Plating your dirt bike in Colorado

So I just when through this process this last week or two, not really that difficult, just time consuming. here is what you need to know

  1. If you have a CO title already, then it goes pretty easy, regardless you will need a vehicle vin verification and a vehicle compliance document, both will need to be filled out by a Colorado State Patrol department, I made (2) copies and brought them with me, I actually called the Ft.Collins CSP and they where booked up for a few weeks, but Greeley CSP got me in that day.
  2. Make sure you trailer the bike or have it in the back of your truck. Don't ride it there. 
  3. They will require your drivers license, be prepared for them to do a check on your name for any outstanding issues...warrants. Make sure all the paper work is completely filled out and signed before you leave.
  4. Bring $20.00 cash with you
  5. At the DMV, make sure you have the OHV, insurance card, compliance document and vehicle vin verification. They will issue you a title and give you plates if you say pretty please....
  6. Good luck

I'd add to that the minimum equipment requirements:

A rear view mirror

An electric horn

A working headlamp, taillamp and brake lamp

DOT tires

 

Edited by mrgem

The guy who did my inspection, didn't even want me to start the bike, I thought that was odd, you would think he would want to see everything working. He did check the tires...and made sure I had a mirror...thats about it

Been little by little doing this to my WR. Only thing left is horn and tires. Meats on there now are brand new so once I get the horn on I will be asking around for some DOT loaners lol. Pretty easy to get plated, glad things went so smooth for you.

Edited by morphrider

Just to be a little more precise for others that want to convert a dirt bike to a plated, street legal bike in Colorado, the form number is Colorado Dept of Revenue DR2686 that lists the specific equipment compliance information.  The Colorado State Patrol office will expect you to provide 2 copies of this form when you come in for your inspection appointment.  As long as it complies with the required equipment on the form, they will complete their portion of that form and sign it when you pay your $20 inspection fee (cash or check only).  Many CSP offices only conduct these inspections on certain days of the week and sometimes are weeks out before you can get your inspection appointment (at least on the Colorado Front Range).

Colorado State Patrol will also provide a completed Colorado Dept of Revenue DR2704 that you take with you to the county clerk to get plates.  You will need the DR2686 form, DR2704 form, and those items that are listed at the top of the DR2686 form, along with proof of insurance and your checkbook and they will issue plates.  Make copies of all this stuff because they will take it from you (such as Bill of Sale, Manufacturer's Certificate of Origin [MCO/MSO] and then send you a title 3 weeks later in the mail.

To a lot of county clerks this is a relatively unknown process and several times I have had them refer to the training manual as to how to convert a dirtbike.  Because that is the case, they can get into the bureaucratic nitpicking and look for any reason to reject it.  As long as you comply exactly to what is on the DR2686 form (regarding the required documents) and have your DR2704 form and proof of insurance you can get through the process.  Some will require you to fill out a form indicating the motorcycle doesn't have an odometer and mileage reading (which many dirt bikes don't).

Glad it went well for you.

here is the listing of Colorado Dept of Revenue DMV related forms.

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dmv/forms-number-order-0

 

SilvFx, here in CO do you need to provide any type of license requirements?

2 hours ago, morphrider said:

SilvFx, here in CO do you need to provide any type of license requirements?

morphrider if you are asking whether the county clerk checks to ensure you have a motorcycle endorsement on your driver's license before converting/plating a dirt bike....the answer is no.  However, your insurance company may have some requirements before it will issue insurance coverage.  And, of course you need to present proof of insurance when you request the plating at the county clerk's office.

My insurance asks nothing. My Raptors are insured, not sure if ATV is any different. On my insurance card they are stated as being "motorcycle". Thanks again for your insight.

The Colorado State Patrol will check your license for MC endorsement when they are doing the compliance inspection, They go back into the building for a few minutes, I am assume they check for any outstanding warrants at that time as well.

 

 

4 hours ago, dlee said:

The Colorado State Patrol will check your license for MC endorsement when they are doing the compliance inspection, They go back into the building for a few minutes, I am assume they check for any outstanding warrants at that time as well.

 

 

That's interesting.  Did they tell you they were doing that or are you assuming they are checking for MC endorsement?  I have converted/plated 5 or 6 bikes now through the process.  I dont recall anyone ever saying they were checking my license for an MC endorsement....of course I have had my endorsement since I was 16....so wouldnt matter.

Frankly I would think that having a motorcycle endorsement has NOTHING to do with converting or plating a dirt bike.   I could be converting/plating it merely for the purpose of selling it and not have a motorcycle endorsement.

Anyhow @morphrider I think you are fine on the conversion process without the endorsement if you don't have it.  Not so fine if you get stopped on your bike without one.  Pretty easy to get one.  Go to DMV that offers the motorcycle written test.  Pass the test, they give you a motorcycle beginners permit.  If you are over 21, the very next day you can do the motorcycle driving test and if you pass that you get the endorsement.  There are a whole bunch of 3rd party organizations that do MSF training courses where you pass the written test and also get the certification for motorcycle endorsement when you finish (e.g. pass the motorcycle driving test at their facility).  I called up one of those MSF training places when I wanted my kids to get motorcycle endorsements.  Talked to the owner.  He agreed to do the riding portion of the certification test without them having to take a full weekend course.  Cost me $50 each.

Nothing wrong with taking a weekend MSF course if you are going to ride on the street.  We are only using our plated bikes to connect from trail to trail and pass through small towns like Crested Butte, Telluride, etc without getting stopped so didn't think the my kids needed to do that whole MSF thing.  One interesting side note the owner/instructor told me is that "dirt bike guys" are always looking right in front of them and it is the toughest street riding habit to break.  He wants people riding on the street looking way ahead down the road (even up to 1/4 mile) keeping an eye out for people that can potentially pull out in front of you.

They did not tell me they where doing this, I am fairly confident they where checking for any outstanding warrants, be silly not to

Hmm...I lucked out when I registered my KTM in Weld County. I didn’t have to have any docs or inspection from the CSP, nor a VIN check. I just presented Bill of Sale so they could assess taxes owed, and I provided the title and proof of insurance. This was a used bike. I have headlight, taillight, brake light, horn but no rear mirror. Plates and registration were provided on the spot.

My guess is the title didn't say off road on it, if it did you probably would have had to jump through all the hoops.

On 11/21/2017 at 3:42 PM, dlee said:

They did not tell me they where doing this, I am fairly confident they where checking for any outstanding warrants, be silly not to

No legal expert here, but I would expect they would run the VIN on the vehicle to ensure not stolen.  Also, I dont believe the police are just allowed to check for outstanding warrants on you merely because you showed up to transact legal business.  I believe (but dont know for sure) they must have reasonable suspicion such as a traffic stop.  Anyhow, if I was in a position of having any outstanding warrants on me, the last place I would show up is at a police station or CSP headquarters.

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