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Why does Feld has FIM instead of the AMA drug testing..SMH

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Remember Cade Clason? The privateer rider that tested positive for an amphetamine near the end of last year’s Monster Energy AMA Supercross? By the time the test results came out, Clason was contesting the Canadian Nationals, and was able to continue racing. But what about supercross in 2018? Well, there’s not much to report on his status and as of now, Cade’s not planning on racing anywhere in 2018 and cannot, even four months later, find out when he’s allowed to earn a living in the sport he’s been working in for nearly his entire life.

There’s no question that our sport needs drug testing; anyone who thinks otherwise is living in a distorted reality. There’s millions of dollars at stake for the top riders in a sport that’s incredibly hard and physically demanding. Having an advantage in strength or endurance or recovery (or all three) is huge and if we didn’t have someone watching our athletes, who knows what would be going on. Drug testing is a good thing, no doubt about it. Let’s get that straight. 

But like a lot of things, we just can’t seem to get this right. Monster Energy Supercross is sanctioned by the FIM, which uses WADA (World Anti-Drug Administration) while the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship is sanctioned by AMA Pro Racing and uses USADA (United States Anti-Drug Administration). USADA falls under the WADA umbrella and both are set up to test and monitor athletes. They also punish athletes in a matter built around the Olympics: a first offense can cost you four years, or one full Olympic cycle. 

James Stewart was removed from racing for a year and a half after testing positive for Adderall (the same substance that Clason tested positive for) and to some that was the equivalent of killing a mosquito with a shotgun. Stewart’s exact situation of filling out a TUE (Therapeutic Use Exemption) is unclear, while Clason, it appears, did everything by the book—to a point. He was diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed Adderall, then tried to do the right thing and send his TUE to the Switzerland-based FIM.

Clason was still able to race the Canadian Nationals this past summer.James Lissimore

“Basically when I started taking (Adderall) I got all the forms online for the TUE,” explains Clason.  “I took them to my doctor. The doctor filled them out, and I submitted them to the FIM. I just scanned and emailed it to them, which is how it said to do it. I got a notice back and it said it (the TUE) wasn’t correct and that I had to do it again. So I went back, had them do it again the way they said to, and I sent it back to them. Then I never heard anything from them.” 

Here’s where the trouble happens. Unlike the first time, when WADA told Clason he had not filled the forms out correctly, Clason never heard back when he submitted the form the second time. So Clason figured everything was filled out correctly and went about racing the 2017 Monster Energy AMA Supercross season. Then he was chosen for a random drug test at the East Rutherford SX and Clason happily went in and took the test. 

“It’s funny because I was kind of stressing because a few days before [the race] I had had a wisdom tooth pulled and then I was on some antibiotics because it got infected,” he explains. “I was like, We’re two races from the end of the year. I’m not submitting paperwork for this stuff. I don’t even think I need to… Then I got drug tested and literally on my way home from that race I drove straight to the dentist and I was like, ‘Can any of this stuff get me in trouble?’ He’s like, ‘No. An antibiotic is perfectly fine for any type of sport,’ and that’s all I was on, so I was like, ‘Okay, cool. It is what it is.” 

Then around mid-July, Clason received a letter indicating he had been provisionally suspended. He went into full panic mode, sending emails and calling the FIM. He got no response. Two days later the press release went out and his life has not been the same since.

So what about that revised TUE Clason had sent in? Well, when he finally tracked someone down at the FIM, “They acknowledged that they have it, that it just was never processed correctly. The forms still weren’t right.” 

Clason, a privateer, lacks the thousands of dollars needed to hire lawyers and appeal his case over in Switzerland. He’s been in limbo with very limited interaction with the sanctioning body that punished him. To add to his problems, in one of the communiqué’s the FIM mentioned that since Stewart’s penalty the rules have changed and Clason can be suspended for four years—an “Olympic” penalty. At 22 years old, his peak earning years may be over before they even begin. And all because no one communicated any problems with his revised paperwork nor did they tell him he had passed/failed the approval process.

Recommended Reading

Cade Clason Provisionally Suspended for FIM Anti-doping Violation [Update]June 21, 2017

Yoshimura Suzuki Statement on James StewartDecember 17, 2014

“Right now we’re going back and getting stuff from a doctor when I was younger just to prove that I was taking it when I was younger,” says Clason. “They (the FIM) said that could help the fact to lower the suspension. It’s not a guarantee but it’s a possibility. So, we’re working on that and trying to figure that out. “ 

This sport is growing. The numbers of TV viewers are up and over and over I’m told by people in positions of importance that the sport is stealing some of the disengaged NASCAR fans as we try—a little too obviously, in my opinion—to grab some of that crowd. But, if we’re trying to be a little more NASCAR-like, why not follow the stock car association’s lead and do our own testing with appropriate penalties and not ones that are better suited for the four-year cycle that Olympic athletes face? Sure, we have a bit of an alphabet soup governing the sport right now, between two sanctioning bodies for supercross (AMA and FIM) and a third (AMA Pro Racing) for outdoors, but surely they could work together to maybe form a drug-testing and punishing regimen that makes more sense for motorsports’ athletes than it does track-and-field athletes. Because WADA and USADA seem to be inflexible and way too harsh for our athletes and sport. A runner or long-jumper or Tour de France cyclist taking PEDs is one thing—it’s true that in those sports, suspending someone for a few events, a few months of even a year may not be detrimental enough. For a dirt bike rider who races in a championship that pays points each week, it would be. Not to mention that we’re discussing an athlete with ADHD taking prescribed medication—not full-on steroids here. 

Clason is trying to see the bright side. “Everybody in the U.S. has been so helpful and trying to guide me in the right direction, but as far as the guys overseas, that’s where the lack of communication comes in,” he says. “Obviously, nobody answers phone calls. They don’t return emails. It’s not like I send an email and in a day or two I get a response. I send an email and like a month later they finally get back to me.” 

Think about how frustrating it must be for an athlete trying to be proactive in his career. For the record, Clason 100 percent believes that he should be punished for not following up and making sure his second submitted TUE was approved but right now. But now he’s facing a four-year suspension for something that his doctor prescribed, that WADA acknowledges he submitted two forms for, and has been exempted for more than a couple of his fellow racers. Pardon the pun, but it’s all a bitter pill to swallow.

“I’d love to just try and get it straightened out with them. If I get suspended, maybe that’s the way it is."James Lissimore

Last week Clason underwent shoulder surgery to fix a lingering issue, while also facing the daunting question if he’s even allowed to race anywhere in 2018. He’s worked something out with his 2017 gear sponsor FXR to do some rider support and preparing to take some online business courses to better himself, but the rest if truly up in the air. 

“FXR basically offered me a part-time job to go to a lot of the supercrosses, a couple of outdoors and a bunch of big amateur events basically to just help out the riders,” he says. “(They want me to) basically be like a rider support guy but with less to do. I’m cool with that. I think it will be really fun to get to go to the races and get to help out my friends and just get to be at the races.” 

As for Cade Clason as an actual racer, the wait continues and his career hangs in the balance with some apparently hard-to-reach folks in Switzerland that don’t seem to be deeply concerned with letting one young American know exactly what he’s done wrong, what he can do to fix the problem, and when he can get back to racing his dirt bike for a living. Facing four years, Clason knows that this could be it for him.

“I’d love to just try and get it straightened out with them. If I get suspended, maybe that’s the way it is,” says Clason. “I’ve kind of accepted the fact that I’m going to get suspended. I understand that I messed up with the paperwork and stuff, but in no way do I think I deserve to be suspended for four years.” 

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The AMA is a puppet organization in SX, the FIM is the real sanctioning body, and the FIM signed on with WADA.

For outdoor MX, AMA Pro Racing signed on with USADA, but they are also just a puppet arm of WADA, so WADA rules the roost there as well.

The NFL was smart enough to keep all of that stuff in house under their own control, they weren’t dumb enough to sign on with WADA.  

Edited by redrider144
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I think drug testing is complex and expensive , I can understand why anyone would farm it out

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4 minutes ago, mog said:

I think drug testing is complex and expensive , I can understand why anyone would farm it out

But you farm out control along with the testing, and remember where WADA gets most of their funding from?  The IOC.  Follow the $$$.  They protect their Olympic baby and in turn take out their wrath on racing that has no affiliation to the Olympics.

http://www.vocativ.com/348150/ex-wada-investigator-alleges-further-olympic-corruption-in-russian-doping-program/index.html

Edited by redrider144
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Sounds as if Clason followed procedure and protocol and got the shaft anyway. Convenient they go to the olympic standard of a 4 year suspension. No offense to those who work their ass off to be in the olympics, but what a scam. Nearly every city that "wins" the right to hold the olympics loses tons of money, venues get abandoned. I'm still pissed Feld shut down ringling bros so they'll never be in my good books, and this just solidifies my position.

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But you farm out control along with the testing, and remember where WADA gets most of their funding from?  The IOC.  Follow the $$$.  They protect their Olympic baby and in turn take out their wrath on racing that has no affiliation to the Olympics.
http://www.vocativ.com/348150/ex-wada-investigator-alleges-further-olympic-corruption-in-russian-doping-program/index.html

You always lose control as you sub contract things , but you also get rid of hassle , drug testing is such a evolving science how could anyone keep on top ? I'm not saying it's good , Stewart got what he deserved imo ,this case sounds different but still I think I would have checked .....
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Personally I think they should just drop drug testing unless they can come up with a fair and sensible approach. Those that use the "banned" drugs as a true medicine seem to be penalized by blanket bans that don't take into account the amount of the drug found in one's system. I can tell you from personal experience of a father whose son has been taking retalin since he was 6 years old and is now 33, racing while not taking the medicine is very dangerous for him. His inability to concentrate leads to too many mistakes that can be disasterous. I'm actually glad he has retired from racing.

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This was hashed out earlier in the year on here and I remember someone saying they all go back to the motorhome/hauler whatever and get straight on an IV btwn motos. It's all about staying one step ahead, finding what they don't test for, or how to mask what they do. 

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I would be so pissed, he tried his best to follow procedure and gets shafted for no reason. &%$#@! that shit. 

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3 hours ago, HansLanda said:

I would be so pissed, he tried his best to follow procedure and gets shafted for no reason. &%$#@! that shit. 

Well there is always a lot of "my dog ate my homework" and excuses in this stuff by those who get caught as well. Sure there are some innocent people in prison but 99% of them committed what they got convicted for and probably worse and 99% of them will claim they didn't do it.

The testing bodies have problems I agree, but for the most part those who get caught were doing something they weren't supposed to and they got busted for that, not for no reason. 

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This is where the AMA/MXsports/Coombs should step in and help this kid out.  But since there is nothing in it for them they will just watch the kid sink without throwing him a life preserver. 

In the end this kid should move on  and be the local Pro Am hot shot and race  money moto's.   This sport has nothing to offer a privateer.  

Edited by RMZ819
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I don't think they could have any influence, wada probably don't know they exist

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17 hours ago, portlandcsc said:

Remember Cade Clason? The privateer rider that tested positive for an amphetamine near the end of last year’s Monster Energy AMA Supercross? By the time the test results came out, Clason was contesting the Canadian Nationals, and was able to continue racing. But what about supercross in 2018? Well, there’s not much to report on his status and as of now, Cade’s not planning on racing anywhere in 2018 and cannot, even four months later, find out when he’s allowed to earn a living in the sport he’s been working in for nearly his entire life.

There’s no question that our sport needs drug testing; anyone who thinks otherwise is living in a distorted reality. There’s millions of dollars at stake for the top riders in a sport that’s incredibly hard and physically demanding. Having an advantage in strength or endurance or recovery (or all three) is huge and if we didn’t have someone watching our athletes, who knows what would be going on. Drug testing is a good thing, no doubt about it. Let’s get that straight. 

But like a lot of things, we just can’t seem to get this right. Monster Energy Supercross is sanctioned by the FIM, which uses WADA (World Anti-Drug Administration) while the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship is sanctioned by AMA Pro Racing and uses USADA (United States Anti-Drug Administration). USADA falls under the WADA umbrella and both are set up to test and monitor athletes. They also punish athletes in a matter built around the Olympics: a first offense can cost you four years, or one full Olympic cycle. 

James Stewart was removed from racing for a year and a half after testing positive for Adderall (the same substance that Clason tested positive for) and to some that was the equivalent of killing a mosquito with a shotgun. Stewart’s exact situation of filling out a TUE (Therapeutic Use Exemption) is unclear, while Clason, it appears, did everything by the book—to a point. He was diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed Adderall, then tried to do the right thing and send his TUE to the Switzerland-based FIM.

Clason was still able to race the Canadian Nationals this past summer.James Lissimore

“Basically when I started taking (Adderall) I got all the forms online for the TUE,” explains Clason.  “I took them to my doctor. The doctor filled them out, and I submitted them to the FIM. I just scanned and emailed it to them, which is how it said to do it. I got a notice back and it said it (the TUE) wasn’t correct and that I had to do it again. So I went back, had them do it again the way they said to, and I sent it back to them. Then I never heard anything from them.” 

Here’s where the trouble happens. Unlike the first time, when WADA told Clason he had not filled the forms out correctly, Clason never heard back when he submitted the form the second time. So Clason figured everything was filled out correctly and went about racing the 2017 Monster Energy AMA Supercross season. Then he was chosen for a random drug test at the East Rutherford SX and Clason happily went in and took the test. 

“It’s funny because I was kind of stressing because a few days before [the race] I had had a wisdom tooth pulled and then I was on some antibiotics because it got infected,” he explains. “I was like, We’re two races from the end of the year. I’m not submitting paperwork for this stuff. I don’t even think I need to… Then I got drug tested and literally on my way home from that race I drove straight to the dentist and I was like, ‘Can any of this stuff get me in trouble?’ He’s like, ‘No. An antibiotic is perfectly fine for any type of sport,’ and that’s all I was on, so I was like, ‘Okay, cool. It is what it is.” 

Then around mid-July, Clason received a letter indicating he had been provisionally suspended. He went into full panic mode, sending emails and calling the FIM. He got no response. Two days later the press release went out and his life has not been the same since.

So what about that revised TUE Clason had sent in? Well, when he finally tracked someone down at the FIM, “They acknowledged that they have it, that it just was never processed correctly. The forms still weren’t right.” 

Clason, a privateer, lacks the thousands of dollars needed to hire lawyers and appeal his case over in Switzerland. He’s been in limbo with very limited interaction with the sanctioning body that punished him. To add to his problems, in one of the communiqué’s the FIM mentioned that since Stewart’s penalty the rules have changed and Clason can be suspended for four years—an “Olympic” penalty. At 22 years old, his peak earning years may be over before they even begin. And all because no one communicated any problems with his revised paperwork nor did they tell him he had passed/failed the approval process.

Recommended Reading

Cade Clason Provisionally Suspended for FIM Anti-doping Violation [Update]June 21, 2017

Yoshimura Suzuki Statement on James StewartDecember 17, 2014

“Right now we’re going back and getting stuff from a doctor when I was younger just to prove that I was taking it when I was younger,” says Clason. “They (the FIM) said that could help the fact to lower the suspension. It’s not a guarantee but it’s a possibility. So, we’re working on that and trying to figure that out. “ 

This sport is growing. The numbers of TV viewers are up and over and over I’m told by people in positions of importance that the sport is stealing some of the disengaged NASCAR fans as we try—a little too obviously, in my opinion—to grab some of that crowd. But, if we’re trying to be a little more NASCAR-like, why not follow the stock car association’s lead and do our own testing with appropriate penalties and not ones that are better suited for the four-year cycle that Olympic athletes face? Sure, we have a bit of an alphabet soup governing the sport right now, between two sanctioning bodies for supercross (AMA and FIM) and a third (AMA Pro Racing) for outdoors, but surely they could work together to maybe form a drug-testing and punishing regimen that makes more sense for motorsports’ athletes than it does track-and-field athletes. Because WADA and USADA seem to be inflexible and way too harsh for our athletes and sport. A runner or long-jumper or Tour de France cyclist taking PEDs is one thing—it’s true that in those sports, suspending someone for a few events, a few months of even a year may not be detrimental enough. For a dirt bike rider who races in a championship that pays points each week, it would be. Not to mention that we’re discussing an athlete with ADHD taking prescribed medication—not full-on steroids here. 

Clason is trying to see the bright side. “Everybody in the U.S. has been so helpful and trying to guide me in the right direction, but as far as the guys overseas, that’s where the lack of communication comes in,” he says. “Obviously, nobody answers phone calls. They don’t return emails. It’s not like I send an email and in a day or two I get a response. I send an email and like a month later they finally get back to me.” 

Think about how frustrating it must be for an athlete trying to be proactive in his career. For the record, Clason 100 percent believes that he should be punished for not following up and making sure his second submitted TUE was approved but right now. But now he’s facing a four-year suspension for something that his doctor prescribed, that WADA acknowledges he submitted two forms for, and has been exempted for more than a couple of his fellow racers. Pardon the pun, but it’s all a bitter pill to swallow.

“I’d love to just try and get it straightened out with them. If I get suspended, maybe that’s the way it is."James Lissimore

Last week Clason underwent shoulder surgery to fix a lingering issue, while also facing the daunting question if he’s even allowed to race anywhere in 2018. He’s worked something out with his 2017 gear sponsor FXR to do some rider support and preparing to take some online business courses to better himself, but the rest if truly up in the air. 

“FXR basically offered me a part-time job to go to a lot of the supercrosses, a couple of outdoors and a bunch of big amateur events basically to just help out the riders,” he says. “(They want me to) basically be like a rider support guy but with less to do. I’m cool with that. I think it will be really fun to get to go to the races and get to help out my friends and just get to be at the races.” 

As for Cade Clason as an actual racer, the wait continues and his career hangs in the balance with some apparently hard-to-reach folks in Switzerland that don’t seem to be deeply concerned with letting one young American know exactly what he’s done wrong, what he can do to fix the problem, and when he can get back to racing his dirt bike for a living. Facing four years, Clason knows that this could be it for him.

“I’d love to just try and get it straightened out with them. If I get suspended, maybe that’s the way it is,” says Clason. “I’ve kind of accepted the fact that I’m going to get suspended. I understand that I messed up with the paperwork and stuff, but in no way do I think I deserve to be suspended for four years.” 

According to this story the FIM handled this very unprofessional! 

As this sport is slowly dying noone seems to care  

motocross racers should have rights as they hold a primary part in this sport

guilty till you prove your innocence, right? Isn't that how it works.  

is motocross a sport or just a money making factory for a small group of people, AMA,FIM.    

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If you were a talented rider with a possible future in the sport and it was all taken away by some forgen power, especially one that handled your case this way,how would you feel?

The letter of the law can overdo it especially in the hands of those who really have no care. The spirit of the law takes a look at the big picture so things like this dont crush the society the law is suposed to protect.

Our country has the power and money and knowladge to do drug testing. We dont need some forgen agency lording anything over us and we better start taking charge in such matters or we will sell our birthright .

Yes I get it. This is a "small" matter on the world stage. BUT it also indicative of the way many things in our society are headed. Given time these thigs will only grow unless there is enough resistance. Unfortunatly the farther we allow such things to go unchecked, the more painful it will be to fix it. 

Edited by lowmass
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47 minutes ago, lowmass said:

If you were a talented rider with a possible future in the sport and it was all taken away by some forgen power, especially one that handled your case this way,how would you feel?

The letter of the law can overdo it especially in the hands of those who really have no care. The spirit of the law takes a look at the big picture so things like this dont crush the society the law is suposed to protect.

Our country has the power and money and knowladge to do drug testing. We dont need some forgen agency lording anything over us and we better start taking charge in such matters or we will sell our birthright .

Yes I get it. This is a "small" matter on the world stage. BUT it also indicative of the way many things in our society are headed. Given time these thigs will only grow unless there is enough resistance. Unfortunatly the farther we allow such things to go unchecked, the more painful it will be to fix it. 

I'd take it to court honestly. Over adderall? Or an anti biotic from the dentist? Really? I'd sue them and say so you can't get any normal drug for a normal dental work or take ADHD med's? That's illegal? That is a terrible joke and should not be able to ruin someone's career and they should be going for real drugs. 

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It’s not like Stewart who didn’t even try to follow the rules this kid did what he was suppose to sure he could have followed up but it sounds like they wouldn’t have gotten back anyeays

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Yea he is shrude to not say anything negative at this point but I suspect taking them to court has crossed his mind.

The problem is he cannot afford justice. It will cost much money,even  more time, and huge life stress. All for absolutly no garontee of sucsess even if he "has a good case".

 

 

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2 hours ago, Brad04 said:

That is a terrible joke and should not be able to ruin someone's career and they should be going for real drugs. 

So you think testing for performance enhancing drugs in sports is bad but testing for recreational drugs is good and should be enforced?

Funny, I feel the opposite way. To me, getting stoned on your couch is fine but drug enhanced cheaters in professional sports should be stoned by their competitors(that don't cheat) and then get banned for life. Cheaters deserve to flip burgers.

 

Edited by indy rider
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3 hours ago, mog said:

I don't think they could have any influence, wada probably don't know they exist

WADA takes out their full aggression on racing since it has no relation to the Olympics.  

Edited by redrider144
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