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How much weight can realistically be taken off?

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So I've ridden a couple of CRF250Ls, and I'm interested in them, but there's just too much weight for me to be comfortable with off road.

I did some searching, and found one post where someone was able to shave off nearly 20 pounds with some basic mods, but i was wondering if it's straight forward to do better then that? Ideally I'd want the thing under 300 pounds.

Is that reasonable, or is this machine just too inherently heavy to do that?

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At the end of the day the bike has a steel frame and so is never going to be as light as a proper Enduro bike, it's a cheap trail bike and so has been built to a price.

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2017 CRF250L Weight: 317.5 lbs.

2018/2017 other dual sport weights (info from manufacturer):

  • Suzuki DR200S: 278 lbs.
  • Suzuki DR-Z400S 317 lbs.
  • Yamaha WR250R 295 lbs.
  • Kawasaki KLX250 304.0 lbs.
  • KTM EXC-F 250 235 lbs.
  • Husqvarna  FE-250 238 lbs.

Any thoughts on how the Husqvarna and KTM models are much lighter?

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2 hours ago, JACOB JAKE said:

Any thoughts on how the Husqvarna and KTM models are much lighter?

Nearly double the price, and much higher running costs.

Not the same class of bike

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There is around 10lbs you can toss by swapping to an aftermarket exhaust, might get it down near 300# with a lithium battery and ditching the emissions component, toolbox, and rear fender assembly.  Weighed mine at 306lbs with about 3/4 tank of fuel, FMF exhaust, DRD rear tail light, and nothing else, went back up to about 310 with handguards and a skidplate, Warp9 SUMO conversion and Racetech suspension were basically weight neutral.  Honestly I can't tell the difference between 10# or so in weight on this bike.  Other bikes are lighter for one reason or another, the WR250R replaces some steel with aluminum, is a bit skinnier, a little lighter engine etc.  The dramatic difference in weight with the KTM and Husky is simply because they are not comparible bikes.  The CRF250L has road bike guts on a steel frame with offorad-ish geometry, chassis layout, and bodywork.  THe Euro dualsorts cost a lot more, run full aluminum/ composite frames, and are basically enduro bikes with the absolute minnimum needed to be street legal.  They are more comparable to the CRF250X/R, skinny chassis, peaky high power engines, skinny seats, and generally bad road manners.  There is no way a CRF250L could hang with one offroad, but considering the FE250 has to change pistons and suspension fluid about as frequently as the CRF-L changes oil and plugs, there is a significant tradeoff.

Edited by alucard0822
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If weight is your concern then this is not the bike for you.

As far as shaving some pounds off it's like a 400 lbs man getting down to 372lbs - good for him and all but he's still a big fat man.

 

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Under 300 is absurd unless you fab a new frame. Mine is 305-310, measured by scale under each wheel, yeah, I have heard the crap! The mild steel frame is the killer as with most bikes in this category. Live with it or buy a more race oriented bike. Everybody wants to play Pygmalian!

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If you want light, here you go.

Probably the best way to lose weight, is do what I'm doing.

Get sick and lose some body fat. Figure I could use to shed 10 or 15 pounds. Maybe a bit more by next spring.

 

The CRF250L sounds heavy, but from my experience it doesn't feel that heavy when riding off road. Seems pretty balanced and carries it's weight low. Now I haven't done super technical single track, but have had it on a few decent trails.

Pro-Specs.png

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Mine is 305 done most weight savings possible (lithium battery, removed factory exhaust etc) the weight is felt on single track for sure, I am In decent shape 185 lbs and feel I am cooked after a few hours.

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I went the other direction on mine. Added some cargo mods, fuel packs, and such, and mine's probably close to 350 pounds. It's fine on the trails, even single track, until I wipe out and then I'm often exhausted by the time I get it free of whatever mess I made.

I miss my CRF230L on the trails. But the 250 is so much better on the road so there's a compromise either way.

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2 hours ago, RudeJeepin said:

The CRF250L sounds heavy, but from my experience it doesn't feel that heavy when riding off road.

Agreed that the weight is fine for easy trails and gravel roads, it's the tighter stuff that let's you know the difference between a real enduro bike and a bloated DS with a steel frame. 

Come ride in the BC woods which are tight and twisty with lots of obstacles to get up and over, you'll quickly wish the bike was 75+lbs lighter!

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Much will depend on how the bike is ridden as the posters above illustrate, weight isn't always bad, especially for a bike that is designed as a compromise to do many things.  Weight is a hindrance to a lot of enduro techniques to clear obstacles, tougher to loft the front, tougher to hop over things, tougher to pull the bike up and over, it sinks into soft surfaces more, tougher to pick up when dropped.  Tthe more skilled and aggressive you are(and judging by Cyclic's videos he's plenty of both), the more the weight works against you.  Most of my offroad experience was years ago on a 200# YZ125, first time I had my CRF250L on a trail I quickly found out using similar techniques would get me hurt, and I got worn out fast.  The weight isn't necessarily bad though, gives more traction on some terrain, and being that weight is low, it's more stable, especially onroad, or higher speeds.  It will just tractor through rough ground, has plenty of momentum to use to get over things, the low seat height makes it easy to get feet down, and the low CG actually makes it easy to go up steep terrain or roost and slide under power much faster than I would be comfortable on with a taller, lighter  bike.  Didn't take my YZ onroad much, but it was seriously twitchy, I'm sure things like the windblast from a semi on the highway, or leaning over for a high speed turn would be terrifying compared to the heavier, and more stable LRP.

Edited by alucard0822
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