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MY 2018 Beta 500 RR-S Thread

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I hate the bike up over 55 mph.  It is just not fun at all.  It might be because I was so used to haivng nice big-hyperbikes for high speeds back in the day, but I agree, at over 55 mph with 90/10 knobbies is not where I like being but, the bike is fun rowing through the six gears and accelerating to 60 mph right-quick though.  

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And used it! Or did you chew it up for street cred before you installed it?😂

Also, I have the Tubeless system on my CRF and have it sitting in the garage for my Beta but after this weekend talking to a bunch of pretty serious dualsporters I am not sure I still want to install it.

Here is why, on serious excursions we still need to carry tubes and irons etc, which Im ok with, because I figure at least I wont have to use them for most flats. But, if something like a nail punctures the high pressure tube or the sidewall gets slashed, the tubeless will need to be removed before a regular tube can be installed and on the trail that is supposed to be a tremendous difficulty. Two of the 5 guys I was riding with have seen it happen, and a third agreed with them.

I need to see if I can find a method for removing the tubeless on the trail. 

Apparently there is another method of running tubeless that seals the spokes, but I am concerned about ditching the rim locks.

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29 minutes ago, Go_outside said:

I need to see if I can find a method for removing the tubeless on the trail. 

 

images.jpeg

tubless is good for enduro, but not adventure. for adv riding tubes are the way to go my mann. 

I just run std tubes all the time and carry some patches and the worst pump ever, one of these days I'll upgrade to some Co2's..

Edited by surfer-dude
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17 minutes ago, surfer-dude said:

 

images.jpeg

tubless is good for enduro, but not adventure. for adv riding tubes are the way to go my mann. 

I just run std tubes all the time and carry some patches and the worst pump ever, one of these days I'll upgrade to some Co2's..

I dont trust CO2. Im always afraid I will run out of gas before I fix all my flats. But I guess if I only have one tube and patches dont work anymore...

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And used it! Or did you chew it up for street cred before you installed it?
Also, I have the Tubeless system on my CRF and have it sitting in the garage for my Beta but after this weekend talking to a bunch of pretty serious dualsporters I am not sure I still want to install it.
Here is why, on serious excursions we still need to carry tubes and irons etc, which Im ok with, because I figure at least I wont have to use them for most flats. But, if something like a nail punctures the high pressure tube or the sidewall gets slashed, the tubeless will need to be removed before a regular tube can be installed and on the trail that is supposed to be a tremendous difficulty. Two of the 5 guys I was riding with have seen it happen, and a third agreed with them.
I need to see if I can find a method for removing the tubeless on the trail. 
Apparently there is another method of running tubeless that seals the spokes, but I am concerned about ditching the rim locks.


Tubliss is for low pressures primarily, but I’ve used them on my Beta for 3k miles with no punctures in DS mode. Yet I know a couple of guys that use them surprisingly on adventure mode.

Many including myself insert a few ounces of slime inside the low pressure side of the tubliss so even a cactus needle will not leave ya dealing with a flat tire and even if the low pressure side is totally flat you can still make it home without tearing it down on the trail.

Puncturing the high pressure side of Tubliss is like finding a unicorn on the trail, never heard of it, unless you F it up during installation. As you have the sealing tape to cover ALL spoke nuts, just saying...

For me the option of Tubliss is being able to run low air pressures without spinning the tire and trashing the tube. As super low air pressures afford X-rated traction with many tires today.
I’ve run my Tubliss at zero air pressure low pressure side (100psi high pressure side) last winter for 3 hours.

Yet there are some very good tires out there that offer decent traction off-road in the 14+ psi so tubes can be nice for them, great for DS riding....

Enjoy, but balance your crappy OEM rubber otherwise you may lose some fillings!
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Id like to go tubliss but ive seen some of my pals having issues with the high speed tube and even with slime they still lose air on the low pressure side. Tubes either work or they dont. Im still learning about em. But im very interested in how they allow very low pressure which if you can control your wheelspin would be really cool. Otherwise kind of a pita

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Everything i own with spoked wheels is tubeless except the beta. They all leak a little, a few psi a week or so. I just top them off before riding. Checking tire pressure is something that should be on the pre ride checklist anyway. 

I would rather do that than change a tube out on the trail. 🙂

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51 minutes ago, Go_outside said:

Everything i own with spoked wheels is tubeless except the beta. They all leak a little, a few psi a week or so. I just top them off before riding. Checking tire pressure is something that should be on the pre ride checklist anyway. 

I would rather do that than change a tube out on the trail. 🙂

honestly if I get a flat, Im typically going home. Sometimes I see dudes scrambling working on their bikes trying to make the trail ride, and it can be stressful to watch. I just figure that theres always gonna be a next time. I always go over my bike before a ride, so I know it's gonna work for me ahead of time. But If I have a malfunction, I just chill out and enjoy the scenery or something, and just enjoy being where i'm at. I'm from the inner city and I have too many responsibilities, so every chance out in the boonies is a good time. If I gotta fix a flat so be it, but I'm not gonna stress over it. 

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12 hours ago, Mark-us-B said:

Puncturing the high pressure side of Tubliss is like finding a unicorn on the trail, never heard of it, unless you F it up during installation. As you have the sealing tape to cover ALL spoke nuts, just saying...
 

Damn Unicorn attacked me the first year running Tubliss; one of the trails we ride goes through a former lookout site. When they tear these down quite often they burn a portion of it which leaves hardware on the site; I picked up a six inch nail which made it to the high pressure side didn't notice I had a flat for about three miles. Fortunately one of the riders carries a high pressure bicycle tire pump and was able to patch it and finish out the rest of the ride. I do agree that I lose a little pressure over time and it is just part of the routine to check the pressure in both high and low sides, I no longer use slime but basically drown the tire in soapy water when putting on a new one. Works for me!

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Damn Unicorn attacked me the first year running Tubliss; one of the trails we ride goes through a former lookout site. When they tear these down quite often they burn a portion of it which leaves hardware on the site; I picked up a six inch nail which made it to the high pressure side didn't notice I had a flat for about three miles. Fortunately one of the riders carries a high pressure bicycle tire pump and was able to patch it and finish out the rest of the ride. I do agree that I lose a little pressure over time and it is just part of the routine to check the pressure in both high and low sides, I no longer use slime but basically drown the tire in soapy water when putting on a new one. Works for me!

Holy F**k! Flipping unicorns!!!!!

Sidebar; I was a super soapy water guy, yet lately to curb the loss of pressure overnight with some tires been adding a few ounces of slime, last winter during a tire set change I found a broken off cactus needle stuck in my tire, funny thing I was in the desert in August and the damn thing never lost excessive amounts of air, so maybe blind allegiance to the Tubliss concept but I’ve had great luck with them and the option of making tires offer killer traction in Low-Pressure land. So maybe not infallible they do work great for mountain DS and enduro world.....
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3 hours ago, mtdirtbag said:

Damn Unicorn attacked me the first year running Tubliss; one of the trails we ride goes through a former lookout site. When they tear these down quite often they burn a portion of it which leaves hardware on the site; I picked up a six inch nail which made it to the high pressure side didn't notice I had a flat for about three miles. Fortunately one of the riders carries a high pressure bicycle tire pump and was able to patch it and finish out the rest of the ride. I do agree that I lose a little pressure over time and it is just part of the routine to check the pressure in both high and low sides, I no longer use slime but basically drown the tire in soapy water when putting on a new one. Works for me!

You were able to patch the tube? How long did it last? How much of a PITA was it trailside compared to replacing a standard tube?

Tubeliss recommends carrying extra HP tubes for their system, claiming they are easier to carry than standard tubes, but i have heard it is nearly impossible to do on the trail. 

My well connected buddy says ride-on TPS is the way to go over slime. https://www.ride-on.com/

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31 minutes ago, Go_outside said:

You were able to patch the tube? How long did it last? How much of a PITA was it trailside compared to replacing a standard tube?

Tubeliss recommends carrying extra HP tubes for their system, claiming they are easier to carry than standard tubes, but i have heard it is nearly impossible to do on the trail. 

My well connected buddy says ride-on TPS is the way to go over slime. https://www.ride-on.com/

It was a pain to fix and I still have the tube as a backup, changed it out the following day or week - $10 (cheap at half the price!) The funny thing about the repair is one of the guys had a small container with liquid dish soap; rubbed it on the bead, add a little water from your camelbak and lever it back on. We always just lay the bike over and lever the tire off on one side, pull the tube, find the hole and patch it. With the Tubliss it was much more involved, but I think that was due to first time for a trail repair and too many hands helping. My biggest concern was getting enough air in it because we still had 20 miles of single track to the trucks. It may be a once in a lifetime happening (or at least I hope so!)

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3 hours ago, Go_outside said:

You were able to patch the tube? How long did it last? How much of a PITA was it trailside compared to replacing a standard tube?

Tubeliss recommends carrying extra HP tubes for their system, claiming they are easier to carry than standard tubes, but i have heard it is nearly impossible to do on the trail. 

My well connected buddy says ride-on TPS is the way to go over slime. https://www.ride-on.com/

You guys really should go to Mousses. They ride a little weird at first, but break-in and you can go 2-3 tires on Nitromouse's before needing another. Nothing fucks up a weekend like a flat. You blow all that time and gas to get there and the whole day can be trashed fixing them. I learned my lesson and only ride Mousses.

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I just spent the better part of an hour reading about mousses. and i still dont have a decision made.

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