Ben500RR-S

Beta as a snowbike=incredible. (More pics), and another review

47 posts in this topic

I put another Camso DTS 129 kit on my brother in law's 2008 CRF 450X that he traded a cow/beef for.  While the CRF is 9 years older than the 2017 RR-S 500, the RR-S is just superior in every way.  I'll do a review either later in this thread or I'll start another one but at least for today, today was the best riding I have ever done.  Ever.  It was like my entire life was practice for all the pure powder riding we did on the snowbikes today.  

I love dirtbiking, it has always been the most fun thing I can do but now snowbiking has taken over as it combines the fun, the shifting, all the positives of the dirtbike but with none of the jar and jolt, no roots, rocks, holes, whoops, just soft, cushy snow to power on through or up, or down.  It  is the addiction to beat all addictions and the best part is that all I can do is look forward to the next day to ride, before I know it, winter will be over and we can ride the dirt again and not be so cold while doing it.  

I got a RotoPax 1 gallon tank, then got a 2 gallon RotoPax storage box and the extension to make the storage box tighten down with the twist on clamps-which I've been loving.  It makes using the gas can and the storage just so easy  and the hard mount is fantastic.  We had ridden about 20 miles and I had emptied almost the entire gallon into the bike so I now know that I can go about 40 miles on a tank and will be able to go 20 miles on the gallon of reserve in the Rotopax.  Generally, the track kit is sucking 50% of the power as I might get 50 mph on the trail, maybe 55 or 60 top speed, and while I get about 40 mpg on the street/trail, I'm getting 1/2 of that in/on the snow, which is no problem, just that everything gets cut by 1/2 on the snow.  

Stock for stock, all the Beta's controls, and how the bike feels, at least on the snow, is way better than the Honda's.  The CRF450X is carbureted and does not have a hydraulic clutch, and as it does not have either a quick turn throttle or jimmy twister, the entire bike feels so crude compared to the RR-S.  The 2008 Honda has also been ridden very easily its entire life as evidenced by how clean the motor is.  My motor, from going through all the puddles, mud puddles, swamp puddles, every kind of dirty water has gotten onto my motor and has stained or etched the metal unlike the CRF that is almost showroom clean despite being 9 years older than the 2017 Beta.  Oh well.  One area where both the bikes are more equal is in power.  The Honda has great power but I also feel that the Beta could take it in a dragrace or any kind of roll-on, either way, my BIL and I agreed that we do not yearn for more power with either bike.  

More tomorrow.  

 

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What has also been great is that the bike has been having a much easier time starting in gear.  I'm wondering if it is because I went back-and will be staying with, the Motul Transoil Expert.  I will know it is the oil if I can get the bike into neutral at a stop going down from 2nd gear.  I did do a short oil change and xmission oil change as I wanted to see if any fuel was being added to the oil and there was not so I'll leave the oils in for longer this time.  

It was also in the 20's and low 30's so starting and the clutch sticking were non issues, thankfully.  

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Ben500RR-S said:

I'm glad you guys like the pics and the story(ies), when I see that I post more so here it goes;

 

 

What has also been great is that the bike has been having a much easier time starting in gear.  I'm wondering if it is because I went back-and will be staying with, the Motul Transoil Expert.  I will know it is the oil if I can get the bike into neutral at a stop going down from 2nd gear.  I did do a short oil change and xmission oil change as I wanted to see if any fuel was being added to the oil and there was not so I'll leave the oils in for longer this time.  

It was also in the 20's and low 30's so starting and the clutch sticking were non issues, thankfully.  

 

 

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Several of my dirt bike friends now snowbike; one in particular has been an avid snowmobiler for the past 25 years that I have known him and was invited out on a spare snowbike. This was two years ago and he is now on his second iteration of snowbike and sold his sled. Little bit different terrain in this part of the country tho.

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that looks like crazy fun in the snow!  I'm going to have to take a whirl on one when I am back visiting the motherland one of these winters....

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2 minutes ago, mtdirtbag said:

Several of my dirt bike friends now snowbike; one in particular has been an avid snowmobiler for the past 25 years that I have known him and was invited out on a spare snowbike. This was two years ago and he is now on his second iteration of snowbike and sold his sled. Little bit different terrain in this part of the country tho.

Unless my kids want one, I'm not going to ever buy another snowmobile.  The snowbike is where it is at., at least for off-trail riding.  Groomed trails, unless they offer tracks made for the trail, the snowbikes don't do as good, I think they are ok on the groomed trail but off trail is where it is the most fun.  

We have enough O/T to enjoy up in VT and are lucky to have it.  

Your part of the country is awesome.  All the guys on Snowest are from out that way, UT, Montana, Colorado, Nevada.  I can only imagine the areas to ride out there.  

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2 minutes ago, Squish441 said:

that looks like crazy fun in the snow!  I'm going to have to take a whirl on one when I am back visiting the motherland one of these winters....

They crossed the bike with a snowmobile and it rides like a jetski/personal watercraft.  It is a total blast.  Beg, borrow or steal one to ride, it's worth it.  

I'm like an addict waiting for my next fix as I know that the time is limited as it will be spring before we know it around here.  

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humor my lack of experience with it - does the track replace the entire swingarm, or frankenstein in off the rear sprocket?

How much does the average kit cost, and how hard to install / remove?

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20 minutes ago, Squish441 said:

humor my lack of experience with it - does the track replace the entire swingarm, or frankenstein in off the rear sprocket?

How much does the average kit cost, and how hard to install / remove?

It is all bolt and go/plug and play.  

 

The track does replace the swingarm and it just bolts in place of the swingarm bolt, then a strut rod goes from the tunnel to the top shock bolt.  C/S sprocket to the primary sprocket, then that connects to the secondary sprocket that drives the track.  

Camso DTS 129 kits retail for $4,799.  

The initial install takes about 3 hours total and most of the time is spent tearing everything off the bike.  Now that I have done it twice to two different bikes.  It might take me an hour, maybe two at the most to get the kit off and the bike back together.  The good thing about it is that on the way out, I clean, then when I go back in, I will lube everything up so it is good for the bike to swap back and forth.  

Just now, Ben500RR-S said:

I'm happy to talk Beta and snowbike all day long.  

 

It is all bolt and go/plug and play.  

 

The track does replace the swingarm and it just bolts in place of the swingarm bolt, then a strut rod goes from the tunnel to the top shock bolt.  C/S sprocket to the primary sprocket, then that connects to the secondary sprocket that drives the track.  

Camso DTS 129 kits retail for $4,799.  

The initial install takes about 3 hours total and most of the time is spent tearing everything off the bike.  Now that I have done it twice to two different bikes.  It might take me an hour, maybe two at the most to get the kit off and the bike back together.  The good thing about it is that on the way out, I clean, then when I go back in, I will lube everything up so it is good for the bike to swap back and forth.  

 

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So, how do these compare to studded tires? We don't get enough snow to bother with either option but I've ridden on knobbies in a few inches of snow (with no packed snow, it doesn't stick around long enough to get a base).

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Looks awesome!  Thanks for the post although it makes me miss New England pretty bad...

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1 hour ago, Marylander said:

So, how do these compare to studded tires? We don't get enough snow to bother with either option but I've ridden on knobbies in a few inches of snow (with no packed snow, it doesn't stick around long enough to get a base).

I've ridden on a full set of Trellborg studded tires on a 1996 CR500R I had and while they were good in/on the snow, it was only good up to a point as the tires relied on either getting down to the frozen ground or a snow base and once the snow got too deep it was pretty much no-go in the snow.  

Not so with the DTS(DirtToSnow) kit.  The snow could be bottomless and the front ski will float and the track will get the bike up and go.  For my BIL and I, who know the limits of the long track sleds he has, with the snowbikes we can go just about anywhere we want and as effortless as can be.  Where on pure powder/mountain sleds it takes incredible fitness and strength-not that I don't have either, but to sidehill is a pretty big undertaking, especially at the end of the day/night when one is tired.  On the bike it is just point and shoot.  

The studded tires were fun on the ice/lake/ice racing track(s) though, I will give it that.  

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I rode my Uncle Wilson's snow mobile's in mountains of Colorado when I was a kid and loved it.  My question is, how does the bike handle in the snow? Does the front end with the ski on it grab well enough to steer or does it have a tendency to want to "wash out"?  I'm an Arizona guy, so you have to pardon my ignorance.  This does look like a ton of fun and I love the pictures! 

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1 hour ago, GunnerTowny said:

I rode my Uncle Wilson's snow mobile's in mountains of Colorado when I was a kid and loved it.  My question is, how does the bike handle in the snow? Does the front end with the ski on it grab well enough to steer or does it have a tendency to want to "wash out"?  I'm an Arizona guy, so you have to pardon my ignorance.  This does look like a ton of fun and I love the pictures! 

They turn and handle great!  You can carve hard and lean them right over, not sure I ever had my front end wash out.   I take mine places I could never go with my Summit, it just handles so much easier with much less effort.  I got hooked last year I almost like it more then dirt.

 
We're heading to just south of Houghton, MI Saturday, they have 4 feet on the level and supposed to get some fresh the next couple days so should be perfect.

 

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I've been on snowmobiles for years.  Can't speak to riding a snowbike as I haven't been on one.  

The comments made about being in top physical shape and strength are only half true for mountain sleds.  I'm on 2010 models and take pride in running them along side guys that have the newest sleds.  The new mountain sleds are so amazing, more power stock, deep lugs and tip and sidehill with just a quick lean.  Yes, mountain sleds still suck on the trails.

Newer sleds are making it easier to run all over the place without feeling as exhausted at the end of the day.  I still like 200hp in a 425lb sled and rip like a madman, not sure the snowbike will give me that but I'm sure it boondocks and winds around in the trees much easier.  Can't say I always choose something because it's easy though. 

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7 hours ago, TroutRunner said:

I've been on snowmobiles for years.  Can't speak to riding a snowbike as I haven't been on one.  

The comments made about being in top physical shape and strength are only half true for mountain sleds.  I'm on 2010 models and take pride in running them along side guys that have the newest sleds.  The new mountain sleds are so amazing, more power stock, deep lugs and tip and sidehill with just a quick lean.  Yes, mountain sleds still suck on the trails.

Newer sleds are making it easier to run all over the place without feeling as exhausted at the end of the day.  I still like 200hp in a 425lb sled and rip like a madman, not sure the snowbike will give me that but I'm sure it boondocks and winds around in the trees much easier.  Can't say I always choose something because it's easy though. 

Can't beat the horsepower of a sled, that's the one thing a snowbike lacks.  If I was in the mountains or if it was more open around here I'd ride a sled but there's nothing open here it's all woods and the snowbike is so much easier to navigate with. 

 

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