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1998 XR200R Refresh

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That should be helpful. When I think of an "impact driver", I'm thinking a 1/4" bit driver, so thought I'd ask. 

I have all my air impacts, but my Matco 1/2" cordless is really handy to have! 

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Posted (edited)

Still a no go. Even heated it up first with a heat gun. All this work and money lol. I may just swap forks totally. I even debated on prying the seals out from top side.

Edited by WoodsRERider
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  Worst case scenario: Drill the head off. Then pull it apart and the bolt should come right out of the damper rod.

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45 minutes ago, Doogee57 said:

  Worst case scenario: Drill the head off. Then pull it apart and the bolt should come right out of the damper rod.

Thinking that is probably what I'll have to do. I'm thinking just use a bit that is maybe 1/4 the size of the bolt head? Should pull apart rather easily after?

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  I usually use a drill the same size as the bolt/thread size and drill into the socket and the whole bolt head comes off (usually sticking on the drill bit). Then the fork slider will slide right off leaving the rest of the bolt in the end of the damper rod. The you can usually spin the bolt out with your fingers because there's no tension on it. If memory serves me, the fork bolt on an XR is 8mm which is .0025" bigger than 5/16" so you could just use a 5/16" drill bit. And NEVER use RED locktite when re-assembling it. Didn't you say you've already got one of the forks apart? Measure the bolt size to be sure. (I'm certain it's not a 6mm but it might be a 10mm)

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Just rechecked. It's def 8mm. I have one fork off and apart, aside from the bottom bolt of course. Sounds like a straightforward fix. 

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   Pretty much. It's a hassle but not too bad. Like I said, once you drill the bolt head off and you get it all apart, you should be able to easily get the bolt out of the damper rod. There's a lot to grab on and if you have to, you can grab the bolt with vise grips. But DON"T grab the damper rod with vise grips or mar it up in any way. The top of the damper rod actually has a hex in it. It's like 19mm or something and you can use a bolt like a giant allen wrench if you have to.

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Success. Ended up drilling it out and got it apart. Now the edge of the head is still in the thread is my only problem at this point lol. Overall everything went smoothly 

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Ended up ordering be new OEM bolts and washers from Honda Parts Warehouse. Won't be here for a few days. Quick question about finding TDC and checking valve clearances. I can see the intake valve open and shut. Is the next complete rotation TDC of the compression stroke? I feel some pressure on the flywheel at that point when at the "T" mark. Is this normal or am I on the wrong stroke?

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If you're on the correct stroke and at TDC, both valves will be closed

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My XR200 experiences...
Bought a new 83 XR200 in 1983 for my then girlfriend (now wife) to race Powderpuff MX (women's class as they called it back then).
Could not have bought a better bike for her. She won the state MX women's title.
... Kawasaki wanted to give her (me) two KX125s for her to race, I passed cuz that XR was just so right for her.
I rode a 500 & a 250, raced expert lever MX.
I used that XR200 in several hare scrambles and enduros, VERY good bike for both.
I've had four different XR200s for the kids to ride.
Raced in several desert races and enduros, did well as the bikes were easy to ride really fast in tight courses.
I've had several XR250s also, those bikes are deadly quick in the woods.
I know this is about XR200s.... could not be a better bike for overall riding for kids, women and men.
A good rider can make quick work out of the "real" big bikes with no problem at all. I've done it. 
 

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2 hours ago, arthur6 said:

My XR200 experiences...
Bought a new 83 XR200 in 1983 for my then girlfriend (now wife) to race Powderpuff MX (women's class as they called it back then).
Could not have bought a better bike for her. She won the state MX women's title.
... Kawasaki wanted to give her (me) two KX125s for her to race, I passed cuz that XR was just so right for her.
I rode a 500 & a 250, raced expert lever MX.
I used that XR200 in several hare scrambles and enduros, VERY good bike for both.
I've had four different XR200s for the kids to ride.
Raced in several desert races and enduros, did well as the bikes were easy to ride really fast in tight courses.
I've had several XR250s also, those bikes are deadly quick in the woods.
I know this is about XR200s.... could not be a better bike for overall riding for kids, women and men.
A good rider can make quick work out of the "real" big bikes with no problem at all. I've done it. 
 

That's awesome. Totally agree. The "big bikes" may have a lot more power on paper per se. Means nothing when you can't manage it or get it all to the ground. The nastier and tighter it gets, the better these XRs perform. The lower seat height also means the bike is more manageable. I'm assuming the CRF230F is pretty much the same. Will probably be my next bike purchase.

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8 hours ago, WoodsRERider said:

That's awesome. Totally agree. The "big bikes" may have a lot more power on paper per se. Means nothing when you can't manage it or get it all to the ground. The nastier and tighter it gets, the better these XRs perform. The lower seat height also means the bike is more manageable. I'm assuming the CRF230F is pretty much the same. Will probably be my next bike purchase.

CRF230 weaker than XR200 in bone-stock form but once uncorked and properly-jetted will walk away from XR200.  CRF230 lower CR than XR200 but shorter/smaller stock cam profile makes up by producing LOTS of low-mid torque.

CRF230 stock suspension is AWFUL and shock is dangerous due to too much rebound damping causing bucking.  CRF230 heavier than XR200 but slimmer egos and low CG make it feel and ride lighter than it is.

Bruce Triplett can revalve the stock shock and add high-flow piston head and he is also a Hagon shock dealer.  Bruce does amazing things with DR forks and can make them better than Race Tech Cartridge Emulators.

Both XR200 and CRF230 are great bikes for slow short tight work because of low height and small chassis.  However, small chassis not so good for fast long open work and if doing lots of that XR250 is a better choice.

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Forks back together and installed. While putting the wheel back on and axle, I accidentally snapped two of the four front axle studs. Doesn't seem like a biggie, I was able to get the broken ones out. I can't seem to find these anywhere online. It doesn't seem like something the hardware store would have, but I may be wrong. I usually get parts from Babbitts online Honda Parts Warehouse, but I don't see this part.

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51 minutes ago, WoodsRERider said:

Forks back together and installed. While putting the wheel back on and axle, I accidentally snapped two of the four front axle studs. Doesn't seem like a biggie, I was able to get the broken ones out. I can't seem to find these anywhere online. It doesn't seem like something the hardware store would have, but I may be wrong. I usually get parts from Babbitts online Honda Parts Warehouse, but I don't see this part.

I think I used exhaust studs for the head.  They are listed in the parts diagram.

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2 hours ago, chadzu said:

I think I used exhaust studs for the head.  They are listed in the parts diagram.

Thanks!! Found it. #24 in cylinder head. Ordered.

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   Make sure when you tighten the axle clamp that you tighten the top bolts first, then the bottom ones. There's an arrow on the clamp showing which way is up. If you look at the clamp from the side you can see that the top side is longer. It is suppose to lock up solid against the fork slider. If you try to "even up" the gap you will actually have the clamp cocked, putting a bending load on the studs (and that can snap em).

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1 hour ago, Doogee57 said:

   Make sure when you tighten the axle clamp that you tighten the top bolts first, then the bottom ones. There's an arrow on the clamp showing which way is up. If you look at the clamp from the side you can see that the top side is longer. It is suppose to lock up solid against the fork slider. If you try to "even up" the gap you will actually have the clamp cocked, putting a bending load on the studs (and that can snap em).

Thanks for the heads up! Yea I was tightening each opposite of each other when they snapped. For example upper left, then lower right. 

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