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Hey guys, 

I am really needing some good advice here from anybody who has ever owned or rebuilt classic Yamaha 2 strokes (1989 - 1994). I live in South Africa, and bought a little farm thumper while on holiday this past weekend. It was advertised as a DT175 which is a bike that is easy to get parts for down here. It has been cosmetically customized and looks pretty darn cool... and lets face it, all the old classic Yamaha 2T engines look the same at a glance! So I genuinely thought it was a naked DT. The bike had no papers, and was used purely for the farmer to putt around on his farm.

The only things needing attention was the stator cover which had snapped in half - this was visibly noticeable, and a little leak from a badly resealed gasket (both generally easy and cheap to fix here). The bike was still running and idling fine, started first kick, and I had a little ride around the farm before loading the bike up onto my pickup and heading off, thinking I could fix this thing up nicely in no time for next to nothing, and have what we call down in SA "a nuwe speelgoed" (A new plaything) for the weekends when I am not riding my beloved and reliable DRZ400SM. 

SO, I get home and decide to contact our local Yamaha branch, out of interest, to find out the history of the bike before I start fiddling (Don't ask me why I did not do this all before I bought the bike - It was a spur of the moment purchase, and was sold to me for dirt cheap!). I send off the VIN and engine number. Comes back, and this little freakin' turd turns out to be a 1989 TDR180!! WHAT. But now I am stuck as we do not really have TDR's down here - and I have never even seen one myself.

Long story short - What alternative could I use as a stator cover? Do any other old Yamaha 2T model stator covers fit the TDR or share similar engine parts? Ordering from Ebay is so expensive thanks to my country being in junk status due to a junk president. So the shipping costs more than the actual item does, and our customs is a joke too. Yamaha has also advised me that this stator cover has been discontinued.

I have put up local ads looking for parts, contacted FB 2T groups, and local shops. Nothing for TDR's has come back yet.

Any advice or sharing of experience is welcome! 🙂

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Hey guys, 
I am really needing some good advice here from anybody who has ever owned or rebuilt classic Yamaha 2 strokes (1989 - 1994). I live in South Africa, and bought a little farm thumper while on holiday this past weekend. It was advertised as a DT175 which is a bike that is easy to get parts for down here. It has been cosmetically customized and looks pretty darn cool... and lets face it, all the old classic Yamaha 2T engines look the same at a glance! So I genuinely thought it was a naked DT. The bike had no papers, and was used purely for the farmer to putt around on his farm.
The only things needing attention was the stator cover which had snapped in half - this was visibly noticeable, and a little leak from a badly resealed gasket (both generally easy and cheap to fix here). The bike was still running and idling fine, started first kick, and I had a little ride around the farm before loading the bike up onto my pickup and heading off, thinking I could fix this thing up nicely in no time for next to nothing, and have what we call down in SA "a nuwe speelgoed" (A new plaything) for the weekends when I am not riding my beloved and reliable DRZ400SM. 
SO, I get home and decide to contact our local Yamaha branch, out of interest, to find out the history of the bike before I start fiddling (Don't ask me why I did not do this all before I bought the bike - It was a spur of the moment purchase, and was sold to me for dirt cheap!). I send off the VIN and engine number. Comes back, and this little freakin' turd turns out to be a 1989 TDR180!! WHAT. But now I am stuck as we do not really have TDR's down here - and I have never even seen one myself.
Long story short - What alternative could I use as a stator cover? Do any other old Yamaha 2T model stator covers fit the TDR or share similar engine parts? Ordering from Ebay is so expensive thanks to my country being in junk status due to a junk president. So the shipping costs more than the actual item does, and our customs is a joke too. Yamaha has also advised me that this stator cover has been discontinued.
I have put up local ads looking for parts, contacted FB 2T groups, and local shops. Nothing for TDR's has come back yet.
Any advice or sharing of experience is welcome! [emoji4]

If you can't find parts, part it out. Supply and demand.
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6 minutes ago, HeavyRotation said:


If you can't find parts, part it out. Supply and demand.

I really like the frame. It looks super gangster without fairings, is super comfy to sit on, and is in great condition (no rust etc). The only thing holding me back is the stator cover! Everything else is interchangeable and pretty much identical to the DT's engine. It would be such a shame to part it out just because of this.

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I really like the frame. It looks super gangster without fairings, is super comfy to sit on, and is in great condition (no rust etc). The only thing holding me back is the stator cover! Everything else is interchangeable and pretty much identical to the DT's engine. It would be such a shame to part it out just because of this.

After a high speed highway crash that destroyed my stator cover on my zx6r I dug a turkey pot pie tin out of the garbage at a gas station and duct taped it on. Made it 150 miles home. What I'm saying is that cover isn't super important, just make something.
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5 minutes ago, HeavyRotation said:


After a high speed highway crash that destroyed my stator cover on my zx6r I dug a turkey pot pie tin out of the garbage at a gas station and duct taped it on. Made it 150 miles home. What I'm saying is that cover isn't super important, just make something.

Lol. Thanks for giving me some hope! So if I cannot find anything, then I will go makeshift!

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3 minutes ago, S.O.A.N.Z said:

RT180 stator cover fairly close ?

rt.jpg.0f46efacd516900f2d508a432a13bb7d.jpg

Correct! Thanks for the post! I have seen this on ebay, but the problem is that the price with shipping is over 1200 ZAR and takes yonks to get here (If it even does). I will have to take this expensive route if I don't find anything locally in SA though. RT's are also not common here. Someone suggested a Yamaha Blaster stator cover???

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So here is a high tech answer to your problem. Take the broken part to a 3D capable print shop. Have them photograph in 3D. The output from the photo can be fed into the printer. That way you get exact copy of part you need. Just the rambling of an old guy for what it is worth.

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4 hours ago, Josh/Avery said:

"If it is broke in half, use some jb weld and bolt it back with a new gasket until you can find a replacement. I would also recommend to anyone, put a tube of Quicksteel in your toolpouch. It is an epoxy putty that hardens quickly and can get you out of a bind."

I completely agree, in the field the clay 2-part roll plumbing epoxy is good in a pinch as it is clean, dry (not liquid), safely packaged, and will harden semi-Permanent.   JB Weld is a unique product of its own, and I recommend that for the cheapest long-term repair.  But honestly Duct tape is your best friend and unless there are no tabs to bolt both parts down, and black is an easy color match. 

Proper repair short of replacement would be welding, but it might be magnesium, having the word "Magnesium" cast into the cover. Do not trust that to a nonprofessional, it will either be a disaster or an extremely hazardous disaster.

     My tiny Spec. Binder is about 4" x 5" x 1.5" and has all information for every Yamaha Motorcycle from 1975 - 1983 for sale in U.S. except the pages that were not inserted.    No idea about your model unfortunately.

    The DT175A Model year 1974 started with frame / engine number of 443-000101.  B 1975 (no change), C 1976 559-000101, E 1978 2A7-000101, F 1979 2N5-000101, H 1981 3J1-060101.  Don't know about interchange as the dealerships did not print lists back then.  Typically, a first-year model having first year parts would start with a prefix like the 443- and initially most replacement parts would have the same prefix and then number distinctions for each functional system on the bike, the part type and finally a revision number.   When a part is the same in following years it would have a non-matching prefix.   You could tell by your part number if it matches a engine prefix from a previous year that it would be the same starting prior. If your cover is the same as your frame you would know if following years specified the same part number instead of their prefix it would match those years.   So first knowing your prefix and your part numbers you can find the matches then follow up with pictures from a site like Bikez dot com that has many with clean factory photos (don't know about the DT though) only to confirm after determining the model year range and being certain it was a confirmed part # on the purchased part and that it was a specified part for your bike by Year Model Engine Prefix - Serial Number.

     I was a Yamaha Mechanic from 1979-1985 and was burdened by knowing proper methods and practices.  An example is I would never recommend fix a flat as it eliminates the possibility of patching a tube.  I was forced to alter my perception when a friend sponsored a quad only 3-day weekend camping trip.    We used at least 6 tire plugs and never were down for more than 20 minutes covering a minimum of 160 miles of the Mojave Desert.   Granted they were tubeless tires but I started off thinking he was clueless when he pulled out a dime store quality tooling repair kit.

     In a similar fashion, for some reason I thought JB Weld, was unusable, and that it had an association for me with the lack of quality of J.C. Whitney products sold in the 1970's.   In spite of that I carried a package of that stuff for 6 years and I was way wrong.  My friend broke a case tab that is the connection point for a manual clutch cable on his 1985 Honda XL500.  He fixed it with carburetor cleaner and just applying a mound of the epoxy over the snapped off tab while carefully resting it in the original position.  It was probably 1/2" round and 3/8" high.  Even with often not a properly lubricated cable, he only sold that thing last year, and it still was in place, smooth and hard as a rock.

       I have had success with the clay plumbing epoxy indicated above but it has a fairly rough sandy texture when compared to the JB Weld and I have noticed the clay is not quite as durable in positions with stress or severe vibration. However, for fixed situations it is fantastic and hardens much faster than JB Weld which much like a good 2-part Marine Epoxy takes over 24 hours to fully cure.   So, for a home fix the JB 2-part Metal and Hardener would be reasonable and possibly semi-Permanent if you filed a V groove in the back side, roughed up with a grinder, and built it up in a 15mm wide strip no more than 3-4mm high.

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37 minutes ago, Fred X said:

I completely agree, in the field the clay 2-part roll plumbing epoxy is good in a pinch as it is clean, dry (not liquid), safely packaged, and will harden semi-Permanent.   JB Weld is a unique product of its own, and I recommend that for the cheapest long-term repair.  But honestly Duct tape is your best friend and unless there are no tabs to bolt both parts down, and black is an easy color match. 

Proper repair short of replacement would be welding, but it might be magnesium, having the word "Magnesium" cast into the cover. Do not trust that to a nonprofessional, it will either be a disaster or an extremely hazardous disaster.

     My tiny Spec. Binder is about 4" x 5" x 1.5" and has all information for every Yamaha Motorcycle from 1975 - 1983 for sale in U.S. except the pages that were not inserted.    No idea about your model unfortunately.

    The DT175A Model year 1974 started with frame / engine number of 443-000101.  B 1975 (no change), C 1976 559-000101, E 1978 2A7-000101, F 1979 2N5-000101, H 1981 3J1-060101.  Don't know about interchange as the dealerships did not print lists back then.  Typically, a first-year model having first year parts would start with a prefix like the 443- and initially most replacement parts would have the same prefix and then number distinctions for each functional system on the bike, the part type and finally a revision number.   When a part is the same in following years it would have a non-matching prefix.   You could tell by your part number if it matches a engine prefix from a previous year that it would be the same starting prior. If your cover is the same as your frame you would know if following years specified the same part number instead of their prefix it would match those years.   So first knowing your prefix and your part numbers you can find the matches then follow up with pictures from a site like Bikez dot com that has many with clean factory photos (don't know about the DT though) only to confirm after determining the model year range and being certain it was a confirmed part # on the purchased part and that it was a specified part for your bike by Year Model Engine Prefix - Serial Number.

     I was a Yamaha Mechanic from 1979-1985 and was burdened by knowing proper methods and practices.  An example is I would never recommend fix a flat as it eliminates the possibility of patching a tube.  I was forced to alter my perception when a friend sponsored a quad only 3-day weekend camping trip.    We used at least 6 tire plugs and never were down for more than 20 minutes covering a minimum of 160 miles of the Mojave Desert.   Granted they were tubeless tires but I started off thinking he was clueless when he pulled out a dime store quality tooling repair kit.

     In a similar fashion, for some reason I thought JB Weld, was unusable, and that it had an association for me with the lack of quality of J.C. Whitney products sold in the 1970's.   In spite of that I carried a package of that stuff for 6 years and I was way wrong.  My friend broke a case tab that is the connection point for a manual clutch cable on his 1985 Honda XL500.  He fixed it with carburetor cleaner and just applying a mound of the epoxy over the snapped off tab while carefully resting it in the original position.  It was probably 1/2" round and 3/8" high.  Even with often not a properly lubricated cable, he only sold that thing last year, and it still was in place, smooth and hard as a rock.

       I have had success with the clay plumbing epoxy indicated above but it has a fairly rough sandy texture when compared to the JB Weld and I have noticed the clay is not quite as durable in positions with stress or severe vibration. However, for fixed situations it is fantastic and hardens much faster than JB Weld which much like a good 2-part Marine Epoxy takes over 24 hours to fully cure.   So, for a home fix the JB 2-part Metal and Hardener would be reasonable and possibly semi-Permanent if you filed a V groove in the back side, roughed up with a grinder, and built it up in a 15mm wide strip no more than 3-4mm high.

Thanks for this post, it was very insightful and much appreciated. I will definitely consider buying these items and keeping them handy when I do ride, or if I face any problems :)

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AFTER SEARCHING MY BUTT OFF for a whole week, and asking around on just about every platform - I had someone contact me last night who had 2 actual TDR180 covers lying around at home. He is also working on a TDR180 but with the full original fairing kit, and is struggling to find a gear box. SO it seems I am not the only one who struggled to find parts for this bike in SA. Thank you everyone for all your help and valuable advice 🙂 I definitely learned a thing or two if I face any future issues with finding casings! Collected the stator cover last night!

I have ordered an exhaust gasket and gasket kit and collecting it after work today. Going to respray the engine black, the frame black, and the tank will be sprayed an army green colour with some nice white decal. Will look like a new bike, but still oldschool 🙂 ! Super excited! I will totally post pictures of the finished project once the engine is sorted, and I have pimped it out with some other basic parts.

Just wanted to show you guys what my dilemma was, and a photo or 2 of the bike in its current form. I could not believe a few things the previous owner did to the bike, but all easily fixable it seems. Will be getting a new 2T pipe to replace the FIRE EXTINGUISHER that was used. Damn. Anyway!

Thanks again, TT people!

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