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What do top off-road extreme enduro riders use for suspension? And what setup?

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I don't think these guys will tell anyone what suspension set-ups they run for racing. Competitive guys around here use Ohlins suspension - forks and rear shock or cartridge inserts and rear shock - or the WP top variant: cone valve forks and Trax rear shock. I had the chance to ride the bike of one of my friends equipped with cone valve / Trax suspension. It was day and night compared to my bike. Everything was plush and copying very well the terrain, outstanding bottoming resistance and consistent damping through out the stroke. I could ride at a much faster pace with that bike, steering was more precise, all the shaking in the handlebars reduced significantly. Even traction was way better, thanks to the complying rear shock, which did a very good job.     

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31 minutes ago, droom said:

I don't think these guys will tell anyone what suspension set-ups they run for racing. Competitive guys around here use Ohlins suspension - forks and rear shock or cartridge inserts and rear shock - or the WP top variant: cone valve forks and Trax rear shock. I had the chance to ride the bike of one of my friends equipped with cone valve / Trax suspension. It was day and night compared to my bike. Everything was plush and copying very well the terrain, outstanding bottoming resistance and consistent damping through out the stroke. I could ride at a much faster pace with that bike, steering was more precise, all the shaking in the handlebars reduced significantly. Even traction was way better, thanks to the complying rear shock, which did a very good job.     

Why not?  Extreme enduro isn’t as critical as say pro motocross suspension for example. It’s riding in technical trail and some open stuff. There aren’t any jumps. Guys will have their particular setups but I doubt that extreme enduro racing setups are going to be as hardcore like endurocross hitting big jumps. I think it will be interesting to see what info comes up in one place.

 

Edited by hawaiidirtrider
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44 minutes ago, droom said:

I don't think these guys will tell anyone what suspension set-ups they run for racing. Competitive guys around here use Ohlins suspension - forks and rear shock or cartridge inserts and rear shock - or the WP top variant: cone valve forks and Trax rear shock. I had the chance to ride the bike of one of my friends equipped with cone valve / Trax suspension. It was day and night compared to my bike. Everything was plush and copying very well the terrain, outstanding bottoming resistance and consistent damping through out the stroke. I could ride at a much faster pace with that bike, steering was more precise, all the shaking in the handlebars reduced significantly. Even traction was way better, thanks to the complying rear shock, which did a very good job.     

These guys you are referencing here...Are they riding Extreme hard enduro?

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19 minutes ago, droom said:

yes, they all do. I'm living in Romania :)))

Good you can tell us more of what difference guys run! But still Im doubting that guys are running stiff suspension. Right?

You know that’s funny you should say but hardly anyone used ohlins here throughout USA.. It’s interesting how different trends are in suspension from place to place.

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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I only say what I see on the ground. They (good Romanian riders) all have soft suspension, and many of them run Ohlins, I guess Ohlins is more accessible than WP Trax/Cone valve. Hard enduro requires plush suspension, but also bottoming resistance. It is easy to say: "we are running the standard suspension", but you don't know exactly what valving they run, what shims inside or what level of oil they have. It could well be that the only thing standard on that suspension is the fork leg. That is what I meant.    

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48 minutes ago, droom said:

I only say what I see on the ground. They (good Romanian riders) all have soft suspension, and many of them run Ohlins, I guess Ohlins is more accessible than WP Trax/Cone valve. Hard enduro requires plush suspension, but also bottoming resistance. It is easy to say: "we are running the standard suspension", but you don't know exactly what valving they run, what shims inside or what level of oil they have. It could well be that the only thing standard on that suspension is the fork leg. That is what I meant.    

Why much bottoming resistance for technical? No one is jumping ..As far as  what Shim’s exactly? Of course its going to be different for each rider anyway. What’s your point? Don’t question because we can’t find any specific info on this? I think we can get an idea. I don’t know anyone’s specific settings and setup but we can try to get an idea. Plus a setup for extreme enduro still needs a good rider and different riders are different in how big they are , their technique and style or riding.  

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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We have a different understanding of riding, I see. If you race in hard enduro events, you will have to carry speed over obstacles like logs, sharp-edged stones, step-ups etc. So you do jump, a lot actually. You need a plush suspension, as soft as possible, but you will also need something that stops short of sending shocks through out the chassis, because all that energy has to be absorbed somewhere. There are different set-ups for (hard) enduro and motocross. You cannot ride a motocross bike on a hard enduro terrain, I have seen it (friend with KTM machine equipped with Honda CRF forks set for motocross). 

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26 minutes ago, droom said:

We have a different understanding of riding, I see. If you race in hard enduro events, you will have to carry speed over obstacles like logs, sharp-edged stones, step-ups etc. So you do jump, a lot actually. You need a plush suspension, as soft as possible, but you will also need something that stops short of sending shocks through out the chassis, because all that energy has to be absorbed somewhere. There are different set-ups for (hard) enduro and motocross. You cannot ride a motocross bike on a hard enduro terrain, I have seen it (friend with KTM machine equipped with Honda CRF forks set for motocross). 

I think it depends on what you call jumping in hard enduro events. Got any video for an example? There is also a wide variety in what is called hard enduro from place to place and different terrain and weather conditions. Our hard enduro is different than king of the motos or extreme lagares or where you ride and sea to sky and Tennessee knockout enduro. It’s quite varied but still has enough similarities compared to mx suspension. Mx suspensions for that matter also are very different from track to track too. 

Also Im not sure that we have that much  of  a different understanding of riding..

I would like to ride where you ride though.. From what I can tell it looks good!

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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It's surprising that you don't see in the videos yourself posted instances where there is jumping, full travel of the suspension and bottoming danger. Any of those rocks will make your suspension work the full length and then some more, especially on the steep downhills. Here is one example, in slow mo:

  

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4 hours ago, droom said:

It's surprising that you don't see in the videos yourself posted instances where there is jumping, full travel of the suspension and bottoming danger. Any of those rocks will make your suspension work the full length and then some more, especially on the steep downhills. Here is one example, in slow mo:

  

Thanks good vid!!  Well just from the start is a big jump for hard enduro.. I don’t see that as much with lots of hard enduro. 

I do watch alot of video of hard enduro and there are few vids of down hill jumps etc.. a little but mostly everyone is on the ground.

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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You don't need to consider big jumps, like the ones one would see in motocross. As I noted before, any obstacles that you hit in succession (and in hard enduro you get tons and tons of obstacles) will solicit the forks and shock and will eventually - if the suspension is not properly set (enough bottoming resistance, good rebound) - lead to shocks in the chassis, the rider sent over the bars or even catastrophic deformation of the suspension. 

To exemplify: very common around here is to have uphills with steps and big roots. If the forks were firm, you would not be able to hit them and keep the bike going in a straight line, because the forks would fight the obstacles instead of absorbing the hits. But absorbing too much would not be a good thing either, because eventually it would reach the end of travel and stop, leaving you without suspension (with all the subsequent consequences). So you need soft plush suspension AND good bottoming resistance at the same time.

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