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Odd sound when I ran the valves

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So I ran the overhead on my 250 last Friday. One intake was so tight I couldn't get a .0015 under it. The other intake was at .006. Both exhaust were at .009. So I got it done but noticed a weird sound when rolling it over by hand with the valve cover off. It gurgles. Sounds like blowing air through water. I heard the decomp click too but I was expecting that. Not the gurgle though.  Also. She ran great this weekend, better than ever. It was noticeably harder to kick over too. But I had a small crash near the end of the day and when I went to start her back up it kicked over very easily. Almost like a two stroke. And has done that when it gets hot every since. I rechecked the overhead today and the valve that was really tight before has tightened up some more. It's down to .0025 already. Advice?

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Hahahaha. I remember when i first did my heads and heard that gargle. Basically, its the oil pump pumping oil around, but because the heads off here is air in the engine so it blows air bubbles and gargles dont worry about it at all. What year is your bike. 2004-2006 had valve issues, i have an 04 and did a full head rebuild and ive never had to do valves again

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My bike is a 2004. That explains that, but what about the kicking over so easily. I can kick start it by hand when she gets hot. I am trying to track down an adapter for my compression tester to check the compression. The valves were tighter than they are now and it kicked harder. 

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Valves need adjustment because they have either worn into the seat or the seat has worn into the valve. Titanium valves have a hard coating that in time wears away where they seal against the seat. When this happens they tighten and need adjustment. After adjustment the seats will wear into the valve much faster without the hard coating. Another adjustment is needed in just a few hours. If you continue to adjust the valves and run the bike, the outer ring of the valve will break destroy your engine. If you have valves that are needing that much adjustment, pull the head, send it off and get it reworked before you have much more to deal with.

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Valves need adjustment because they have either worn into the seat or the seat has worn into the valve. Titanium valves have a hard coating that in time wears away where they seal against the seat. When this happens they tighten and need adjustment. After adjustment the seats will wear into the valve much faster without the hard coating. Another adjustment is needed in just a few hours. If you continue to adjust the valves and run the bike, the outer ring of the valve will break destroy your engine. If you have valves that are needing that much adjustment, pull the head, send it off and get it reworked before you have much more to deal with.


Listen to every word darrell said.. i did a full valve replacement, sent my head to get the seats cut, and got new OEM titanium valves. Haven't had to shim my valves for over a month now. Before i had to re shim them every ride. Trust me man im so glad i redid my valves. Worth every cent i spent.

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Yeah I'm trying to find a shop near me that can cut em now. What's the recommended choice of valves for mostly trail riding. 

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I've had good luck with Kibblewhite valves. You can either get the whole set, or an intake kit (the OEM exhaust valves are stainless steel). If you get the full set, you'll need their spring kit. If you get just the intake kit, it comes with the springs, spring seats, valve guide seals and retainers. I prefer to use OEM valve guide seals, and also I would replace all the keepers too.

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They make both, but are more commonly known for their stainless steel valves, which I would recommend for trail riding for their durability. The CRF intake kit (ss valves) is around $170.

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With the cost of the valves and machine work wouldn't I be better off to find a complete used 08 head cam and all and just bolt that on? They don't have the same issues do they?

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The choice is yours but you may still have issues with the intake valves, as well as running the other used parts. If it were me, I would spend the $120 to get the seats cut, the $170 for the Kibblewhite intake valve kit, and $140 for the OEM exhaust valves and other parts. Then you know everything is new, and will last a long time.

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Good point. Isn't the 08 cam the one that makes more power?

Anything 07 and up no longer has the valve issues, they make the same power as the earlier year but the power delivery is different. If your riding trails you really do need that bottom end power and often stainless steel cant move as fast as titanium. If i where you i would go with OEM intake valves which are titanium, along with valve seals and new springs. All should cost no more than 200. Unless you race and rev out the bike really hard on limiter all the time. Don't be using kibblewhite stainless.

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