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carterkendall

hitch carriers, the good, the bad, the ugly

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It may not be moving.  But it may be trying to move which puts stress on the roof. I think that is what BB is referring to.

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It may not be moving.  But it may be trying to move which puts stress on the roof. I think that is what BB is referring to.


Nope. More slack than the movement. 100% sure on that. But I am also not so leery as my rack is not made of balsa wood. It’s a Yakima rack that regular carries a hundred plus pounds of kiteboarding gear in one or sometimes two roof carrier boxes and say what you want about downward force vs horizontal force, that much gear in travel boxes has plenty of horizontal force when I jam on the brakes,
so I am not worried about a bar connected to the upper portion of my bike when the wheels are anchored at the bottom. That said, pretty simple to not copy me. But I won’t be one of those “dragged my bike for a mile” stories.
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11 hours ago, Tahoe Gator said:

 


Nope. More slack than the movement. 100% sure on that. But I am also not so leery as my rack is not made of balsa wood. It’s a Yakima rack that regular carries a hundred plus pounds of kiteboarding gear in one or sometimes two roof carrier boxes and say what you want about downward force vs horizontal force, that much gear in travel boxes has plenty of horizontal force when I jam on the brakes,
so I am not worried about a bar connected to the upper portion of my bike when the wheels are anchored at the bottom. That said, pretty simple to not copy me. But I won’t be one of those “dragged my bike for a mile” stories.

 

Glad it's working for you.:thumbsup:

Me, I've logged 10s of thousand of miles on my carrier with two friction straps up front and one ratchet strap over the rear tire. 85 on the free, way, pot hole filled back roads, washboard dirt roads, etc... I even carried a 500lbs adv bike on it from Chattanooga TN to Tampa FL w/ zero issues. Always use quality straps in good condition, I tie it down carefully, including knots at the buckles so then can't loosen. Straps with spring loaded clips so they can't come off. Brand is now disco'd but rock solid after many years. Def. overbuilt, but light out of aluminum. Not sure how dragging bikes are happening honestly. I've had a few panic stops and no handlebar end through the back window. No sway either. The hitch pin is a graded bolt with a sleeve welded partially over the length of the threads. The hole in the stinger tube is smaller on one side, so when you tighten down the nut on the threads it sucks the sleeve into the inner wall of the stinger tube. This take up all the play. Simple but effective design.

Not mine, but same unit (Sarge Carrier). The backbone of the carrier is a single piece of thick wall rectangular boxed aluminum.

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Bryan - Is there any way you could take a pic of that pin.  The drawing you provided doesn't show enough detail.

 

No hurry though.

 

Thanks !

:cheers:

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21 hours ago, Center Punch said:

Bryan - Is there any way you could take a pic of that pin.  The drawing you provided doesn't show enough detail.

 

No hurry though.

 

Thanks !

:cheers:

Yep, it's OLD. Still works like a champ. You could even put a nylon locking nut or lock washer on, but I've just cranked it down well. The hole in the stinger on one side is just big enough for the sleeve to slide through but the other hole is just big enough for the threads to go through and stick out the other side of the receiver hitch.  When you tighten the stinger is sucked tightly up against the receiver tube. All the flex is the actual aluminum carrier it self. There is no play between the stinger and the receiver.

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Thanks Bryan.

I guess I'm not seeing how that pin isn't held in place on the opposite side of the nut .

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25 minutes ago, Center Punch said:

Thanks Bryan.

I guess I'm not seeing how that pin isn't held in place on the opposite side of the nut .

The pin assembly is held in place by the nut & washer on the OUTSIDE of the receiver and the exposed lip of the sleeve on the INSIDE of the stinger tube. The clamping force is NOT only on the outside of the receiver hitch. That design allows the stinger tube to float side to side on the pin.

Maybe this will help:

 

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Good explanation of your method ^^

On my reciever I use a bolt and two pieces of L-shaped strap to sandwich the receiver hitch.  Seems to work ok but I don't have anything else to compare to.

(excuse the no graphic naked bike pics)   Here the bike is mounted w/o the two straps test fitting the UMX after I got it lst year, without the support straps.  No recent pics of it ready to roll.  Grab some later.

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That hauler seems like a lot of work.  I use a ramp type that also Inserts into the hitch.  It's all aluminum.  It's ramp is a little short, by a foot. I forget the company's name, sorry.  But I am only pushing a mini bike up it.

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Posted (edited)
On 3/17/2019 at 3:41 AM, slip57 said:

That hauler seems like a lot of work.  I use a ramp type that also Inserts into the hitch.  It's all aluminum.  It's ramp is a little short, by a foot. I forget the company's name, sorry.  But I am only pushing a mini bike up it.

For me, the UMX is less work.

I used an aluminum ramp type when I first bought the bike to bring it home (bought quick at Northern Tool).  Thing is, I only have use of one arm and I'm 5'3" (not a lot of leverage).  Rolling the bike up the steep ramp (placed at ground level) was tough to push the bike up by myself and stay balanced and then hold it overhead.  Same with unloading.  The task was physically difficult.

With the UMX, I don't have to deal with the task of balancing the bike when un/loading up a ramp overhead.  The hardest thing I do is lift the bike the 2" to put it on the platform.  All the other steps involved with it are physically easy to do with one arm. 

It all depends on the user.  For me, the UMX is less work.

Edited by Monica
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28 minutes ago, Monica said:

I only have use of one arm and I'm 5'3" (not a lot of leverage).

Texas ladies are the HEAT! Improvise, adapt, overcome!

 

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4 hours ago, LSHD said:

Texas ladies are the HEAT! Improvise, adapt, overcome!

 

That's right, don't quit 'til you're dead  😉

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I use a blue ox hauler that I picked up second hand as they are uber expensive (around $800-1000) and its great. Thing is heavy as an ox weighing in at around 130lbs but I know it is gonna hold my bike without any problems as its rated up to 600lbs or so. I also made a rendition of the blue ox hitch immobilizer as I could do that for about $6 rather than paying $60 and there is no vertical or side slop in my hauler now. 

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Here's a unit we've been testing by an Australian mfr called Rack N Ride.  So far so good and it has a 5 year structural warranty. They are distributing them out of Los Angeles. We'll be posting a full review as the miles stack up. Checkout the list of configuration options they offer from longer ramps to the height of the carrier depending upon your clearance needs. We like the hi vis orange, but you can get in black too.
[mention=503218]Freemotion[/mention]


Needs to grab the pegs like the Risk Racing clamps do, for those of us with Pivot Pegz.

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I love my UMX.  I don't have any of the issues others have described but I have done some setup to avoid pitfalls.  It's important to: use a skid plate which is perfectly flat on the bottom, determine which footpeg hole balances the bike best and use it for the cross pins/bolts, strap the bar down to the loop, ensure your stabilizer pin is tight, and assemble the carrier pivot points to the point where they no longer move then turn the nuts out about 1/4 turn or when then start to move again with slight resistance.  It's ok if the platform does not lower without a bike or you standing on it, it's designed to lower with the weight of the machine not the weight of the platform alone.  I have used the rail haulers in the past and they all suffer from excessive sway, bulky to store, placing compression on the suspension, the bike will be a total loss in the event of a strap failure, and you drag them constantly on bumps/driveways/etc.  I also purchased a dedicated motorcycle mover with air ride rear suspension which makes life a lot easier than dealing with sagging suspension when loaded and sway on the highway.

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Edited by Zuminazx
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I have zero sway in my rail carrier thanks to the $5 immobilizer I fabbed up, have never drug it across the ground but my 4Runner also has a slight lift on it, and put close to no stress on my suspension thanks to a heavy duty fork saver, mine will also not fall in the event of a single strap failure because I use 3 in total.. I’ve seen what strapping a bike down by the pegs does to the longevity of the pegs, springs, and pins. I’ve had a 15 year old bike that had zero slop in the pegs from being strapped from the handlebars/swing arm and a 7 year old bike that felt like the pegs are going to fall off after being strapped down by the pegs constantly. It’s all semantics on which is better, it honestly is gonna come down to what you get the best deal on and preference IMO. 

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18 hours ago, Piney Woods said:

No reason for a rail type carrier to drag anymore than a jack type. 

The UMX's hitch tube only protrudes from the receiver about 8", your typical ramp style is 3-4 times that amount.  

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On 3/20/2019 at 7:49 PM, Piney Woods said:

No reason for a rail type carrier to drag anymore than a jack type. 

Actually, yes.  If you get a chance, look up the term 'departure angle'.  Generally an important factor in rock crawling vehicles and the like.  The principle will apply here.

Edited by Monica
rephrasing

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Anyone of sound  mine can find hitch attachments that slide in the receiver and lower or raise the height of anything attached. Any bus selling/mfg hitch equipment has them in many different measurements. $35-$50 typically.

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