Takes literally 2 minutes when my bike is on a stand to check it over.  Chains do wear, but most every time I've seen a sealed chain wear fast, it was for a simple reason, new chain on worn sprockets, left dirty or muddy, over-tightened, or damaged from cleaning with metal bristles or the wrong cleaner.

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2 hours ago, Tonestire said:

Wont that oiler just attract dust and dirt? I clean mine once a week and spray it down with belray.

 

No, not on my kind of driving anyway which is mainly on tarmac/asphalt or what you guys call it in English. Never cleaned the chain once, the oil makes the dirt fling off. 

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If you're riding on asphalt there is nothing that will get on your chain to be worried about and your just spraying oil on the road for no reason. If you clean your bike regularly your chain will look new a year from now.

If you're riding off road all that will do it provide fresh oil for dirt and sand to stick to and get ground up in your sprockets.

 

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If you're riding on asphalt there is nothing that will get on your chain to be worried about and your just spraying oil on the road for no reason. If you clean your bike regularly your chain will look new a year from now.

If you're riding off road all that will do it provide fresh oil for dirt and sand to stick to and get ground up in your sprockets.

 

 

May I Ask how long your chains usually last?

I must say I'm not sold on these arguments. I've always lubed my chains, also for offroad use.

 

Edit: let me add that I've never had to change a chain on any of my bikes. I've always sold them before the chain is worn. But that doesn't mean I don't ride much. The last bike I sold had 35000 km on the odometer, and the chain was probably good for at least 10000 more.

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On road chains last for ever. To be clear I do lube my chains (personal preference is Motul), I'm saying that there is zero reason anyone would need an automatic chain oiler especially when riding on the street.

As far as how long my chain lasts offroad I can't answer that. I just got into dirt riding and only have two seasons on my chain. It still looks great. Pre ride I lightly spray with Motul off road then post ride I hand wash, scrub it with a chain brush, WD40 to displace the water and park.

 

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If you've got an automatic chain oiler, the chain will be cleaner, and you don't have to clean the chain that often.

The difference between the oil for chain oilers and normal oil on a spraycan, is that the oil for the chain oilers isn't that sticky. The oil then gets thrown off the chain, and takes dirt/dust with it. Normal chain oil is often sticky so it sticks better to the chain, but then dirt will also stick.

I will absolutely recommend an automatic chain oiler.

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Well that all sounds very logical but sheesh, your paved streets must be pretty dirty in Norway if you need an automatic chain oiler .... I mean, come on.

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It's not like the chain is soaking wet, and we leave a trail of oil behind us. Sounds like you don't have any first hans experience with automatic chain oilers. Of course we don't want to spray the roads in oil. They would be dangerous to ride on then. I mean, come on...

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9 hours ago, Kompact said:

Well that all sounds very logical but sheesh, your paved streets must be pretty dirty in Norway if you need an automatic chain oiler .... I mean, come on.

 

Not so dirty :-) For me its all about convenience, I live in a apartment building and rent a small space for my CRF in the basement parking area. Originally designated for mopeds...

So there is practically no space for me to work on my bike, that`s why I choose the easy way about my chain maintenance. 

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18 hours ago, Kompact said:

On road chains last for ever. To be clear I do lube my chains (personal preference is Motul), I'm saying that there is zero reason anyone would need an automatic chain oiler especially when riding on the street.

As far as how long my chain lasts offroad I can't answer that. I just got into dirt riding and only have two seasons on my chain. It still looks great. Pre ride I lightly spray with Motul off road then post ride I hand wash, scrub it with a chain brush, WD40 to displace the water and park.

 

I've had nice bikes I babied with frequent chain maintenence, and others I've beat the crap out, rarely cleaning or lubing them.  In either case I've had chain and sprocket sets go 20,000 miles or more on the street, the brand of chain , and replacing along with fresh sprockets have dictated the lifespan far more than maintenece or lack thereof.  Offroad, the longest lasting chain I ever had was on my YZ125, went over 200 hours which is an eternity on an offroad bike.  It was still good when I sold my bike, was a sealed DID gold with ironman sprockets, the secret? cleaned with WD40 or Kero after every outing, was literally NEVER lubed, simply kept dirt and grit off of it, and flushed water out.  The thin coat of WD was sufficient to keep it from rusting in between rides, and basically dried out or flung off soon as I rode the next time.  For my LRP, I clean/lube it along with the rest of the bike after riding in the dirt, or every few months onroad, probably well over 1K miles inbetween.  Instead of spending time and money on a fragile and expensive system to just basically dump oil on my back wheel, I would just put it twards the next chain, and minimal maintenence.

Edited by alucard0822
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Quite literally snake oil...

 

As mentioned above, sealed o-ring type chains and their variants, need only a light coating of rust inhibitor to prevent corrosion.

 

Conventional chains DO need lubrication but not in the way that system is delivering. The oil needs to penetrate between the plates and into the pin bores. REAL motorcycle chain lube is designed to accomplish this.

Delivering whatever lite weight oil that system is dispensing will simply flinging right off at speed while riding without getting to were it needs to be. It is quite literally useless and the biggest piece of motorcycle related rubbish I have seen in a while.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Back in the day, when dinosaurs roamed the earth, and I was racing H1 and H2 Kawasaki s on the drag strip, O-Ring and X-Ring chains had yet to be invented. We would take a new chain, wind it up into the bottom of a coffee can, cover with 90 weight gear oil, and heat. This allowed the oil to penetrate into the pins and bushings, and between the side plates. Remove from heat, hand to drip dry from a coat hanger. Worked well - or until the horsepower broke them.

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On 21.9.2017 at 10:08 PM, ohiodrz400sm said:

Quite literally snake oil...

 

As mentioned above, sealed o-ring type chains and their variants, need only a light coating of rust inhibitor to prevent corrosion.

 

Conventional chains DO need lubrication but not in the way that system is delivering. The oil needs to penetrate between the plates and into the pin bores. REAL motorcycle chain lube is designed to accomplish this.

Delivering whatever lite weight oil that system is dispensing will simply flinging right off at speed while riding without getting to were it needs to be. It is quite literally useless and the biggest piece of motorcycle related rubbish I have seen in a while.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You really need to read up about automatisk chain oilers, this is just rubbish LOL 

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