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I was thinking this may be possibly true and the manual seems to have confirmed. What do you guys think?

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I was planning okkn going up 2 teeth in the rear from day 1 and I'm glad I did then since my curious mind is curious quite a bit I was thinking with taller rear sprocket the bike may potentially be able to hold a constant faster speed in the tighter terrain there for running cooler..

So in the manual it just simply states adjust secondary drive (rear sprocket) for road conditions i.e. tight or wide open. 

Am I correct?

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Not really sure what the question is, so in that case, YES, you are correct :facepalm: :p

The book is claiming that putting a larger rear sprocket on when running slower terrain helps keep the bike cooler based on the fact that you will not be using the clutch as much.  So I guess based on that reason, yes, you were right to shorten the gearing for your tighter terrain riding.

Dave

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Secondary drive ratio refers to both the front and rear sprocket.  Going bigger on the front is the same as going smaller on the back.  What the manual is telling you is that a tall final drive ratio, as in a big front sprocket or a small rear sprocket, can require excessive clutch slippage in technical riding resulting in high oil temps.

They're just reminding you that clutch abuse can cause overheating.  Tall gearing does not necessarily require clutch abuse.

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