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Maximizing "BRP" XR 650R Resale Value

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What's up fellas, 

So I have a 2003 BRP, from what I can tell, the resale value of the bike is anywhere between $2,500-3,500. The bike is in good condition - runs well, been taken care of in terms of maintenance, no leaks.. etc. It is not set up for street use and is mostly stock aside from Big Gun exhaust and having the "uncorked" mod, which allows for greater air intake and performance. I'm looking for your guys' suggestions and opinions in terms of additional modification to the bike that would allow for the greatest resale value (i.e. what will buyers want to see). Thanks in advance, I appreciate the advice. 

BRP.jpg

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In my humble opinion most people would want to set it up to with the mods they would want. So you would be putting $$ out and not getting $$ or time & effort back

I bought my 2001 in 2003 for  $3,500.I have put over 3,500  in it. 

Mods: E2 exhaust, Mikuni TM40, GPR steering stabilizer (which caused me to buy upper & lower triple clamps), Baja Designs light kit (not installed) ,Xr's only case saver, chain slider, ADV levers, Stainless brake lines, XR's only Air box mod, Renthal twin wall bars (Ricky Carmichael Bend), SRC fork brace, new plastics, Wider foot pegs,  Litz racing re-valve & rehab of suspension (for 170lb rider). + I went thru the trouble of getting it plated & titled

I tried selling it on here last year for $5K . No takers. & that didn't take into my time & labor

Edited by OTTOMATIK

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That's along the lines of what I was thinking. Keeping it as close to stock as possible. Make sure it looks clean and is mechanically sound. I don't want to spend money that I won't get back, I'm really looking for cheap/simple mods that I may want to consider to maximize what I can sell it for. Recently I had the carb. dialed in by Malcolm Smith and had to replace the petcock. Really just trying to have a clean bike to sell when the time is right. 

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You don't get your money back on mods so stock is better in my opinion. One of the biggest things I look for when buying a bike is how clean it is and if there are any poorly done repairs. Clean and detail the bike and make sure the oil is clean and everything is lubricated and working correctly. Most top dollar bikes are sold near stock. 

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I look at these things just a little differently. For the most part, bikes and motor vehicles in general are not investment vehicles (pardon the pun). You buy them to do one of two things, have experiences while riding / modifying / fixing them or simply to poses them as objects of mechanical beauty. Sure sometimes you may flip them and make a few bucks but it's a pretty small return considering the time and effort we tend to put into them.

So I;

1. Never buy new,

2. Always buy the ones with as many expensive mods as possible already done

3. Have as much fun as possible with them 

4. Modify them without a concern for return $$ on investment but buy used parts when available. No point in tossing money away.

5. Keep them a long time (this part varies)

6. Maintain them mechanically and cosmetically so they look as good as they operate

 

When selling remember;

Buyers are always looking for that one great deal! The "diamond in the ruff", once in a lifetime deal that they can brag about to their friends. If you bike looks mint...really mint, they tend to leap on it assuming that everything under the hood is mint too. Just like taking pictures of your vehicle in front of a beautiful house makes the buyer think that it was well maintained, seldom ridden and the perceived value is higher.

So keep it close to stock, fix your graphics that are peeling, replace the damaged grips and clutch lever, maybe toss a new rear fender on there and sell away.

Good luck!

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What hondaxr650rrrr said.

Replace the obvious things that are wrong.  Put on new grips, or at least put caps on the ends of the bars which are currently cut out for wrap around handguards.

That clutch lever is bad.

You are missing at least one seat bolt.

The holes from whatever was mounted to the back fender are not good, but with a new fender running $85+ I can understand the argument to leave it as is.  At a minimum, get some plastic polish (or something like PC Racing Plastic Renew) to do your best to get rid of the skid/scuff marks on the side panel and clean up the rear fender.

Route the front brake hose correctly (it goes inside the lower fork tube, not outside it).

From my point of view, the throttle cables also look a little tight and could possibly be routed incorrectly under the tank.

When selling a 650R, at this point in time I have seen that most buyers for them know what they are looking for.  Seeing a bike with bent parts, cables/hoses routed wrong, etc... just tells a buyer that you either a.) don't care about maintenance/upkeep or b.) don't know about maintenance/upkeep.  I don't think that to be the case, but that is the impression that someone could easily have walking up to this bike off the street.

First impressions to get the most money with a sale are always of the upmost importance.  If someone is coming by my house to look at a bike, I always make sure that the house looks good on approach, and my shop is clean and organized in addition to the bike being as close to perfect as it can be.  You may just be selling the bike, but you are also selling yourself.  You want to present the look that yes, the bike is in great shape and it is always that way because I take care of everything or at least have it taken care of.  If I am meeting someone with the bike in the truck, the truck will be spotless.  Give someone the confidence that you are meticulous (even if it is just a facade!) and you usually can command a little more premium compared to the other guy.

Frankly, it doesn't matter how nice the bike is, if I got up to the house and the lawn looked like it needed a swather to come through and one of the blocks under the "Camero" (intentional misspelling) was broken I am going to amazingly lowball any offer.

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Hey, I really appreciate the suggestions. That's exactly the type of advice I was looking for. I plan on doing most of the cosmetic "polishing," adjusting, and replacing that you guys have brought up. I appreciate the trained eye you guys are able to offer. I was given the bike for free from an old riding buddy, and plan on riding it for a while until the time is right to sell and upgrade. I recently posted the bike in craigslist for $3,325 just to see if I get any bites (not even sure if I would sell at this time, but I think it's good to test the market). Patience may be my best advantage when it comes to selling, because I am willing to wait for the deal I want. Obviously I don't want to overprice the bike, but do plan on waiting to get the higher end of what it's worth for the condition it's in. I have already replaced the bolts that are missing in the picture. I plan on getting new handlebars, grips, and hand guards in the near future. Not sure if I'll sell those or put the stock bars back on when it's time to sell. Also, I will need to look into the correct way route that front brake line. I appreciate the feedback fellas. 

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Looks like your clutch lever is bent forward.  Ge that straightened out. Better yet, replace it.  
If you have a nicer looking set of handlebars and grips, put those on the bike.  

And yes, get it plated.  A lot of guys looking for XR650Rs are dualsport guys.  

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On 1/6/2018 at 11:52 AM, ZachP said:

...I'm looking for your guys' suggestions and opinions in terms of additional modification to the bike that would allow for the greatest resale value (i.e. what will buyers want to see). Thanks in advance, I appreciate the advice...

As the seller the value is best for you by spending as little as possible on it.  That is unless you're in no hurry and don't mind waiting for that needle in the haystack buyer. 

As already mentioned above there is no better investment than getting it plated.  I wouldn't spend much money trying any upgrades.  I think even fixing what is wrong is up to you.  If it's cheap and easy for you then do it.  If not, then look it over, get all the prices together, and list them up front for the buyer.  If you choose stuff that you like you're likely to narrow your market with each modification and increase in price.  If you give consideration for the price of repairs needed by reducing the selling price so they can get exactly what they like you're much more likely to sell it to them at the price they want to pay.  

I've bought and sold 2 650Ls and a 650R in the past year.  The 650R was by far the most difficult and brought the least amount of profit.  No joke, the first question from each prospective buyer of the 650R was "is it street legal?".  It got so frustrating that I pulled the advertisements for a while to try again to plate it. 

I'm in South Carolina and I couldn't get it plated (which is the only reason I sold it) and it cost me $700 off my asking price.  I thought it was a great bike in great condition but it just wouldn't bring the money I expected (in the 4 months I had it listed).  I incrementally dropped the price over a few months and eventually sold it for $2,000.  I was very surprised.  I advertised it on a few forums as well as Craigslist and Motorcycle trader.  There was lots of "interest" but when it came right down to it folks just didn't seem to see the value I thought they would without it being the street legal.  The East Coast market for them doesn't seem nearly as good as the West Coast.

From the forum community there was lots of support and folks saying how great the price was and how I would have no problem selling it but only one person from the forums expressed interest and called me about it.  I've found that the we love to talk about them but that's about as far as it goes because we're usually pretty far into our own already.  I think a lot of the buyers for dirt only bikes like this would rather spend their money on a CRF. 

Mine was a nice 2000 model in great mechanical condition and great cosmetic condition.  I regret selling it worse than any other bike I've ever owned and actually found it for sale again a few months later and tried to buy it but the guy wouldn't come off his $2,700 price at the time.  I thought that was hilarious.  It isn't listed any longer so I wonder if he found that $2,700 guy for it.

R Right.jpg

R Left.jpg

Edited by Hollerhead

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