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carterkendall

hitch carriers, the good, the bad, the ugly

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Know 2 people who had broke pegs on the haulers that don't support the wheels. IMO, pegs are fine when compressing against the suspension, but there is too much force on them sitting on the frame bouncing and leveraging on the back of a truck.  The lift jack is nice hauling a heavy bike that would be hard to roll up a ramp, but i'd find another way of securing it besides the pegs.  ymmv

Edited by highmarker

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If your vehicle has a roof rack, consider fabricating a bar that connects to the roof rack and can be attached to the bike at/near the bars/stem. Massively reduces tip risk and makes the strap on / strap off process super easy as it holds the bike vertically for you.

 

IMG_2545.JPG

 

https://thumpertalk.com/applications/tapatalk/index.php?/topic/1250632-Hitch-Carrier%3A-under-frame-vs%2E-under-the-wheels%3F/page__view__findpost__p__14260070

 

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7 hours ago, Tahoe Gator said:

If your vehicle has a roof rack, consider fabricating a bar that connects to the roof rack and can be attached to the bike at/near the bars/stem. Massively reduces tip risk and makes the strap on / strap off process super easy as it holds the bike vertically for you.

 

IMG_2545.JPG

 

https://thumpertalk.com/applications/tapatalk/index.php?/topic/1250632-Hitch-Carrier%3A-under-frame-vs%2E-under-the-wheels%3F/page__view__findpost__p__14260070

 

That gas can arrangement is  wayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy spooky!!! :facepalm:

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With my UMX in addition to the foot peg bolts, I strap each end of the bike to each corner of the truck frame/bumper.  This keeps the bike/carrier from rocking so much in the receiver.  The difference in having those straps and not having them is night and day.  That tip was passed on to me by a fellow rider at a dirt bike class, he was helping me load at the end of the weekend.  I hauled in without using the straps and I hauled out with, the difference I saw on the same bouncy caliche road on/off the property had me sold.  Plus other trips I've hit some gnarly sections on the FM roads at 70mph that I thought I was surely going to lose the bike, or break something, and it all held together.   The idea with the straps is similar to the outrigger support so many guys have used to modify their hitch carriers.  Obviously the lift support is not there with the strap, but the movement is more under control.

If I were to buy the UMX, I'd get the ramp version that supports the wheels. That looks like a good mix of the two methods - ramp and lift.

My truck sits high without a lift, Ram 2500 4wd diesel, the UMX system is safer for me to load by myself, one handed,  vs other methods.  As far as the "difficulty" of carrying the tools to operate the hauler, perhaps I'm not seeing the issue, or use to using tools on a normal basis.  It's a hydraulic bottle jack w handle, and I run a hitch stabilizer bracket, so a 19mm socket, ratchet and combo wrench for that grade 8 bolt I secure at the beginning and the end of the trip.  These tools are already in the truck on a normal basis.  What's the issue again?

Edited by Monica

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Anybody have experience with the add-a-bike carriers and which one

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On 10/31/2017 at 8:43 PM, carterkendall said:

Hey guys! Looking for everyones input on hitch carriers. I did a ton of research when i was shopping and i was lured into buying the "ultimate mx hauler". I liked the design with no tie downs and how it lowered down and had the hydraulic lift. After using it a few times id almost rather tow a small trailer. Is anyone else kinda bummed on how long it takes to load a bike on the ultimate mx hauler as well as tools being required? 

these links below seem to have a different design but there isnt much info or reviews out there...i may just go back to the ramp style with tie downs.

http://racknroll.com.au/?product=rack-n-roll-enduro-mx-carrier-copy

http://www.808ds.com/web/index.php?siteid=401&pageid=3066

 

 

What I do not want is to push a bikebup a ramp and the hauler is great. I also drive down forest roads 40 miles at a time with  the bike on the hauler and I can  4 wheel rain ruts  and  never worry about hitting the bike as I have mine on a  raised extended  receiver .   I can put my tail gate down with it on and work on the bike too.  

Looks funny as hell but after 4 years of this I can say for me I have dialed perfect as I can get back anywhere  with this combination to do things I will not mention.   Hell I can go anywhere the 4 wheeler  guys go with bike.  

Not for everyone for sure but I am just 4 miles from BLM lands and National Forest lands

90A665DE-6F3A-46D6-9D7C-54ECAF465C24.jpeg

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30 minutes ago, Babyarmholdingapple said:

What I do not want is to push a bikebup a ramp and the hauler is great. I also drive down forest roads 40 miles at a time with  the bike on the hauler and I can  4 wheel rain ruts  and  never worry about hitting the bike as I have mine on a  raised extended  receiver .   I can put my tail gate down with it on and work on the bike too.  

Looks funny as hell but after 4 years of this I can say for me I have dialed perfect as I can get back anywhere  with this combination to do things I will not mention.   Hell I can go anywhere the 4 wheeler  guys go with bike.  

Not for everyone for sure but I am just 4 miles from BLM lands and National Forest lands

 

That's good you can put your tailgate down.  That is the biggest drawback that I do not like with the UMX, I can't put mine down.  I might be able to if I used a dropped receiver hitch adapter, but didn't want to compromise ground clearance.  May try though to see how it works.

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Cant say enough good things about this hauler. Worth every penny.

F9D4C7C6-757E-483E-BFF2-807532B78E90.jpeg.fd6991f1dd0601bd9740cad3613297ad.jpegC6A756E4-254C-43A3-89D3-903AE090DC11.jpeg.54f7329a0ed313eaa2eaa016e29ccefc.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

I have the Harbor Freight carrier, an enclosed 5 X 8 trailer, and a 28' Toy Hauler.

I use the 5 X 8 Enclosed trailer most often.  For One, Two, or Three guys this little trailer is easy and everything is out of sight and secure.

Toy hauler for over night trips with multiple riders.

Over night it's the 5 X 8 for myself in cooler temps.

Edited by Center Punch

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After borrowing a couple of hitch racks to try them out and watching other riders load and unload their bikes I bought a MotoTote.  It is one of the toughest racks I have come across. It is easy to load, holds the bike securely, and offers good clearance for traveling rutted out forest roads.  I have a camper shell on my truck and the glass of the rear window is close to the frame for the wrap around on the throttle side.  At first, I was concerned about possible contact when traveling over rough roads but after 3 years it has never been an issue.  The bike is very stable on the rack, whether crawling over heavily rutted roads in 4WD or blasting down the highway.  With experience, you can load and unload in a matter of minutes.  Love the rack!  The rack I purchased was offered at a 25% discount as it had a "flaw" in the paint job.  

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After borrowing a couple of hitch racks to try them out and watching other riders load and unload their bikes I bought a MotoTote.  It is one of the toughest racks I have come across. It is easy to load, holds the bike securely, and offers good clearance for traveling rutted out forest roads.  I have a camper shell on my truck and the glass of the rear window is close to the frame for the wrap around on the throttle side.  At first, I was concerned about possible contact when traveling over rough roads but after 3 years it has never been an issue.  The bike is very stable on the rack, whether crawling over heavily rutted roads in 4WD or blasting down the highway.  With experience, you can load and unload in a matter of minutes.  Love the rack!  The rack I purchased was offered at a 25% discount as it had a "flaw" in the paint job.  


Hmmm.

IMG_2765.JPG

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Here's a unit we've been testing by an Australian mfr called Rack N Ride.  So far so good and it has a 5 year structural warranty. They are distributing them out of Los Angeles. We'll be posting a full review as the miles stack up. Checkout the list of configuration options they offer from longer ramps to the height of the carrier depending upon your clearance needs. We like the hi vis orange, but you can get in black too.

@Freemotion

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Posted (edited)
On 3/12/2019 at 2:20 PM, Tahoe Gator said:

 


Hmmm.

IMG_2765.JPG

 

Thanks for forwarding the note that someone had some trouble.  A full inspection is due before I load it up again.  I took a quick look at my unit today, it's raining like crazy right now, and the piece that holds the front wheel is pretty beefy. It is not a piece I would be suspect of.  I will try and post some results of the inspection for those who care to follow along.

Next day edit;

Looked at the Mototote at length today.  The design of how the front wheel is captured is as, or more robust, than the rest of this rack and probably any other rack.  The "shoe" where the wheel rides is a trough formed from 1/16" steel sheet with 1/8 inch steel reinforcement. The shoe is attached to the rack with 3 each, 3/8" Grade 8 bolts.  The crossbar is 1 1/2 inch dia x 1/8 wall tubing.  The shoe is assembled to the rack in a sandwich so the tension on the tie-down straps works to keep all the pieces in place in place.  It could be possible to have the bike ride on the rack without the bolts and just use the straps.  I don't know what happened to Victor with the Amazon post but the pieces don't add up to match his story. My recommendation is to buy a Mototote with confidence.  If you have any concerns with the design they use you should have the same concerns with all the other racks on the market.  Hope this helps anyone who is on the fence.

Edited by arc2arc
Update after inspection of parts

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On 2/17/2019 at 1:43 PM, Tahoe Gator said:

If your vehicle has a roof rack, consider fabricating a bar that connects to the roof rack and can be attached to the bike at/near the bars/stem. Massively reduces tip risk and makes the strap on / strap off process super easy as it holds the bike vertically for you.

 

IMG_2545.JPG

 

https://thumpertalk.com/applications/tapatalk/index.php?/topic/1250632-Hitch-Carrier%3A-under-frame-vs%2E-under-the-wheels%3F/page__view__findpost__p__14260070

 

Hmmmm. I have some concern about a roof rack and it being push forward and pulled aft. Not once or twice, but over time (cycles). Roof racks are more designed for weight pushing down vs. pulling or pushing front to back. At least that's what I'm thinking. I've logged 10s of 1,000s on my carrier with friction straps without a single issue. Well, one... the dumbass in the RV that pulled into a gas station and clipped my carrier with the bike loaded. Bike was BRAND NEW, ZERO MILES. Luckily the front tire took all of the flex and it didn't damage the bike. I wanted to strangle the dude!

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Hmmmm. I have some concern about a roof rack and it being push forward and pulled aft. Not once or twice, but over time (cycles). Roof racks are more designed for weight pushing down vs. pulling or pushing front to back. At least that's what I'm thinking. I've logged 10s of 1,000s on my carrier with friction straps without a single issue. Well, one... the dumbass in the RV that pulled into a gas station and clipped my carrier with the bike loaded. Bike was BRAND NEW, ZERO MILES. Luckily the front tire took all of the flex and it didn't damage the bike. I wanted to strangle the dude!

 

There is no load on that bar during regular operation. In fact, the strap attaching it to the bars/headset has some slack in it. It only would come into play if there was a problem with the straps securing the bike to the hitch trailer. So it is a “backup” system.

 

I will say this: it is handy when unloading as I can remove all the straps and it keeps the bike from tipping over without me having to lean it against the windshield. I guess in that case it has some load but it is a trivial amount.

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1 minute ago, Tahoe Gator said:

 


There is no load on that bar during regular operation. In fact, the strap attaching it to the bars/headset has some slack in it. It only would come into play if there was a problem with the straps securing the bike to the hitch trailer. It’s also handy when unloading as I can remove all the straps and it keeps the bike from tipping over without me having to lean it against the windshield. I guess in that case it has some load but it is a trivial amount.

 

Im talking about acceleration and braking, especially harder, unexpected stops and those cycles over time. Would hate to potentially distort the roof of my vehicle. Might not happen, but something I thought about.

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Under acceleration or braking, my bike does not move from vertical. Certainly it moves less than the slack in the supporting bar.

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Under acceleration or braking, my bike does not move from vertical. Certainly it moves less than the slack in the supporting bar. I’m just neurotic in not wanting to drag my bike down the street if something goes wrong.


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