Year 2000 KTM 200 exc, thoughts?

Is the year 2000 any good for the KTM 200's? 

I realize it's an old bike, but there aren't many 200's for sale where I am.

 

Here's some pictures of the bike for sale :

 

 

KTM1.jpg

KTM2.jpg

Unless someome put those forks on, it is a 98/99..... 45mm Marzocchi 

11 minutes ago, DEMI said:

Unless someome put those forks on, it is a 98/99..... 45mm Marzocchi 

Would it still be a good bike? Or should I wait and look for a newer model? 

It is a good bike, depends on price, etc. Looks ok in the pix.

I have a 2001 200 MXC in my garage, if you can get over KTMs awful PDS rear shock it's a strong running bike with a very beefy mid range powerband. It's a good trail bike or a bike for a beginner rider.

 

Try to pay less than $1500.

I have a 2001 200 MXC in my garage, if you can get over KTMs awful PDS rear shock it's a strong running bike with a very beefy mid range powerband. It's a good trail bike or a bike for a beginner rider.

 

Try to pay less than $1500. Use the dented pipe to your advantage in negotiations.

how much is he asking 

My first bike was an '01 200 EXC. Great bike. Takes a beating and is light enough for a beginner to pick up out of the bushes repeatedly. I even did a hare scramble on mine and was passing all the 250 4t guys in the 200 class. Paid $1300 years ago for mine. I definitely got my money's worth.

He wants $1500

I had this bike. Motor terrific, forks horrible. Yes the 2000 not the 98 or 99 that's pictured.

5 hours ago, shrubitup said:

I had this bike. Motor terrific, forks horrible. Yes the 2000 not the 98 or 99 that's pictured.

How can you tell that it is in fact the 2000? 

If I get this bike, what sort of plastics do you guys recommend to make it look nicer?

Maybe a new seat cover would be good? 

 

I'm trying to put my finger on exactly what it is. Compare it to a 2009 yzf 250. What is it that makes this look older? 

I have a 99 200 MXC , good motor , not so good forks. I think there are some mods to get the forks working better but I haven't done them. The bike in the picture has a different front fender, side panels, seat cover and rear fender. The stock front fender was a different shape and the side panels and rear fender were silver/grey. Also someone removed the kickstand. These era bikes are solid bikes if they are in good shape. I have seen a few guys racing these era bikes (98-02) and sure looks like they are having fun like the rest of us.

4 hours ago, Wyatt Kampel said:

How can you tell that it is in fact the 2000? 

It could be a 2000 with older forks I suppose. The 2000 came with upside down forks but they still sucked. 

I'm not too familiar with engines, but could it have problems with the bottom end being so old? I would think the transmission would ware. And that's an expensive repair, I would guess about $1000 USD? 

What is the worst that could happen if I bought it for $1500? 

Edited by Wyatt Kampel

If it needs a new top-end, that's alright. Maybe a few hundred bucks?

I just don't want to buy the bike only to have major issues.

Really the only thing I could think of would be the bottom end. This bike 17 years old, so I'm wondering if it may need a new bottom end.

 

Edited by Wyatt Kampel
59 minutes ago, Wyatt Kampel said:

If it needs a new top-end, that's alright. Maybe a few hundred bucks?

I just don't want to buy the bike only to have major issues.

Really the only thing I could think of would be the bottom end. This bike 17 years old, so I'm wondering if it may need a new bottom end.

 

Remove ignition cover. Try to move flywheel up and down. If it doesn't do that then the crank bearings are fine and you typically won't need a new bottom end for a while. The big end bearing in the crank however - the only way to test this is to remove top end and test for movement of the connecting rod against tolerances published in the service manual. Even if you did hafta do a bottom end you're looking at $250 roughly for the crank and bottom end bearings and gaskets and then $250 in labor. If you can find a bike with this already done WITH receipts to prove it then you're money/time/hassle ahead. 

2 hours ago, shrubitup said:

Remove ignition cover. Try to move flywheel up and down. If it doesn't do that then the crank bearings are fine and you typically won't need a new bottom end for a while. The big end bearing in the crank however - the only way to test this is to remove top end and test for movement of the connecting rod against tolerances published in the service manual. Even if you did hafta do a bottom end you're looking at $250 roughly for the crank and bottom end bearings and gaskets and then $250 in labor. If you can find a bike with this already done WITH receipts to prove it then you're money/time/hassle ahead. 

$250 isn't bad. I expected it to be worse. I guess the reason 4 strokes are so expensive when the motor fails is because of the valves? 

I could probably figure out how to do it myself, and skip the labor costs. I know how to change pistons, not sure how much more complicated that would be.

 

So, there really isn't a big risk buying the bike like with a 4 stroke? The reason I ask is because I am debating between this bike and a 2009 kxf 250. 

Edited by Wyatt Kampel
2 minutes ago, Wyatt Kampel said:

$250 isn't bad. I expected it to be worse. I guess the reason 4 strokes are so expensive when the motor fails is because of the valves? 

I could probably figure out how to do it myself, and skip the labor costs. I know how to change pistons, not sure how much more complicated that would be.

 

So, there really isn't a big risk buying the bike like with a 4 stroke? The reason I ask is because I am debating between this bike and a 2009 kxf 250. 

Four stroke likely needs whole new head comprised of valve stem seals, new seats cut, new valves, new cam chain, etc. Two stroke absolutely cheaper to rebuild. I had a 2016 KX250F which needed valve work. $350 for valves and $350 to have seats cut. Do that every 60 hours even if just recreationally trail ridng. No thanks. I have 2 two strokes now. Easy days. 

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