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I got both of the big bearings all disassembled and greased but I can't get the small one apart. Does it not come apart or is there a trick? Or do I just hit it harder? Bike is a 15 300rr.

20180111_173340.jpg

Edited by cachunko

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I just did mine last week. You have to tap it with a punch from the other side. My bearing was seized and i had to replace the bearing, seals and bushings

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What I tried doing was using a slightly smaller socket and tapped on it from one side. I hit it decently hard, but not too hard because I didn't want to break something. So I just need to hit it harder ya think? Mine isn't seized, it turns freely. Maybe I should just leave it alone? 

 

Edited by cachunko
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5 minutes ago, cachunko said:

What I tried doing was using a slightly smaller socket and tapped on it from one side. I hit it decently hard, but not too hard because I didn't want to break something. So I just need to hit it harder ya think?

 You need to use a punch and hit the edge of the bushing and    Coming in from the other side.

if you look inside the hole you will see the split line of the bushing. Hit That all the way around and the bushing will come out, pushing the seal with it. Hope that helps 

 

 

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Alright. I'll give that a shot. I was using a small flat head screw driver and was tapping from the inside like you say. But I was doing it pretty lightly. I've never done this before, obviously. The two big ones came apart so easy. It's surprising how much difficulty I'm having with this one. 

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Thats too light a grease for this application.  Amsoil polymeric is the best I've found.  Polymeric means its not displaced by pressure or shock, designed for heavy equipment.  Scrap the seals and use orings, never replace a bearing again, seriously.  I have over 300 hrs on originals.

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Lower shock bearing oring - 4.5 x 15

All others - 4 x 24

use 36 x 25 x .2 shims as retainers.  

www.mcmaster.com

 

IMG_1515721981.743720.jpg

Edited by GP
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43 minutes ago, GP said:

Thats too light a grease for this application.  Amsoil polymeric is the best I've found.  Polymeric means its not displaced by pressure or shock, designed for heavy equipment.  Scrap the seals and use orings, never replace a bearing again, seriously.  I have over 300 hrs on originals.

Well that's a major bummer. I've done all the wheel bearings, steering stem, and linkage with it. All I have left is the swing arm. It's gonna have to be good enough for a while at this point. It has to be better than the tiny bit of grease that was there from the factory. Can you get the amsoil stuff at any stores? Or online? 

Neat idea about the orings and shims. 

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2 minutes ago, cachunko said:

Well that's a major bummer. I've done all the wheel bearings, steering stem, and linkage with it. All I have left is the swing arm. It's gonna have to be good enough for a while at this point. It has to be better than the tiny bit of grease that was there from the factory. Can you get the amsoil stuff at any stores? Or online? 

Neat idea about the orings and shims. 

A lot of auto parts stores have it, or you can order.  I use the Superlube as a suspension assy grease when doing forks and shocks as its so light.  Its a silicone grease with teflon added supposedly.  The polymeric is very sticky, it stays put, including on your hands and tools.  After a full season of rides and washes, it all looks like I just did it.  Wipe out, add fresh grease, new orings, good for another year.  

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I've used superlube for everything. I always liked it because it didn't drip out of my gun. I guess I better get something a little better. Is the amsoil a "good for everything" kind of grease. I need a jack of all trades :)

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Any pivot on the bike.  A little nasty for an air filter rim though.  For sure its thick and will not drip from a gun, I use a gun as a dispenser.  Waterproof is a non issue, if water gets in the bearing its all over anyway.  Another tip, for the wheel bearings, use the SKF rotating seals and spacers.  What a great product, perfect sealing for a whole season for $37 a wheel.  

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Yeah, I wouldn't use regular grease on an air filter haha. I like these tips. I'll check those skf seals out. Again, I'm fairly new to this kind of stuff. It's the first time I've ever taken a bike this much apart. I'll take all the tips and help I can get. 

What's the best 2 stroke oil to use (don't worry, just kidding haha!) 

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17 hours ago, GP said:

Amsoil polymeric is the best I've found.  

I couldn't find any of the amsoil locally, so I got some lucas xtra heavy duty. I hope that comes in at a close second.

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18 hours ago, GP said:

Lower shock bearing oring - 4.5 x 15

All others - 4 x 24

use 36 x 25 x .2 shims as retainers.  

www.mcmaster.com

 

IMG_1515721981.743720.jpg

What holds the shims in place? The bolt diameter is obviously quite a bit smaller than the hole in the shim, and the shim doesn't fit inside the knuckle.  It seems like it would just kind of fall down?? 

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Its captured by the mating surface.  Note that the length of the inner sleeve and caps is barely longer than the rocker.  i do this on the swingarm as well but use thicker shims as the sleeves are longer.  It works well, seals much tighter than a narrow single lip seal and keeps the crap out, which is key.

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On 1/11/2018 at 3:57 PM, cachunko said:

What I tried doing was using a slightly smaller socket and tapped on it from one side. I hit it decently hard, but not too hard because I didn't want to break something. So I just need to hit it harder ya think? Mine isn't seized, it turns freely. Maybe I should just leave it alone? 

 

1) If it rotates freely with out any coarse feeling I would leave it alone.  2)  One way I have used to get these bearings out is a socket of slightly smaller diameter than the bore in the rocker piece to push on one side of the bearing and a socket larger than the outside diameter of the bearing on the other side of the rocker assembly.  Using a bolt and some washers put the sockets on either side of the bearing and put the bolt through the sockets.  Thread the nut on the other end of the bolt and you can start tightening the nut down.  As you tighten the nut the smaller socket will drive the bearing out of the rocker arm and into the inside of the larger socket.

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