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What's the Best NON-synthetic 2 cycle oil to use for top end break in?

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I've rebuilt a few top ends now and I know everyone has their own opinion about break in... but the guy who's trusted here in the Midwest and does a ton of these bore and hone jobs said whatever you do... heat cycle and run a few tanks of non synth to help it seat the rings and break in correctly or I could glaze the jug with synthetic oil. I'm having trouble finding non synth other than Bell-ray mineral oil. Anyone know of other good NON-synth for break in ?

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Ok ,I know yamalube ,motul and castrol all make a mineral oil ,not sure about other brands but would think most will do or have a semi instead

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Sounds good, I'll take a look at the yamalube. I've always had good luck with Yamaha products. I'm surprised but I couldn't find a Honda non synth. I'm breaking in a 1988 CR125... still waiting on shroud decals and new pro link stickers for the swing arm but it should be a fun little bike.

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Choose an oil and use it forever. Period. You are over thinking this.

I've been told by many not to use synthetic for break in and I just spent a ton of money getting this thing back to good working order so I want to make sure I get the best break in out of my new motor. I typically run Honda full synthetic but was told not to until the rings seat

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IMO using excessive lube on the cylinder, piston and ring during the rebuild will have more 

of an effect on initial break in (and the risk of glazing the ring) versus a mineral or synthetic.

 

In most cases, being too easy on the engine is worse than pushing it hard after a proper warm up and heat cycle.

Edited by mlatour
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IMO using excessive lube on the cylinder, piston and ring during the rebuild will have more 
of an effect on initial break in (and the risk of glazing the ring) versus a mineral or synthetic.
 
In most cases, being too easy on the engine is worse than pushing it hard after a proper warm up and heat cycle.

Thanks for the info

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As an example, a few years ago getting back into MX I purchased a brand new YZ125,

broke it in riding quite easy using the suggested 15:1 in the manual.

 

At the end of the season with only 15 hours done I preventatively replaced the piston & ring. 

Despite evidently not much wear, that piston showed signs of excessive blow-by past the ring.

 

I've since put many hours on that engine and up to my 4th piston by now,

during each rebuild I now barely lube the cylinder and after a gradual warm up,

break it at 32:1 (synthetic) riding in the same fashion I normally do.

 

The used pistons don't show any extra wear but more importantly, no signs of blow-by or glazing are apparent.

 

I owned a 1986 CR125R myself, even back then that engine came with a nikasil plated cylinder.

Not sure about your '88 but the recommended premix ratio for the '86 was 20:1 

Edited by mlatour
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Yep you go it,

-upon the initial start no excessive idling, 

-gradual warm up riding at a moderate pace, don't wring it out if it loads up

-once the engine is up to operating temps, ride it normally for 10-15 minutes,

- you can accelerate hard but no sustained high rpms or lugging.

 

Let it cool off completely, check for leaks, make necessary adjustments etc.

 

For good measure you can do this procedure twice but after the first 15 minutes,

it's likely all the 'break in' has already been done.

 

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15 hours ago, mlatour said:

during each rebuild I now barely lube the cylinder and after a gradual warm up,

break it at 32:1 (synthetic) riding in the same fashion I normally do.

 

:thumbsup:

Don't baby it, but don't beat race style till it seats.

Same principle applies to 4t also.

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14 hours ago, maximkushner said:

So basically, just ride it like I normally do after a few heat cycles and let the pressure built up in he cylinder to seat the rings ? That's all. No slow break in ?

Exactly. Pressure is what forces the rings out against the cylinder, so you want to give it some throttle. 90% of the heat in the piston leaves via ring contact with the cylinder, so you don't want to overheat it before the rings have seated. Excess assembly oil in the ring grooves will prevent the pressure from getting behind the rings and seating them.

There is a saying,"Break it in slow, and it will be slow." That said, don't hammer it, but don't be timid either. Heat cycling is cheap insurance to not cook the piston before the rings are seated. :thumbsup:

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What's the difference between semi synthetic and synthetic? (besides the obvious answer of coarse lol)   Semi Synthetic is cheaper so i'd like to know if it's ok to run instead of 100% synthetic.  Thanks.

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4 minutes ago, Slicing-Air said:

What's the difference between semi synthetic and synthetic? (besides the obvious answer of coarse lol)   Semi Synthetic is cheaper so i'd like to know if it's ok to run instead of 100% synthetic.  Thanks.

Motorcycle Consumer News tests found that the blends actually performed as well as the 'synthetics'.

I say 'synthetics' because Type IV synthetic, Mobil and many others, are actually a stabilized Type III dino oil.  Rotella T6 is one of these.

If you want to run a blend, I recommend you blend yourself, so you know how much 'synthetic' you're actually getting.

I run a blend of Redline, which is a true Type V synthetic ester based turbine oil and T6.

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23 minutes ago, Bermudacat said:

Motorcycle Consumer News tests found that the blends actually performed as well as the 'synthetics'.

I say 'synthetics' because Type IV synthetic, Mobil and many others, are actually a stabilized Type III dino oil.  Rotella T6 is one of these.

If you want to run a blend, I recommend you blend yourself, so you know how much 'synthetic' you're actually getting.

I run a blend of Redline, which is a true Type V synthetic ester based turbine oil and T6.

Thanks for the info.  The oil is from Samurai racing

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