DIY Bearing Puller for under $1

So I'm rebuilding the bottom end on my CRF250R 2010.  All of the bearings on the case had openings on the back sides so I was easily able to just tap them out. 

But on one side of the case there is a bearing on the gears that is closed on the back side.  So you have no access to the back of the bearing to tap it out.  I didn't have a bearing puller (bad enought I had to spend $30 on the flywheel puller that took about 10 seconds to use before going back in the toolbox to hopefully never be used again) but I've used this method before for swingarm bearings and a few other bearings.  I'm using a Shield Anchor.  It's a concrete anchor for construction.  I insert it through a socket and in the bearing.  Tighten the anchor and then tap the bottom of the socket.  Wholla!  Bearing out in a minute.  No case damage, just a cut on my finger. 

The first pic below shows the bearing puller installed.  You can see after a few taps the bearing is coming out.

The second pic shows using an open end wrench to tab the socket up.  The vice grips are used to cancel the vibration in my hand.  The rags on the engine casing are to keep the wrench from contacting the gasket surface edge of the case.  You are tapping away from the case so you should make any contact with the wrench and case anyway. The rag is just precaution.

The third pic shows the bearing out.

The fourth pic is a close up of the shield anchor and the last is a pic of what they look like.

These have saved me numerous times. Just thought I'd share with you guys.  I've used this one bolt a lot and it's held up over time.  It might be a good idea to keep a few sizes of these in the tool box. 

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, BJV said:

So I'm rebuilding the bottom end on my CRF250R 2010.  All of the bearings on the case had openings on the back sides so I was easily able to just tap them out. 

But on one side of the case there is a bearing on the gears that is closed on the back side.  So you have no access to the back of the bearing to tap it out.  I didn't have a bearing puller (bad enought I had to spend $30 on the flywheel puller that took about 10 seconds to use before going back in the toolbox to hopefully never be used again) but I've used this method before for swingarm bearings and a few other bearings.  I'm using a Shield Anchor.  It's a concrete anchor for construction.  I insert it through a socket and in the bearing.  Tighten the anchor and then tap the bottom of the socket.  Wholla!  Bearing out in a minute.  No case damage, just a cut on my finger. 

The first pic below shows the bearing puller installed.  You can see after a few taps the bearing is coming out.

The second pic shows using an open end wrench to tab the socket up.  The vice grips are used to cancel the vibration in my hand.  The rags on the engine casing are to keep the wrench from contacting the gasket surface edge of the case.  You are tapping away from the case so you should make any contact with the wrench and case anyway. The rag is just precaution.

The third pic shows the bearing out.

The fourth pic is a close up of the shield anchor and the last is a pic of what they look like.

These have saved me numerous times. Just thought I'd share with you guys.  I've used this one bolt a lot and it's held up over time.  It might be a good idea to keep a few sizes of these in the tool box. 

 

 

 

IMG_7589.JPG

IMG_7594.JPG

IMG_7596.JPG

IMG_7597.JPG

bolt-and-shield-anchor-250x250.jpg

Great idea....  Thanks for the tip.

Ya I used an expandable concrete anchor I got for a few $$$ to do the blind bearings in my lower linkage on my 05 crf250R.

This expands inside the bearing then you can tap it out (might need some heat) Not a great pic but might help someone doing blind bearings.

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And what I used as a reference :)

 

Edited by filterx

Excellent shade tree tool/method for blind bearing removal. Just a word of caution for the cage in a swingarm and perhaps a ball bearing as well. You want the expander to open behind the bearing/cage if possible and not inside. Also, you want it to expand just enough to hold. What you do not want to happen the is the expansion of the 'tool' to expand the cage/bearing and make it tighter. A step further would be to use a length of 'All Thread' and a slide hammer

Blind bearing tools have a narrow 'lip' on the back side and the tool is the same OD at the bearing/cage ID. So when expanded, the tool is just barely the size of the cage/bearing but the lip fully covers the back side.

Yes good points BUT if you stupidly neglected the swing arm/lower linkage like I did, the bearings fell out and it was all about getting the races out.

Again slightly off topic BUT I've now learned a valuable lesson and will be inspecting/lubing etc the swing arm/lower linkage once a year or max every 2nd years :)

Swing arm was about the same once I got the bolt out :(

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Not a bad tip, but I would NEVER pry using the case as a fulcrum. My suggestions is to make a slide hammer, would be pretty easy to do with that anchor stud.

With all that being said. The Tusk blind bearing removal tool with slide hammer is one of the best tools I've bought.

14 minutes ago, Marcus Robertson said:

Not a bad tip, but I would NEVER pry using the case as a fulcrum. My suggestions is to make a slide hammer, would be pretty easy to do with that anchor stud.

With all that being said. The Tusk blind bearing removal tool with slide hammer is one of the best tools I've bought.

I didn't pry against the case.  The rags were there to just protect the case.  I was tapping the wrench up and away from the case.  It would be bad a very bad idea to use the mating surface of the case as a fulcrum for sure.

1 hour ago, BJV said:

I didn't pry against the case.  The rags were there to just protect the case.  I was tapping the wrench up and away from the case.  It would be bad a very bad idea to use the mating surface of the case as a fulcrum for sure.

LOL, yeah, it took me a minute to realize the socket/wrench/hammering bit.

Most people do not realize that the bearings are typically not in that tight, just tight enough to have more resistance that the races/balls/needles.

Again, congrats for a VERY good tip. I'll try to remember it and share, though forgive me for not giving you the credit (my memory fo names stinks).

OK, if you need THAT size, but what about the other 95% of bearings?

Those anchors come in all different sizes.  My DIY bearing puller set consists of threaded rods, nuts for the rods, various size washers and these anchors.  Using those with sockets I haven't come across a bearing that I can't get out.... well with the exception of the wheel bearing on my 93 Trooper that took a hydraulic press and a few tons of pressure to pop loose.  Below is a pic I've made use of with other bearings.  That pic is from another post here on TT.  It works very well. 

1-20090130CushionLever016-1.jpg&key=d0b5

On 13/11/2017 at 11:40 AM, BJV said:

Those anchors come in all different sizes.  My DIY bearing puller set consists of threaded rods, nuts for the rods, various size washers and these anchors.  Using those with sockets I haven't come across a bearing that I can't get out.... well with the exception of the wheel bearing on my 93 Trooper that took a hydraulic press and a few tons of pressure to pop loose.  Below is a pic I've made use of with other bearings.  That pic is from another post here on TT.  It works very well. 

1-20090130CushionLever016-1.jpg&key=d0b5

Ya I've seen the threaded rod set-up (but not tried) but IMO another cheap easy option that works

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