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Best way to paint rims/spokes

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My son has a crf50, stock.  The front rim is a little egg shaped so I picked up a good used one that is true, but it's painted gold.

My wife had the idea that over the winter I should strip the gold rim and paint both the rear and gold rim red/black.  The kid is beside himself for the color red and I know he'd love it.

Not sure what will be red or black, but I'm not really interested in anything expensive like professional painting or powder coating, likely just rattle can.  I'm will to do the prep work and tape things off, but was curious if anyone can give me some pointers for stripping the gold paint off the rim (was thinking either sand blast or wire wheel), and then maybe a good primer/wheel paint to use.

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It may be a little acetone takes the gold right off.  I think the spray bomb you want for the black rims and red hub is the Plastidip brand. I would not paint the spokes, but if he really wants the spokes red, use the spoke skins.

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The gold should be anodizing if it's stock. Nothing will take it off short of sanding/blasting, but you don't need to. Give it a sand with some 600 grit to rough it up, then hit it with some etch primer (you can get it in spray cans), it'll stick to anodizing no problem. Let that dry properly then just spray red enamel over it. Horrible gooey stuff, but it resists chipping and flaking well, and it comes in a spray can. You could even use brake caliper paint instead for a little more durability.

Don't use plasti-dip unless you plan on removing it later, it's a rubber like coating designed to be removable. (unless they make something different over there?)

Do the same with the spokes, but you'll need to mask off where they go through the hub, and obviously the threaded part if you paint them while it's apart.

Edited by DEATH_INC.
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1 hour ago, DEATH_INC. said:

The gold should be anodizing if it's stock. Nothing will take it off short of sanding/blasting, but you don't need to.

casutic soda will take it off - mix it up in a tub

 

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I don't think it's anodized. The guy that sold it to me said he sprayed it, plus I believe all crf stock rims are chrome.

So, an enamel paint. I'll check that out. What about the special paint for rims? I'd love to get be able to get it a sort of metallic chrome red (not metal flake).

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Powder-coat or anodizing is going to hold up the longest. 

I'll second the Plasti-Dip as an alternative.  I'd heard a lot of good things about it, and didn't really believe it till I tried it out myself.  And that stuff's pretty cool.  Couple guys have "dipped" truck rims and bumpers with good results. 

Clean the part well - cleaner like simple green to get the big stuff off, then go over it with alcohol to really clean and prep the surface.  Mask off what needs to be masked, then do a couple coats of plasti-dip. 

I hosed down the swing arm on my moto a couple years ago.  Still holding up real well.  There's a few spots where it's worn down, big one is under the kickstand where that rubs sometimes.  Otherwise it's stayed black and held up really well to the year-round abuse. 

IMG_20160809_213145423-L.jpg

 

On my sled I dipped the air vents on the hood

IMG_20170730_165010706-L.jpg

 

as well as the bumper and seat bracket.

IMG_20170730_194206140-L.jpg

 

So we'll see how that holds up through the upcoming season.  Honestly i'm not too worried about it, and it's real easy to touch up or remove if it does get wrecked.

DSC_7960_-L.jpg

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Its a CRF50 so do it  with spray can for right material .

Dont overcomplicate it, and it takes minutes to spray again when you got some scratches or if he lay down the bike

If you are going to anadoize the hubs for example , you must take every spoke every part off, and do a solvent clean in every squareinch of every thing you are anadoiziing

Its not done so fast., that people make it sound!!

Maby buy Chinese wheels at ebay instead , the are prety cheap and its not a big risk for a 50cc bike

 

Edited by skorpan777

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So, I have always thought about us pasti-dip for smaller things on my harley - alot of guys use it on small parts instead of getting it powdercoated etc.

It is definitely an option - but I wonder how the sheen/appearance will look on rims.  Will it looks like gooey paint caked on?  Or matte finish?   I'd love to have that anodized chrome look that this stuff claims to provide:

http://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/auto/specialty-paints/metal-coat/

Think something like this would work ok?  Its just on his little 50 and he's 4...

 

Actually, I just came across dupli-color's metal cast paint...I might try that out too - lots of videos and pics of good looking projects...

Edited by apbling

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Just to update you guys.... I bought some metalcast paint that's supposed to look like anodizing.  After I purchased the paint and had the rims off and read to paint, I noticed plastidip not only has alot of color options, but also some metal flake spray as well.  I did some more research and decided to give the plastidip a shot.  It's reasonably priced at my local hardware store and seemed easy enough to apply and if it didn't turn out, well I could peel it off.   I was told to get the most vibrant red color you need to lay down a white base coat first.  So I mounted the new tire, inflated it to make sure all was well, then deflated and broke the bead.  Taped off the tire and the brake drum/hub and went to town.  What I can say thus far is it looks ok.  Not great, but ok.  I noticed the can is very temperature sensative - My garage is insultated and heated, but I found I need to keep the can inside the house for the best results and I need to clean the nozzle with a rag frequently, otherwise its throws small blobs instead of a finer spray.  I got lucky and the blobs self leveled and it looks ok, but at first I wasn't real happy.  You also have to watch for runs - if you get the can too far away you don't get hardley any coverage - too close and it'll pool up quickly.  This makes the inside portion of the hub very tricky to get done.  The attached photo is the rear wheel with about 4 coats of red on top of the white base coat.  I'll let this cure and top it with a little of the silver metalizer to give it some sparkle and then maybe the glossifier to give it a nice sheen.  I have black spoke skins then to finish it off.

I also used the flat black on his stock forks.  That laid down perfectly and much easier.  Not sure if I'll glossifiy or metalize it yet though.

All in all, its just for my 5 year olds CRF50 and he'll likely think it looks awesome.  Once he gets some dirt on it noone will notice my hack dip job.   Not sure how the ppl that have youtube videos of them doing rims and entire cars get such a good finish - definitely have better skills than myself. 

Also, don't judge my messy bench... its usually not that bad...HAHA

IMG_0024.jpg

Edited by apbling
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45 minutes ago, apbling said:

IMG_0024.jpg.e48299d11a933dbf81eaedb401fdbcef.jpg.1d2888361315542074fcd7f48ed2034d.jpg

 

 

Thats alot of masking tape   :eek:  I have a good way of painting wheels with the tire still on using a cutout template - and no masking tape  :D

Mainly just to do a temp job trailer wheels / car wheels etc.....

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I thought of use playing cards or a cutout, but figured I'd just use the tape.  it didn't take long, except for the tape not pulling off the roll nicely... I have yet to find masking tape that doesn't do that though.  Plus, I wanted to be thorough.  haha.   It's bad enough I'm not really good at laying this down, didn't want overspray on the tire as well.

I did do some searching - people say to shake the ever living crap out of this stuff, more than the label recommends even.  Others put the cans in hot water just before spraying.  I think next time around I'll leave the rim in the house and the cans too.  Then toss them in hot water, shake the hell out of them, then go out and spray.  Even though I had my heater set to 68 and the garage was warm, it was 40 overnight so all the objects (like rims and cans of plastidip) weren't that warm.

I intentionally did the rear wheel first - its a little more hidden than the front one, so I figured I'd learn on the rear, do better on the front.

Edited by apbling

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If you want more info on dipping check out Dipyourcar.com I got my dip from them and they sell a "dip nozzle" for a few bucks that makes the dip spray better. Keeping the cans in warm water is a good technique. I would also suggest that the more coats the better and do very light coats. You should see bare metal after the first coat. 
I dipped the wheels on my truck and they still looked good after 4 years. I'm getting ready to dip my whole truck. 

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9 hours ago, apbling said:

I thought of use playing cards or a cutout, but figured I'd just use the tape.  it didn't take long, except for the tape not pulling off the roll nicely... I have yet to find masking tape that doesn't do that though. 

Another good way - and the quickest way is to use a rag between the rim and tire when deflated bead off the rim - poke the rag in and around the rim then inflate

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X1 mike - I looked at dipyourcar vids and even contacted them about red dip with silver metalizer over the top (the red metalizer looks purpleish/maroon), but I did not get any supplies from them because my local/regional home depot type store had the cans of dip for about $5, whereas autozone and some places online are $7-12.  I will be checking out this nozzle though!

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Hey guys - I just sprayed the silver metalizer on the rim and I think it looks very nice.  I may have given it one coat too many and it started to take on a lighter red shade, but thats ok, the boy will still love it.  I do have some texture from the original white/red basecoats, but after warming the cans in hot water and using the 2.0 nozzle from dipyourcar I think I'll be laying down nice smooth coats on the other rim.

One thing I've noticed though - after 5 hrs of sitting in my heated basement, the plastidip was still "soft" - it wasn't tacky, it had some grip (which I believe is normal?) but it felt soft.  I could easily indent it with my fingernail if I pushed hard enough.  Is this normal or do I just need to let it fully cure overnight?  Also, since there is a little texture and some grip to this finish, how will I deal with cleaning it?  Just hose it off with water?  At its current state, I don't think I could run a rag over it easily to dry it after washing either.

IMG_0062.jpg

Edited by apbling
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7 hours ago, apbling said:

Hey guys - I just sprayed the silver metalizer on the rim and I think it looks very nice.  I may have given it one coat too many and it started to take on a lighter red shade, but thats ok, the boy will still love it.  I do have some texture from the original white/red basecoats, but after warming the cans in hot water and using the 2.0 nozzle from dipyourcar I think I'll be laying down nice smooth coats on the other rim.

One thing I've noticed though - after 5 hrs of sitting in my heated basement, the plastidip was still "soft" - it wasn't tacky, it had some grip (which I believe is normal?) but it felt soft.  I could easily indent it with my fingernail if I pushed hard enough.  Is this normal or do I just need to let it fully cure overnight?  Also, since there is a little texture and some grip to this finish, how will I deal with cleaning it?  Just hose it off with water?  At its current state, I don't think I could run a rag over it easily to dry it after washing either.

 

Glad the dip nozzle worked for you.

 

As far as washing if you search YouTube "washing a dipped car" there are plenty of results. They sell cleaning products for dip but in reality wash as normal and you are good to go. Personally I have only dipped wheels on my truck and they lasted a long time. After curing for a week or so there was no tackiness.

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I emailed the dipyourcar guys and they said the metalizer does take a little longer to full harden.  I checked it this morning and it was significantly better than Monday.  They also had mentioned the dip coat protective spray.  It's a little pricey, so I'm not sure if I'll try that or not.

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