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MX track prep implements

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Hello all, im not exactly sure where to post this but ill try here.

we have an MX track locally that has been pretty much abandoned by riders. its a shame because its a sandy/loam track and its rideable throughout the winter. A friend and i just acquired a 120hp 4x4 tractor and were now wondering what would be the best implement to use to rip/disk the dirt. the dilema though is that we would also like to prep another local track that is quite hardpack. at first we were thinking disks for the sandy track but dont think they will rip the hard pack dirt of the neighboring track, so maybe a cultivator with finishing drum? Were just winging it here so would love to hear from guys who have gone through something similar or have experience prepping tracks of similar dirt. And i know that there is not a do it all implement out there, but a reasonable compromize would be nice. thanks for any input

 

Mike 

 

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Get yourself a do-all cultivator. It'll tear up that track & give you a well groomed riding surface for MX.

perfecta-II.jpg

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yes i saw this picture on google, i think it would work jsut fine for the snad/loam track but that implement is finishing a cultivated field, we would need something like a chissel plow first then break up the clumps with something like what is pictured above 

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I know nothing about this in practice but seems like with hardpack you would need some like rippers that bulldozers have on the back.

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I have had my own private track for 11 years now. Learned alot track prep over the years. That cultivator pictured above is a must have for both tracks. Should be all you need for the sand track. The hard packed track needs something to finish to get the clumps out. I use a field cultivator, chisel plow (what ever you want to call them) then go over it with a soil pulverizer to break up the clumps. I'll try to post a pic of one. I'll also drag a drag rake/harrow behind it. Those 2 will get the job done but that's just half the battle. Then you got to lay some water down. If you leave a ripped track open during the summer it will be bone dry in days. Then in the winter a ripped track will be just mush and take forever to dry out after a big rain. So with all that said, look into get a tow behind roller to pack the track afterwards. My on going process is rip to perfection, ride the crap out of it, then roll the track tight before any rain or going without riding for a week. Then start over. One thing that will really help that hard pack track out. Call around to local tree cutting/removal companies. See if they will dump their wood chips there at the track. Work all those wood chips into the dirt. I probably have over 100 tadem axle dump truck loads of wood chips worked into my turns over the past couple years. Makes for amazing dirt. Have fun. Hope my post isn't too long winded

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I don't own a track or implements but am very interested in this topic. I live in the rain forest and the soil is rocky at a local track and goes hardpack when things dry. It has been worked with wood chips but they never really get tillled in just dozer pushed and mixed over time as the track gets ridden. I believe if they get worked well into the soil it will be better overall with softer conditions and ability to hold moisture longer after watering during the dry season.There is talk of getting a tractor and tilling attachment but I believe it may be too rocky for a disc tiller and pretty hard for a cultivator. Power harrows look like a pretty good tool without going too deep but may need to do more rock screening first. Another tool that looked good for hard pack track breakup is a spader. 

Over time the track soil needs to be worked based on where you live and local conditions etc etc but it is always fun riding different soil types. Sounds like the area you have is pretty easy soil to work. Look at a power harrow. Maybe more maintenance than a cultivator dragging a chain harrow or pulverizer.

 

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Does the tractor have a bucket? Could use this on the hard pack, and also drag a disc harrow.  http://ratchetrake.com/ 

Its cheap and it looks like it can be used to get rocks off of that hardpack track, which is why I bring it up.  It also breaks that bluegroove surface.  ZInexpensive solution to the two worst parts about hardpacked tracks.  Bluegroove and rocks.    

 

Edited by dirtjumpordie

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I don't own a track or implements but am very interested in this topic. I live in the rain forest and the soil is rocky at a local track and goes hardpack when things dry. It has been worked with wood chips but they never really get tillled in just dozer pushed and mixed over time as the track gets ridden. I believe if they get worked well into the soil it will be better overall with softer conditions and ability to hold moisture longer after watering during the dry season.There is talk of getting a tractor and tilling attachment but I believe it may be too rocky for a disc tiller and pretty hard for a cultivator. Power harrows look like a pretty good tool without going too deep but may need to do more rock screening first. Another tool that looked good for hard pack track breakup is a spader. 
Over time the track soil needs to be worked based on where you live and local conditions etc etc but it is always fun riding different soil types. Sounds like the area you have is pretty easy soil to work. Look at a power harrow. Maybe more maintenance than a cultivator dragging a chain harrow or pulverizer.
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You would be surprised at how well a chisel plow will break up really hard packed ground. You can also remove half the shanks and slow the tractor down if it is not breaking into hard ground. I never used a power attachment because of the cost of maintenance. That rocky soil or even tree roots will cause some damage to a powered attachment. Track maintenance can be really fun. Enjoy it

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Thanks for the feedback, its all very useful info

23 hours ago, ka24s14am said:

That cultivator pictured above is a must have for both tracks. Should be all you need for the sand track. The hard packed track needs something to finish to get the clumps out.

weve been looking at a bunch of implements, the cheapest option is a "kombinator" (see below) was wondering if the open roller thats dragged behind would be enough to breakup the clumps from the hardpack. moisture is plenty in the wintertime here hence only the sand track can be worked/ridden, the rest of the tracks here are very slick in the winter. the summertime is a different story. The sand tracks dry out very quickly (watering them is almost futile, unless we could somehow introduce the woodchips/sawdust as you suggested). In the summer we are mostly at the hardpack track (which is also very dry but would hold moisture better) and is only a few km down the road form the sand track, see image below. 

here is the sand track a while back when it was somewhat maintained:

 

17 hours ago, SlickitySloan said:

There is talk of getting a tractor and tilling attachment but I believe it may be too rocky for a disc tiller and pretty hard for a cultivator

fortunately there are not many rocks here, i can see how that would complicate things. we are also considering a power tiller but apparently they are hard on the tractors that pull them and i would think they cause the dirt to "dry" quicker. 

17 hours ago, dirtjumpordie said:

Does the tractor have a bucket?

no, its just an old 1977 zetor (very popular here). we got it because it was the best power to $$$ ratio and parts are readily available and cheap! (from what seat time ive had its actually kinda a nice tractor considering how darn ugly it is! :goofy:) a front end loader here is pretty cheap (around 2000euros for 1500kg capacity loader) but we would need to upgrade the hydraulic pump on the tractor (too slow for a FEL)

the final option we are considering is a disk + roller but i dont think this will do much at all on hard pack? 

 

kombinator.jpg

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20171113_112043.jpg

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That kombinator will work just fine. If the roller in the back does not break up the clumps it will at least push them back into the dirt. Once you plow it a couple times the hard pack won't necessarily be a hard pack track any more. If you can plow the hard pack in the winter it won't be slick and greasy like you said. I hope yal get one, you won't regret it.

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Gearmore Arenavator III. It has spring teeth and a rear roller like the cultivator in the picture, but it has scarifier shanks that can be lowered into place to chisel hard-packed soil. http://www.gearmore.com/gearmore/admin/orderportal/product_group?formAction=ZOOM_POPUP_GROUP&Item=Arena-Vator+III

This would be ideal. But can't find something like it where we are. It's either a spring loaded cultivator with finishing drums or rippers with finishing drum but never both

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On 11/21/2017 at 1:40 PM, funkinalive said:


This would be ideal. But can't find something like it where we are. It's either a spring loaded cultivator with finishing drums or rippers with finishing drum but never both

Gearmore has a marketing agreement with Sicma (all Gearmore tillers are made by Sicma). I believe Sicma is an Italian MFG. Maybe Sicma can import one for you? on the other hand, it shouldn't be hard to find someone who can build one similar.

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23 minutes ago, TJbaseliner said:

on the other hand, it shouldn't be hard to find someone who can build one similar.

this is more along the lines of what we are looking at doing. We are fixing the tracks for the sake of them being prepped. What few riders will give goes into fuel costs but we are not demanding it. Essentially we are doing it so we can have a place to ride and experiment on how many riders we can attract. With this in mind we are not going for new equipment now. We will probably start by fabricating a row of rippers on the front of a heavier cultivator. Right now getting the paper work sorted for the tractor is a bigger headache as previous owner repainted the tractor and the color doesn't match whats in the paperwork. You would think that they would understand its just been repainted but no. It has to be inspected for "originality", bureaucracy at its finest...

Edited by funkinalive

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