Jump to content

Clake One Light

Recommended Posts

So I bought a clake for my 2016 300rr right away and hardly used the stock master cylinder. I used it a few times and recognized that it was rather heavy, too heavy for riding super technical stuff where your 1 fingering the clutch almost constantly.

Anyway long story short, fast forward 2 seasons.

I'm considering getting something like the Midwest Mountain clever lever, the problem I have with the clake is that while it drastically reduced pull weight, it also (im assuming) uses a larger cylinder to push more fluid to maintain the stock pull distance. (or at least not increase it significantly like a standard over leveraging mechanism to reduce pull weight, IE the clever lever).

The problem I have is that the clake feels like it has a really tiny amount engagement space. I have the tiniest window where I can 'feather' the clutch. It's often all in or out, very little in between. That makes it really hard to hold the clutch at 'half' engagement or anywhere between all the way in or out.

The distance between the clutch being fully engaged or fully disengaged, feels like its only maybe a centimeter. Instead of the disengagement feeling (relatively) linear, it feels very logarithmic.

 

Has anyone else had the same experience with the clake? It's pretty much been this way for me since day one, though early on I didn't notice it as much, until I rode for a good while and got comfortable on the bike and really started to get into more technical stuff I really started to notice it, then one day I swapped bikes with my buddy who had a 2016 TE300 (stock clutch) and was blown away by how much more linear the pull was, I felt like I had miles of play to work the clutch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The midwest will do the opposite, give you a longer engagement threshold (sound like just what you want).  I have one on my 250RR and really like it.  Allows you to get super precise with your slipping.  I have no experience with the clake so I can't speak for that.  

Edited by NW_drZ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need  to play with the adjust knob, sounds like you have it to far in, you need to find your happy spot with it, if not PM me I could use a spare. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, ktm300 said:

You need  to play with the adjust knob, sounds like you have it to far in, you need to find your happy spot with it, if not PM me I could use a spare. 

The adjuster knob only adjust the pull weight no?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just installed one on my 500 RR-S. I have 3 rides under my belt since then. I feel it is has a pretty wide engagement for me actually. Will be going to Colorado in 2 days for a week of long rides so we will see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, ktm300 said:

You need  to play with the adjust knob, sounds like you have it to far in,

This was my first thought!  if I wind that dial in to where the clutch pull is ridiculously easy, it become difficult  to feather.  It puts so much tension on the spring that the lever blow right though the "feather" portion of the stroke.

I have thought about adding the larger 350 slave to my 300 to spread out the "feather" zone and still keep the knob wound in...or maybe just leave it in the middle and deal with the slightly harder (still stupid easy) pull.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, gr4vitas said:

The adjuster knob only adjust the pull weight no?

The pull adjuster knob does only adjust the pull weight but there are side affects.  If you get it too far in or out things can feel a little wonky.

Make sure you have the lever itself adjust so that it has the max amount of travel.  There are also some internal adjustments that can change the starting position of the master cylinder.

I never had an engagement issue with mine while i had it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Each to their own I guess but I really can't wrap my head around the need for these super light pull mechanisms unless you have an injury or health issue. The modern bikes with hydraulic clutches have such an easy pull. I'm old, not big or strong and even when riding nasty technical stuff feathering the clutch all day I don't find the clutch to be a contributor to fatigue. 

Maybe this will help

spring_zpsbrckhlaf.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Each to their own I guess but I really can't wrap my head around the need for these super light pull mechanisms unless you have an injury or health issue. The modern bikes with hydraulic clutches have such an easy pull. I'm old, not big or strong and even when riding nasty technical stuff feathering the clutch all day I don't find the clutch to be a contributor to fatigue. 
Maybe this will help
spring_zpsbrckhlaf.jpg


My 17' 250rr compared to my buddies 17' 300xc is night and day. The Beta is much harder to pull stock. His KTM is nice and light. I was surprised by the difference. When I got my Beta that was the first thing I noticed, the stiffer clutch pull. Midwest lever rectified that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Each to their own I guess but I really can't wrap my head around the need for these super light pull mechanisms unless you have an injury or health issue. The modern bikes with hydraulic clutches have such an easy pull. I'm old, not big or strong and even when riding nasty technical stuff feathering the clutch all day I don't find the clutch to be a contributor to fatigue. 
Maybe this will help
spring_zpsbrckhlaf.jpg


Personally I have no issue with the stock pull but I understand if your riding technical stuff, cross training, etc. where more than average clutch use is the norm it's an advantage, primarily for the ability to use one finger. If I did that type of riding exclusively I might be looking for a lighter pull as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the light pull and the one finger lever, I run my levers close to the bars and end up with calculus on the top of my fingers on a normal lever.

I went from making AA one year to struggling to finish an enduro the next from one of those F'ing ticks, before they figured out the problem I was loosing the use of my fingers staring with the thumbs, the Clake helped allot.   

I have mine close to the bars, and the engagement is short and easier than stock Beta, I prefer to have my three other fingers firmly on the bars in technical switch back turns with the front up in the air. 

      

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×