Amd241997

Inline Four for Beginner?

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As the title suggest, I’m looking at purchasing an older model inline four like the ‘06 GSX-R600 or R6. I’ve been looking at bikes for about 6 months and doing quite a bit of research. I’m coming from dirt bikes, which I hardly get to ride anymore so I’m looking for fun bike to ride even if it’s just to and from work everyday with the occasional ride through the canyons. I was originally looking at a duke 390 or a cb500f as I love the look and feel of a naked bike, but being that their newer bikes and pricey, I started looking at the older model bikes. I’m 20 and have a fair amount of driving experience and off road experience. I won’t really get to test ride since all I have is my permit so I’m looking for your guys honest input and help. I can get an ‘06 GSX-R600 with about 6,000 miles for $5000 versus the 2017 KTM Duke 390 for $6600.

 

Is an inline four 600 too much for someone moving into street riding or should I start on a single or twin cylinder? Thanks!

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The 06 bikes are just as fast as the 2018 bikes.  I don't think any of the 600s make particularly good street bikes.  Something like an SV650 or an FZ07 is a lot more fun as you can rev it out and they have a lot more torque and character.  If you've been riding dirt then your basic clutch and throttle skills are probably fine, but the street is a totally different environment from offroad riding.  

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The 06 bikes are just as fast as the 2018 bikes.  I don't think any of the 600s make particularly good street bikes.  Something like an SV650 or an FZ07 is a lot more fun as you can rev it out and they have a lot more torque and character.  If you've been riding dirt then your basic clutch and throttle skills are probably fine, but the street is a totally different environment from offroad riding.  

I’m looking at older model only because I don’t plan on spending my whole tax return on a bike. Plus, being my first bike I don’t want to lose money if for some reason I have to sell. I don’t necessarily need more torque either, don’t want to stall out at a light or pop off the line too hard. I’m going to be taking the MSF in March so I won’t be able to test ride most likely. I’ve looked into the FZ07 as well, but compared to the price of the ‘06 gixxer and mileage it’s a little out of my budget.

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Buy a SV650S for your 1st bike. Cheap, reliable, torquey and forgiving. Road and dirt are 2 different things. Not to mention that motorcycle are invisible to the average brainless moron behind the wheel of their slaughter bucket, relentlessly checking their FB rather than watching the road.

 

Once you start going to look at bikes I'll think you'll find out that a good portion of used sport bikes are steaming piles of shit. Owned mostly by kids with the mechanical aptitude of a rock and the riding skill of a blind paraplegic, you'll notice that the odometer only reads half of the correct mileage as the bike was on it's side skidding more than it was on its wheels.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hello fellow Utahn! 

Have you factored insurance into the equation?

Street is an entirely different animal. Everyone out there is trying to kill you (especially in Utah), so why start with a bike that will try to kill you as well (the relatively low torque of a 600cc i4 can fool you... at high rpm, these bikes make some serious power that can quickly become overwhelming).

Honestly, I'd start with a Ninja 250/300 or an SV650 (I prefer twins on the road, myself). You'll pay maybe $2000 for the bike and sell it for the same, have cheap insurance, and it will teach you all the rules of the road. And you can guarantee that they will still carve the canyons just fine.

Edited by MarioThePlumber

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Hello fellow Utahn! 
Have you factored insurance into the equation?
Street is an entirely different animal. Everyone out there is trying to kill you, so why start with a bike that will try to kill you as well (the relatively low torque of a 600cc i4 can fool you... at high rpm, these bikes make some serious power that can quickly become overwhelming).
Honestly, I'd start with a Ninja 250/300 or an SV650 (I prefer twins on the road, myself). You'll pay maybe $2000 for the bike and sell it for the same, have cheap insurance, and it will teach you all the rules of the road. And you can guarantee that they will still carve the canyons just fine.

The insurance cost is the exact same for me for a ninja 300 for example. I know the bike size comes into factor, but the main thing is going slow to help you learn and then getting faster. Not sure if I’ll enjoy anything smaller than a 500 because I’ll probably end up selling it after 2 weeks. I’ll check that one bike out that you mentioned though. I heard they were good bikes. Not planning on buying for at least another 2 weeks or so, and I’m sure as hell not gonna buy on impulse because it’s what I think I want.

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My first street bike was a 1992 GSXR 750

I was 21 but had been racing dirt bikes since I was 14. If you have a lot of experience on dirt it carries over to pavement IMO but nothing wrong with going with a starter bike then moving up

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My first street bike was a 1992 GSXR 750 

I was 21 but had been racing dirt bikes since I was 14. If you have a lot of experience on dirt it carries over to pavement IMO but nothing wrong with going with a starter bike then moving up

 

This is what I’ve been told as well. As dirt riders we’re used to losing rear wheel traction and riding over obstacles which can help translate to street (gravel on a rode, small potholes you didn’t see quick enough, etc.). It may be the kid in me, but the 600 i4 sounds way better and looks better than their twin counterparts, which a little bit of a factor to me if I’m going to invest my money into it.

 

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Posted (edited)

37 minutes ago, Amd241997 said:

This is what I’ve been told as well. As dirt riders we’re used to losing rear wheel traction and riding over obstacles which can help translate to street (gravel on a rode, small potholes you didn’t see quick enough, etc.). It may be the kid in me, but the 600 i4 sounds way better and looks better than their twin counterparts, which a little bit of a factor to me if I’m going to invest my money into it.

 

The biggest hurdle for a young and dumb kid like yourself on a sport bike is to not do stupid shit

When I had mine I couldn't restrain myself from being an idiot. Having a bike that was capable of doing 150mph was too tempting and flying past traffic at that speed was exhilarating 

Edited by MotorBotin' Meyer

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Slipping on gravel in the road can cause a low side or (even worse) a high side, and I don't think dirt experience will help with that (it'll happen faster than you can react).

The best way to avoid a situation like that is to be alert.

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This topic has been hashed over and argued about so much it's a lot like an oil thread. Safety on a street bike lies in the mentality of the rider and their willingness to refrain from riding over their skills. A Ninja 300 will run 90 mph with anything less than a 200 lbs rider. The last time I checked, hitting a solid object at 90 mph will render you pretty much the same form of dead as hitting it at 150 mph will. A Ninja 300, SV650, or whatever, is inherently no safer than a 600, it's all in how you ride them. About the only things that cross over from the dirt to the street is that the controls are in the same places. Street is a totally different skill set, bikes react different, surroundings are different, you have to develop different reactions and muscle memory. All that takes time, try to rush it and there will be tears.

Best bet is to stay out of heavy traffic areas at first. Pay attention, focus on what you're doing, be alert and aware of your surroundings, exercise common sense, and you have a pretty good chance of being alright. :thumbsup:

Edited by OLHILLBILLY
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This topic has been hashed over and argued about so much it's a lot like an oil thread. Safety on a street bike lies in the mentality of the rider and their willingness to refrain from riding over their skills. A Ninja 300 will run 90 mph with anything less than a 200 lbs rider. The last time I checked, hitting a solid object at 90 mph will render you pretty much the same form of dead as hitting it at 150 mph will. A Ninja 300, SV650, or whatever, is inherently no safer than a 600, it's all in how you ride them. About the only things that cross over from the dirt to the street is that the controls are in the same places. Street is a totally different skill set, bikes react different, surroundings are different, you have to develop different reactions and muscle memory. All that takes time, try to rush it and there will be tears.

Best bet is to stay out of heavy traffic areas at first. Pay attention, focus on what you're doing, be alert and aware of your surroundings, exercise common sense, and you have a pretty good chance of being alright. :thumbsup:

You definitely said it best and honestly this was the input I was looking for. I understand the rules of the road and what other cagers don’t understand or fail to see on the road. So thank you for your input. Hell, a 49cc scooter could get my injured just as quick as a liter bike. Just depends how I treat it and how well I pay attention. The street is a whole nother world from dirt in that there’s no traffic on dirt, the ground is more forgiving to you and your machine, and no idiots (most of the time). I can’t go crazy like I can on dirt. In some ways I’ve questioned if I even want a street bike because even in my big ass truck people still fail to see me and pull out right in front of me. But, we never know when what day will be our last, and as long as I’m safe about it and start slow then I should be able to develop the fundamentals I need to react quickly and avoid injury. Thank you.

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Pretty sure I’m gonna go for the 2016 R3. They got one at a dealer near me for $5200 OTD brand new which is about the same price I’d pay to get a used 2006 600 with about 10,000+ miles before licensing costs. Plus, insurance for me is about $220 cheaper a year for the R3 versus the 600’s. So, I’ll ride this for at least a year and if I want a better one I’ll upgrade. But, the first year is all about learning the road and how a bike handles on asphalt versus dirt, so I’m pretty sure I won’t be too occupied by the power or lack thereof of a 300 anyways. Thank you all for your input. Safe and happy riding!

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5 hours ago, Amd241997 said:

Pretty sure I’m gonna go for the 2016 R3. They got one at a dealer near me for $5200 OTD brand new which is about the same price I’d pay to get a used 2006 600 with about 10,000+ miles before licensing costs. Plus, insurance for me is about $220 cheaper a year for the R3 versus the 600’s. So, I’ll ride this for at least a year and if I want a better one I’ll upgrade. But, the first year is all about learning the road and how a bike handles on asphalt versus dirt, so I’m pretty sure I won’t be too occupied by the power or lack thereof of a 300 anyways. Thank you all for your input. Safe and happy riding!

R3 is a great bike. Very light, excellent handling, very solid and reliable, no slouch for power for a 300 either. :thumbsup:

If there are any road race tracks around you (may be scarce in Utah), look into doing a track day. You can learn more about how to handle your bike in one day at the track than you can in years on the street. Plus, there's nothing like being Rossi for a day. :)

Edited by OLHILLBILLY
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R3 is a great bike. Very light, excellent handling, very solid and reliable, no slouch for power for a 300 either. :thumbsup:
If there are any road race tracks around you (may be scarce in Utah), look into doing a track day. You can learn more about how to handle your bike in one day at the track than you can in years on the street. Plus, there's nothing like being Rossi for a day. 

Ya I’ve got a track not too far that I’d like to take it to eventually. I actually just found a ‘16 R3 with 7664 on the odometer and talked the guy down from $3800 to $3200. Good deal or no? He has all the service records and I’m gonna go check it out this weekend.

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Probably good. Check NADA for book values, that'll give you an idea of worth and price range to look for.

I’m a little hesitant about mileage since I’ve never owned a street bike, but that’s not a lot of mileage right? I mean, I know you can get a really good bike with three times that amount as long as they have all maintenance records and a shit bike with a third of that if it wasn’t maintained properly.

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Yeah, 7600 is nothing on a street bike. I've seen old R6s and ZX6Rs with 60,000 miles on them, still running fine. Maintenance is the key, and with service records, it's good.

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Yeah, 7600 is nothing on a street bike. I've seen old R6s and ZX6Rs with 60,000 miles on them, still running fine. Maintenance is the key, and with service records, it's good.

Ok cool. Ya if he can’t get all the records I’ll most likely pass. Bought a few dirt bikes in the past with blind maintenance records and got screwed. But, seems to be a good deal. Definitely beats $5200 for a new one at the dealer when I’ll lose money immediately after rolling it out the door. They seem like really good bikes so I’m pretty excited to see what it does for me.

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After 5 years riding dirt I bought my first street bike a few months ago.

My situation is different though as I'm more than twice your age and live in the middle of no-where with lots of great empty roads to ride.

I debated a lot about a first bike and even rented an Ducati 821 for a couple of days to get a feel for things.  Ended up buying a KTM SDR 1290 as I ride at HIGH altitude and bikes are way down on power.

If you take traffic out of the equation, I think street is pretty easy since you really can't push it (corners) on the street.  Just remember low speed handling is VERY different on a street bike (due to weight).  You can't lean the bike underneath you (while you sit upright) like you can on a dirt bike.  You gotta hang off it and counter steer to make it turn.

A twist of the wrist by Keith Code is a great reference for street riding and it goes over counter steering etc.

Also braking in a corner is very different and takes a lot of adjustment.  Hit the front brake while you're leaned over and the bike will stand right up and go straight ahead.  You have to condition yourself to brake and counter steer (more) at the same time.  Until you learn that, you basically have no brakes in a corner.

But over all I find my dirt riding to be way more dangerous as I ride on the edge all the time.  Only place you can do that on a street bike is the track.  However missing a rock/oil spill/gavel/drive way etc can kill you on the street.  You have to stay 100% focused.  Don't get into road rage with a car.

As for what bike to get....  IMO you want something that you don't have to rev to the moon to enjoy the power.  It'll be way more fun day to day. V-twin or triple for the street.  You want torque not HP.

Watch your mirrors when you're at a stop light (leave your bike in gear) and have an exit plan if the car(s) behind fail to stop.  Also remember engine braking is huge on a street bike and does not activate your brake light.

Whatever you do take it easy while you're learning.  Get counter steering and mid corner braking down (reflex) before you start pushing it on the road. 

Get good riding gear!  Have fun!

Edited by Colorado^
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